North Korea

What is North Korea known for?


multiple+hits

Volunteer Army Chinese troops at close range after multiple hits. S.L.A. Marshall, ''Commentary on Infantry and Weapons in Korea 1950–51'', 1st Report ORO-R-13 of 27 October 1951, Project Doughboy Restricted , Operations Research Office (ORO), U.S. Army (1951) However, the carbine was again issued to some U.S. troops in Vietnam, particularly reconnaissance units (LRRP) and advisors as a substitute standard weapon. Reports of the ineffective stopping power


massive attacks

in the center and Pyongyang in the north (currently North Korea), because of its advantageous location. Some of the large, traditional markets like Seomun Market are still flourishing in the city. These Jurchen pirates lived in what is today Hamgyŏngdo, North Korea. They frequently attacked the eastern coast of the Korean peninsula. In particular, Ulleungdo was abandoned because of their massive attacks. The invasion in 1019 was one of those incidents. The current political


reporting live

Nguyen , reporting live outside Changi Prison. The law


called ancient

with the founding of Gojoseon (also called ''Ancient Chosun'') by the legendary Dangun in 2333 BC. Archeological and contemporaneous written records of Gojoseon as a kingdom date back to around 7th-4th century BC. Gojoseon was eventually defeated by the Chinese Han Dynasty and its territories were governed by four Chinese commanderies, but this did not last long. Natives of the peninsula and Manchuria soon reclaimed the territory, namely the Three Kingdoms of Korea, Goguryeo, Silla, and Baekje. The '''Goguryeo Kingdom''' (or Koguryo) ruled the entire area of modern North Korea, as well as parts of Manchuria and the northern parts of modern South Korea. Buddhist and Confucian teachings were prominent in the Goguryeo Kingdom, which adopted Buddhism as the state religion in 372. Despite repeated attempts by China, namely the Sui Dynasty and later the Tang Dynasty, to conquer the Korean Peninsula, northern-based Goguryeo managed to repel them. Eventually, Goguryeo fell to a Silla-Tang alliance, which had earlier defeated Baekje. This unified Korea under the Silla dynasty. Even though Tang later invaded, Silla forces managed to drive them out, thus maintaining Korea's independence. Unified Silla was replaced by the Goryeo (also called ''Koryo'') dynasty, from which the modern name "Korea" derives. One highlight of the Goryeo dynasty was that in 1234 the world's first metal movable type was invented by a Korean named Choe Yun-ui (200 years before Gutenberg's printing press). Buddhist learning spread during this time and the former Baekje and Goguryeo leaders were treated well. The kingdom saw relative peace until the 8th and 9th centuries when clan leaders led uprisings and toppled the Silla, establishing the Goryeo Dynasty from which the name "Korea" was derived by Westerners. During this period, the nation suffered Mongol invasions, which led to unrest and the eventual establishment of the Joseon Dynasty in 1389. Joseon Dynasty The Joseon Dynasty was one of the longest running dynasties in the world, ruling from 1389 until 1910. '''King Sejong the Great''''s rule was especially celebrated, as he helped create the Korean script, ''choson'gul'', which allowed even the commoners to become literate. He also expanded the nation's military power to drive out Japanese pirates and northern nomads and regain territories that had been lost. The Japanese invaded Korea under the leadership of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, though the Joseon Dynasty managed to drive them out with the support of China's Ming Dynasty, albeit with heavy losses in the Korean peninsula. In spite of its losses, the nation experienced about 200 years of peace, and its isolationist policies allowed it to further develop a uniquely Korean culture and identity. Rapid modernization stirred by the Second Industrial Revolution created tension between China and Japan as they felt the pressures of Western expansionism, each wanting to extend their influence over Korea. This eventually led to the Sino-Japanese War in 1894, which took place on the Korean Peninsula, devastating the Joseon. Then in 1905, Japan defeated Russia in the Russo-Japanese War, making Korea a protectorate until they were finally able to annex Korea in 1910. Japanese occupation and a divided Korea The Japanese exercised rule of the peninsula until their defeat in WWII in 1945. Japan was forced to surrender the territory and the Allied Powers divided the nation at the 38th Parallel, with the Soviet Union occupying the northern half and the United States occupying the southern half. The divide was supposed to be temporary however the political power struggle between the two nations to gain influence over the unified Korea led each to establish governments within their newly created territories. North Korea was established as its own nation in 1948 with the support of the Soviet Union, following the Soviet Communist model, with Kim Il-Sung as its leader, while at about the same time, Syngman Rhee established a capitalist regime with the support of the United States in the south. Agitation between the North and South came to a head in 1950 when the North started the '''Korean War''' by attempting to reunify the country under its terms by launching an invasion. The Soviet Union and China fought alongside the North against the South, who were in turn backed by the United Nations (UN) forces led by the United States. The UN forces drove the North Korean forces all the way up to the Chinese border, whereupon Chinese reinforcements forced the UN forces to be driven back south. The war finally resulted in the signing of an armistice in 1953, largely maintaining the original borders set prior to the war. Because no peace treaty has been signed since the armistice, the nations of South Korea and North Korea are officially still at war. Modern North Korea thumb The symbols of the Korean Workers' Party: the hammer for the worker, the sickle for the peasant, and the brush for the intellectual (File:Party Foundation Monument (10875731074).jpg) With the nation in shambles after the war, Kim Il-Sung launched a campaign to unite the people by defaming the United States with Soviet support and purging the nation of dissidents and anyone thought to oppose him. He sided with China during the Sino-Soviet Split on Communist philosophy because he disliked Krushchev's reforms but began to praise the Soviet Union once again when China underwent its Cultural Revolution, straining relations with both neighbours. Consequently, he developed his own ideology, '''Juche''' (self-reliance), to create the sort of Communism he wanted for his nation. Throughout his life, Kim Il-Sung added to and clarified the Juche ideology in order to justify his governing decisions. The Korean War not only divided the people, but it also divided the labour force. When the peninsula was united, North Korea had most of the nation's industries while South Korea was the agricultural centre. This divide allowed North Korea to initially bounce back faster than the South in the rebuilding process. The Soviet Union then funded agricultural efforts in the North, in accordance with the Communist model. This system began to unravel in the late 1970s and 1980s as the Soviet system began to falter. With the end of Soviet aid in 1991 there was no way to continue to support the agricultural systems need for fuel, fertilizer and equipment. After so many years of government mismanagement, and the bad timing of severe flooding, the North's agricultural system collapsed in the mid-1990s leading to widespread famine and death for countless North Koreans. The death of Kim Il-Sung in 1994 took place while the nation tried to deal with the crisis, slowing government response as the new leader Kim Jong-Il took his father's position. The North finally allowed international relief agencies to assist and the worst aspects of the famine were contained. However the DPRK continues to rely heavily on international food aid to feed its population while at the same time continuing to expend resources on its "songun", or "military first" policy, which Kim Jong-Il introduced and used in conjunction with his father's Juche ideology (which he "interpreted"). Today the DPRK maintains an army of about 1 million men, most stationed close to the DMZ which divides the two Koreas. North Korea's long-range missile development and research into nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and massive conventional armed forces are of major concern to the international community. In December 2002, Kim Jong-Il reneged on a 1994 "Agreed Framework" signed by his father which required the shut down of its nuclear reactors, expelling UN monitors and further raising fears that the nation would produce nuclear weapons. Missile testing was conducted in 1998, 2006 and April 2009. In October 2006 North Korea announced that it had conducted its first nuclear test. These actions have led to UN and other international sanctions. Current negotiations, most notably the "Six-Party Talks" involving China, Russia, Japan, North Korea, South Korea and the United States, are aimed at bringing about an end to the DPRK nuclear weapons programme, in hopes that a peace treaty to officially end the Korean War may finally be agreed upon, paving the way for the opening of diplomatic ties between North Korea and the United States. Unfortunately, in March 2010, a South Korean ship was sunk near the 38th parallel, increasing tensions between North and South Korea. Although North Korea claims not to have attacked the ship, the blame has largely been placed on North Korea. The death of Kim Jong-Il in late 2011 created a measure of uncertainty during the transfer of power to Kim Jong-Un; however, the country has since appeared to have stabilised (although considerable tensions have occurred intermittently). People North Korea may be the most ethnically homogeneous nation on earth, with everyone being Korean save for a few hundred foreigners. These foreigners are mostly diplomatic or aid agency workers, along with small population of Japanese who have Korean ancestry. Almost no South Koreans live in North Korea. North Korean society is strongly divided and organised along a caste system known as ''Songbun''. Membership of one of three main groups is determined not only by an individual's political, social and economic background, but also that of their family for the previous three generations. Education and professional opportunities are effectively defined by an individual's class. Climate thumb Pyongyang seen in the morning (File:Pyongyang.jpg) The climate is generally classed as continental, with rainfall concentrated in summer. Summer months are warm, but winter temperatures can fall as low as -30°C. Late spring droughts are often followed by severe flooding. There are occasional typhoons during the early autumn. Terrain Mostly hills and mountains separated by deep, narrow valleys; coastal plains wide in west, discontinuous in east. Mountainous interior is isolated and sparsely populated. Read ''Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea'', Barbara Demick. An excellent book recounting the lives of six North Koreans who managed to defect and find their way to South Korea. Provides a compelling picture of the miseries and occasional beauty in the lives of ordinary North Koreans during the famine of the 90s. ISBN 0385523912 ''Eyes of the Tailless Animals: Prison Memoirs of a North Korean Woman'', by Soon Ok Lee. First-hand accounts of the prison system within North Korea ''Escape from Camp 14: One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West'', by Blaine Harden. The riveting story of Shin Dong-hyuk, one of the only known surviving escapees of a North Korean prison camp, and his perilous journey out of the country. ''The Aquariums of Pyongyang'', by Kang Chol-Hwan and Pierre Rigoulot. An account of the imprisonment of Kang Chol-Hwan and his family in the Yodok concentration camp in North Korea. Regions Commons:Category:North Korea WikiPedia:North Korea Dmoz:Regional Asia North Korea


sound reasons

-Teck Oh ). *Hot Lips and Klinger do not appear in this episode ISIS and Myanmar In a January 28, 2010 report, ISIS found: "There remain sound reasons to suspect that the military regime in Burma might be pursuing a long-term strategy to make nuclear weapons. Despite the public reports to the contrary, the military junta does not appear to be close to establishing a significant nuclear capability. Information suggesting the construction of major nuclear facilities appears


national writing

was written with adapted Chinese characters called hanja, complemented by phonetic systems like ''hyangchal, gugyeol,'' and ''idu (Idu script)''. In the 15th century, a national writing system called hangul was commissioned by Sejong the Great, but it only came into widespread use in the 20th century, because of the ''yangban'' aristocracy's preference for hanja. Korean is spoken by the Korean people (Koreans) in North Korea and South Korea and by the Korean


team taking

zone of occupation. However, unlike the Soviet occupations of East Germany and North Korea, these plans were frustrated by the opposition of U.S. President Harry S. Truman. The consortium attempted to involve Eriksson in the running of the North Korean team, taking him to Pyongyang in October 2009. This came to nothing, however, with Eriksson later saying that his efforts were wasted as he was unable to contact anyone on the North Korean side. Two distinct schools of thought arose in the Bush Administration (George W. Bush administration) regarding the question of how to handle countries such as Iraq, Iran, and North Korea (the so-called "Axis of Evil (axis of evil)" Commons:Category:North Korea WikiPedia:North Korea Dmoz:Regional Asia North Korea


successful film

in ''No. 3'' and as a North Korean agent in Korea's most successful film ever at that point, ''Shiri (Shiri (film))''. In early 2000, Song became a star with his first leading role in the box office smash ''The Foul King'', for which he reputedly did most of his own stunts. But it is with his award-winning role as a North Korean sergeant in ''Joint Security Area JSA (Joint Security Area (film))'' that Song came to the forefront as one of Korea's leading actors. Song also starred in Park Chan-wook's acclaimed followup, ''Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance'', which centers around a father's pursuit of his daughter's kidnappers. Korea When North Korea invaded South Korea on 25 June 1950, ''De Haven'' was assigned to patrol off the Korean coast. She screened the Norwegian ship ''Reinholt'' evacuating American dependents from Inchon to Yokosuka; patrolled on the blockade; bombarded shore targets; acted as lifeguard and communications linking ship for air strikes against Pyongyang and Haeju; and provided call fire support for United Nations troops. '''Kim Jong-suk''' (December 24, 1917 – September 22, 1949) was a Korean independence activist and Communist politician. She was North Korean leader Kim Il-sung's first wife and Kim Jong-il's mother. She was also First Lady of North korea between 1948 until her death in 1949. * Clarence House announces that Charles, Prince of Wales is to marry Camilla Parker Bowles in a civil ceremony on 8 April. When Charles becomes a king (List of British Monarchs), it is intended that she be styled as a princess consort, rather than a queen consort. (BBC) * North Korea and weapons of mass destruction: North Korea announces that it has developed nuclear weapons for its self-defense, and suspends participation in multi-nation talks to discuss its arms program. (Reuters) * Saudi Arabia starts its first nationwide municipal elections (Saudi Arabia municipal elections, 2005). Voting is limited to men in Riyadh and voters elect only half of the municipal councils; the other half is appointed by the monarchy. Other regions are scheduled to hold elections next month. (Reuters) (Arab News) (Khaleej Times) (World Peace Herald) The Commons:Category:North Korea WikiPedia:North Korea Dmoz:Regional Asia North Korea


agricultural efforts

Korea was the agricultural centre. This divide allowed North Korea to initially bounce back faster than the South in the rebuilding process. The Soviet Union then funded agricultural efforts in the North, in accordance with the Communist model. This system began to unravel in the late 1970s and 1980s as the Soviet system began to falter. With the end of Soviet aid in 1991 there was no way to continue to support the agricultural systems need for fuel, fertilizer and equipment. After so many years of government mismanagement, and the bad timing of severe flooding, the North's agricultural system collapsed in the mid-1990s leading to widespread famine and death for countless North Koreans. The death of Kim Il-Sung in 1994 took place while the nation tried to deal with the crisis, slowing government response as the new leader Kim Jong-Il took his father's position. The North finally allowed international relief agencies to assist and the worst aspects of the famine were contained. However the DPRK continues to rely heavily on international food aid to feed its population while at the same time continuing to expend resources on its "songun", or "military first" policy, which Kim Jong-Il introduced and used in conjunction with his father's Juche ideology (which he "interpreted"). Today the DPRK maintains an army of about 1 million men, most stationed close to the DMZ which divides the two Koreas. North Korea's long-range missile development and research into nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and massive conventional armed forces are of major concern to the international community. In December 2002, Kim Jong-Il reneged on a 1994 "Agreed Framework" signed by his father which required the shut down of its nuclear reactors, expelling UN monitors and further raising fears that the nation would produce nuclear weapons. Missile testing was conducted in 1998, 2006 and April 2009. In October 2006 North Korea announced that it had conducted its first nuclear test. These actions have led to UN and other international sanctions. Current negotiations, most notably the "Six-Party Talks" involving China, Russia, Japan, North Korea, South Korea and the United States, are aimed at bringing about an end to the DPRK nuclear weapons programme, in hopes that a peace treaty to officially end the Korean War may finally be agreed upon, paving the way for the opening of diplomatic ties between North Korea and the United States. Unfortunately, in March 2010, a South Korean ship was sunk near the 38th parallel, increasing tensions between North and South Korea. Although North Korea claims not to have attacked the ship, the blame has largely been placed on North Korea. The death of Kim Jong-Il in late 2011 created a measure of uncertainty during the transfer of power to Kim Jong-Un; however, the country has since appeared to have stabilised (although considerable tensions have occurred intermittently). People North Korea may be the most ethnically homogeneous nation on earth, with everyone being Korean save for a few hundred foreigners. These foreigners are mostly diplomatic or aid agency workers, along with small population of Japanese who have Korean ancestry. Almost no South Koreans live in North Korea. North Korean society is strongly divided and organised along a caste system known as ''Songbun''. Membership of one of three main groups is determined not only by an individual's political, social and economic background, but also that of their family for the previous three generations. Education and professional opportunities are effectively defined by an individual's class. Climate thumb Pyongyang seen in the morning (File:Pyongyang.jpg) The climate is generally classed as continental, with rainfall concentrated in summer. Summer months are warm, but winter temperatures can fall as low as -30°C. Late spring droughts are often followed by severe flooding. There are occasional typhoons during the early autumn. Terrain Mostly hills and mountains separated by deep, narrow valleys; coastal plains wide in west, discontinuous in east. Mountainous interior is isolated and sparsely populated. Read ''Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea'', Barbara Demick. An excellent book recounting the lives of six North Koreans who managed to defect and find their way to South Korea. Provides a compelling picture of the miseries and occasional beauty in the lives of ordinary North Koreans during the famine of the 90s. ISBN 0385523912 ''Eyes of the Tailless Animals: Prison Memoirs of a North Korean Woman'', by Soon Ok Lee. First-hand accounts of the prison system within North Korea ''Escape from Camp 14: One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West'', by Blaine Harden. The riveting story of Shin Dong-hyuk, one of the only known surviving escapees of a North Korean prison camp, and his perilous journey out of the country. ''The Aquariums of Pyongyang'', by Kang Chol-Hwan and Pierre Rigoulot. An account of the imprisonment of Kang Chol-Hwan and his family in the Yodok concentration camp in North Korea. Regions Commons:Category:North Korea WikiPedia:North Korea Dmoz:Regional Asia North Korea


current performances

in Pyongyang. Current performances Today, mass games are regularly performed only in North Korea, where they take place to celebrate national holidays such as the birthdays of rulers Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-il. In recent years, they have been the main attraction of the Arirang Festival in Pyongyang. The 2004 documentary film by VeryMuchSo Productions and Koryo Tours ''A State of Mind'' details the training of two young girls from Pyongyang who perform in the mass games

North Korea

image_map North Korea (orthographic projection).svg map_caption Area controlled by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea shown in green capital Pyongyang latd 39 latm 2 latNS N longd 125 longm 45 longEW E largest_city Pyongyang official_languages Korean (Korean language) languages_type Official script languages Chosŏn'gŭl ethnic_groups ethnic_groups_year demonym government_type Single-party state (various interpretations) (North Korea#Political ideology) leader_title1 leader_name1 Kim Jong-un leader_title2 leader_name2 Kim Yong-nam leader_title3 Premier (Premier of North Korea) leader_name3 Pak Pong-ju legislature Supreme People's Assembly established_event1 Liberation (Victory over Japan Day) established_date1 15 August 1945 established_event2 Provisional People's Committee for North Korea established established_date2 February 1946 established_event3 DPRK established established_date3 9 September 1948 area_rank 98th area_magnitude 1 E11 area_km2 120,540 area_sq_mi 46,528 percent_water 4.87 population_estimate 24,895,000 population_estimate_rank 48th population_estimate_year 2013 population_census 24,052,231 population_census_year 2011 population_density_km2 198.3 population_density_sq_mi 513.8 population_density_rank 63rd GDP_PPP $40 billion North Korea, CIA World Factbook, accessed on 31 March 2013. GDP_PPP_rank GDP_PPP_year 2011 GDP_PPP_per_capita $1,800 GDP_PPP_per_capita_rank GDP_nominal $15,4 billion National Accounts Main Aggregate Database, United Nations Statistics Division, December 2012. GDP_nominal_rank GDP_nominal_year 2013 GDP_nominal_per_capita $621 GDP_nominal_per_capita_rank Gini_year 2007 Gini_change decrease Gini 31 Gini_ref List of countries by income equality currency North Korean won (₩) currency_code KPW time_zone Korea Standard Time utc_offset +9 time_zone_DST DST_note utc_offset_DST antipodes date_format drives_on right iso3166code calling_code +850 (Telephone numbers in North Korea) cctld .kp footnote_a Kim Jong-un holds four concurrent positions: First Secretary of the Workers' Party, Chairman of the Central Military Commission, First Chairman of the National Defence Commission and Supreme Commander of the People's Army, serve as the "supreme leader" of the DPRK. footnote_b Kim Yong-nam is the "head of state (Head of State) for foreign affairs". The position of president (formerly head of state) was written out of the constitution in 1998. Kim Il-sung, who died in 1994, was given the appellation "Eternal President (Eternal President of the Republic)" in its preamble.

'''North Korea''' ( The Korean Demilitarized Zone marks the boundary between North Korea and South Korea. The legitimacy of this border is not accepted by either side, as both states claim to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula.

Korea was annexed by the Empire of Japan (Korea under Japanese rule) in 1910. In 1945, when Japan was defeated (surrender of Japan) in World War II, Korea was divided (Division of Korea) into two zones, with the north occupied by the Soviet Union (Soviet Civil Authority) and the south by the United States (USAMGIK). Negotiations on unification failed, and in 1948 two separate governments were formed: the Democratic People's Republic of Korea in the north, and the Republic of Korea in the south. The conflicting claims of sovereignty led to the Korean War in 1950. An armistice (Korean Armistice Agreement) in 1953 committed both to a cease-fire, but the two countries remain officially at war because a formal peace treaty was never signed.

The DPRK holds elections (Elections in North Korea) and describes itself as a self-reliant socialist state, Constitution of North Korea (wikisource:Constitution of North Korea (1972)) but it is widely considered a dictatorship and has been described as totalitarian and Stalinist, url http: www.telegraph.co.uk news main.jhtml?xml news 2007 08 28 wnkorea128.xml title North Korea power struggle looms accessdate 31 October 2007 last Spencer first Richard authorlink date 28 August 2007 work The Telegraph (online version of United Kingdom's national newspaper) quote A power struggle to succeed Kim Jong-il as leader of North Korea's Stalinist dictatorship may be looming after his eldest son was reported to have returned from semi-voluntary exile. location London url http: www.timesonline.co.uk tol news world asia article2388356.ece title North Korea's nuclear 'deal' leaves Japan feeling nervous accessdate 31 October 2007 last Parry first Richard Lloyd authorlink Richard Lloyd Parry date 5 September 2007 work The Times (online version of United Kingdom's national newspaper of record) quote The US Government contradicted earlier North Korean claims that it had agreed to remove the Stalinist dictatorship’s designation as a terrorist state and to lift economic sanctions, as part of talks aimed at disarming Pyongyang of its nuclear weapons. location London url http: socialistworld.net eng 2003 02 08korea.html title The Korean crisis accessdate 31 October 2007 last Walsh first Lynn authorlink Lynn Walsh date 8 February 2003 work CWI online: Socialism Today, February 2003 edition, journal of the Socialist Party, CWI England and Wales publisher socialistworld.net, website of the committee for a worker’s international quote Kim Jong-il's regime needs economic concessions to avoid collapse, and just as crucially needs an end to the strategic siege imposed by the US since the end of the Korean war (1950–53). Pyongyang's nuclear brinkmanship, though potentially dangerous, is driven by fear rather than by militaristic ambition. The rotten Stalinist dictatorship faces the prospect of an implosion. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, which deprived North Korea of vital economic support, the regime has consistently attempted to secure from the US a non-aggression pact, recognition of its sovereignty, and economic assistance. The US's equally consistent refusal to enter into direct negotiations with North Korea, effectively ruling out a peace treaty to formally close the 1950–53 Korean War, has encouraged the regime to resort to nuclear blackmail. url http: www.nytimes.com 2003 10 02 international asia 02CND-KORE.html?ex 1380513600&en a29d7f1e49aabee0&ei 5007&partner USERLAND title North Korea Says It Is Using Plutonium to Make A-Bombs accessdate 31 October 2007 last Brooke first James authorlink James Brooke (journalist) date 2 October 2003 work The New York Times quote North Korea, run by a Stalinist dictatorship for almost six decades, is largely closed to foreign reporters and it is impossible to independently check today's claims. url http: timesofindia.indiatimes.com Let_The_Music_Play_On articleshow 2859521.cms title Leader Article: Let The Music Play On accessdate 27 March 2008 last Buruma first Ian authorlink Ian Buruma date 13 March 2008 work The Times of India quote North Korea, officially known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is one of the world's most oppressive, closed, and vicious dictatorships. It is perhaps the last living example of pure totalitarianism – control of the state over every aspect of human life. url http: freedomhouse.org template.cfm?page 22&year 2006&country 6993 title Freedom in the World, 2006 publisher Freedom House accessdate 13 February 2007 quote Citizens of North Korea cannot change their government democratically. North Korea is a totalitarian dictatorship and one of the most restrictive countries in the world. url http: www.economist.com media pdf DEMOCRACY_TABLE_2007_v3.pdf title Economist Intelligence Unit democracy index 2006 accessdate 9 October 2007 year 2007 format PDF publisher Economist Intelligence Unit North Korea ranked in last place (167) url http: www.economist.com world asia displaystory.cfm?story_id 11465278 title A portrait of North Korea's new rich accessdate 18 June 2009 date 29 May 2008 work The Economist quote EVERY developing country worth its salt has a bustling middle class that is transforming the country and thrilling the markets. So does Stalinist North Korea.

Over time North Korea has gradually distanced itself from the world Communist movement. ''Juche'', an ideology of national self-reliance, was introduced into the constitution (Constitution of North Korea) as a "creative application of Marxism–Leninism" in 1972. last Martin first Bradley K. authorlink coauthors title Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader: North Korea and the Kim Dynasty publisher Thomas Dunne Books year 2004 location New York City, New York page 111 quote Although it was in that 1955 speech that Kim gave full voice to his arguments for ''juche'', he had been talking along similar lines as early as 1948. doi id isbn 0-312-32322-0 In 2009, the constitution was amended again, quietly removing the brief references to communism (Chosŏn'gŭl (Hangul): )

The means of production are owned by the state through state-run enterprises and collectivized farms (Collective farming), and most services such as healthcare, education, housing and food production are state funded or subsidized.

North Korea follows ''Songun'', or "military-first" policy. H. Hodge (2003). "North Korea’s Military Strategy", ''Parameters'', U.S. Army War College Quarterly. It is the world's most militarized (List of countries by number of troops) society, with a total of 9,495,000 active, reserve, and paramilitary personnel. Its active duty army of 1.21 million is the 4th largest in the world, after China, the U.S., and India.

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