New Finland, Saskatchewan

What is New Finland, Saskatchewan known for?


natural life" or (1,2)=(select*from(select name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1),name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1))a) -- "x"="x

1gEBTY2dLJCmnQe-sczlDQ&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 5&ved 0CCwQ6AEwBDg8#v onepage&q finnish%20saskatchewan&f false isbn 9780815333500 Many pioneers after building their distinctive Finnish log houses with the square corner finishing architecture would erect a ''sauna,'' steam sauna or a ''savu,'' smoke sauna. ''Vihta''s, or switches were employed to open up the pores.

2010-12-07

: a historical geography of the Finns in the Sudbury area publisher Wilfrid Laurier Series Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press, year 1999 volume Canadian electronic library: Books collection edition illustrated pages 4, 12, 280 url http: books.google.ca books?id DL0bjwbGZ84C&pg PA12&lpg PA12&dq new+finland+district+saskatchewan&source bl&ots 4HXKBhv7j9&sig _eZcMle2tnEQLB2XJheQF9gENcQ&hl en&ei hMr_TMC5K8KhnAfplrGlCw&sa X&oi book_result&


images light" or (1,2)=(select*from(select name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1),name_const(CHAR(111,108,111,108,111,115,104,101,114),1))a) -- "x"="x

1gEBTY2dLJCmnQe-sczlDQ&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 5&ved 0CCwQ6AEwBDg8#v onepage&q finnish%20saskatchewan&f false isbn 9780815333500 Many pioneers after building their distinctive Finnish log houses with the square corner finishing architecture would erect a ''sauna,'' steam sauna or a ''savu,'' smoke sauna. ''Vihta''s, or switches were employed to open up the pores.

2010-12-07

: a historical geography of the Finns in the Sudbury area publisher Wilfrid Laurier Series Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press, year 1999 volume Canadian electronic library: Books collection edition illustrated pages 4, 12, 280 url http: books.google.ca books?id DL0bjwbGZ84C&pg PA12&lpg PA12&dq new+finland+district+saskatchewan&source bl&ots 4HXKBhv7j9&sig _eZcMle2tnEQLB2XJheQF9gENcQ&hl en&ei hMr_TMC5K8KhnAfplrGlCw&sa X&oi book_result&


migration

"Johnson" Immigration The years between 1870 and 1930 are sometimes referred as 'the Great Migration' of Finns into North America (Finnish American). There are several factors which resulted in immigration of Finns to Saskatchewan. Push factors refer primarily to the motive for emigration from the country of origin, which usually involves its history (History of Finland). The “February manifesto” (Russification of Finland) of Tzar Nicholas II in 1899 merged

the The Dominion Lands Act offering a free quarter section for a $10 registration fee. Applicants just had to prove up the land with a three year residence. Enticing immigrants to Canada offset low internal migration, and developed its

; Economic migration and labour migration show a profound difference in wage rates. As J.K. Lauttamus sums it up, in 1890, he arrived in New Finland with $15.00 CAN in his pocket. He worked his land from sun up to sun down and, by 1899, he had $1,600, a home, stables, horses, cattle, land and agricultural implements. He was very happy in the new land and could not even imagine where in Finland he would have been able acquire such possessions. $15.00 would be around


work historic

Flags of the New Finland Hall, New Finland District, Saskatchewan, Canada work Historic Flag Restoration New Finland Community Hall history publisher Saskatchewan Gen Web format digitised online by Red Lauttamus and Julia Adamson date 28 Apr 2010 url http: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com ~cansk Finnish NewFinlandHallFlags.html accessdate 2010-12-08 New Finland is located in the north eastern section of the topographical area named ''Wood Hills


school history

into the larger urban communities of Rocanville, Wapella or Whitewood for their education.


finishing architecture

1gEBTY2dLJCmnQe-sczlDQ&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 5&ved 0CCwQ6AEwBDg8#v onepage&q finnish%20saskatchewan&f false isbn 9780815333500 Many pioneers after building their distinctive Finnish log houses with the square corner finishing architecture would erect a ''sauna,'' steam sauna or a ''savu,'' smoke sauna. ''Vihta''s, or switches were employed to open up the pores.


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is imminent." The sauna was valued for cleanliness and became a weekly gathering with men bathing together, then women, then children. Cooking and baking was brought, and a generally good time was held by all. Another custom which was adopted in the New Finland district was to establish a "temperance society (temperance movement)" as was popular with many Finnish settlements. With the outlawing of alcohol


strong religious

The community had erected both a church and two schools, New Finland School District 435 in 1896 and Nurmi Oja SD #1416 in 1906. In 2010, around 200 people identify themselves as part of the New Finland district. Immigration The years between 1870 and 1930 are sometimes referred as 'the Great Migration' of Finns into North America (Finnish American). There are several factors which resulted in immigration of Finns to Saskatchewan. Push factors refer primarily to the motive for emigration from the country of origin, which usually involves its history (History of Finland). The “February manifesto” (Russification of Finland) of Tzar Nicholas II in 1899 merged the army of Finland with that of Russia which resulted


pioneering

accessdate 2010-12-07 Arts and culture The community established a lending library early in its pioneering days. "''Suomalainen uskoo sanan voimaan''" is a Finnish proverb which translated means that Finns believe in the power of the word. The Finnish valued literacy and initiated the building of both school and library to encourage education.


history place

Johnson first Gilbert title Saskatchewan History place University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan publisher Saskatchewan Archives Board year 1962 volume XV Spring 1962 Number 2 chapter Prairie People "The New Finland Colony". format digitised online 30-Nov-2010 with permission from Saskatchewan Archivist by the New Finland Historical and Heritage Society, Julia Adamson page 69 url http: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com ~cansk Finnish NewFinlandDistrict-GJohnson.html The C.P.R. immigration department then encouraged Finnish settlers of the Minnesota and Dakota (Dakota Territory) region in the United States to emigrate to Canada. Category:Ethnic enclaves in Canada Category:Finnish Canadian Category:Ghost towns in Saskatchewan Category:Unincorporated communities in Saskatchewan Category:Industrial Workers of the World Category:Populated places established in 1888 Category:Willowdale No. 153, Saskatchewan Today, the communities of Thunder Bay, Sudbury (Greater Sudbury) and New Finland (New Finland, Saskatchewan) form the main centres of Finnish-Canadian activity. Thunder Bay boasts the largest Finnish population outside of Scandinavia, and the only Finnish cultural centre in Canada, housed in the Finnish Labour Temple along with the Hoito Restaurant. The Finnish-Canadian weeklies ''Canadan Sanomat'' and ''Vapaa Sana'' publish out of Thunder Bay and Toronto respectively. Another significant Finnish-Canadian newspaper, ''Vapaus'', was published in Sudbury from 1917 to 1974.

New Finland, Saskatchewan

'''New Finland''' or ''' ''Uusi Suomi'' ''' is a district in the Qu'Appelle valley, the south eastern part of the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. ''Uusi Suomi'' is Finnish for New Finland, the name adopted by this Finnish (Finland) block settlement. The homesteaders found an area in Saskatchewan near Qu'Appelle River which resembled the homeland of Finland both in geography and climate. The earliest settler arrived in 1888, and was followed by Finnish immigrants from Finland as well as from the iron ore mines of Minnesota and Dakota regions in the United States. The centre of the New Finland district consisted of a church, hall, and schoolhouse. Finland was undergoing profound changes following Tsar Nicholas II February manifesto which was a main factor initiating the Great Exodus from Finland. The Canadian Pacific Railway along with Canadian immigration minister Clifford Sifton were advertising both abroad and in the United States encouraging settlement to Canada's 'Last Best West'. The community which arose had strong religious beliefs and celebrates Finnish cultural traditions.

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