Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen

What is Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen known for?


history place

were allowed to subsist into the following year. On April 12, 1933 Theodor Lewald gave in to the Nazi authorities and resigned as leader of the German Sports Office after it was revealed his paternal grandmother was Jewish. The History Place; Triumph of Hitler The Nazi minister of the interior Wilhelm Frick, interfered with the process of the election of a new Sports leader and the decision was made by a hurriedly-instituted three-men commission. Thus, in April 1933, Hans von Tschammer und Osten, a figure formerly unknown in German sports, was named ''Reichskommissar für Turnen und Sport'' (Commissioner for Gymnastics and Sports of the Reich). Von Tschammer, however, would keep his predecessor in a high position in the sports body, and years later he would appoint Theodor Lewald as president of the Organizing Committee of the Berlin Olympic Games. Hans von Tschammer und Osten was a SA (Sturmabteilung) group leader and promoter of Nazism. In the name of ''gleichschaltung'' he disbanded the ''Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen'' on May 5, 1933 (officially on May 10). Von Tschammer was then elevated to ''Reichssportführer'' on July 19 and the whole sports sphere in Germany was placed under his power. Sports and propaganda in Nazi Germany: The Aryan ideal The '''Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen''' ('''DRL''') was established on July 27, 1934 as the official Sports governing body of the Third Reich. It would quickly become a formidable system within the German nation. After the DRL's foundation all other German sport associations gradually lost their freedom and were coopted into the DRL as mere units ("Fachämter"). Even the most prestigious ones, like the German Football Association (DFB) lost their independence. Havemann, Nils (2006) ''Fußball unterm Hakenkreuz. Der DFB zwischen Sport, Politik und Kommerz Bonn: Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung'' 1933-45 Chronik Rückblick mit scheinbaren Analogien und ohne Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit Von Tschammer's goal was to build a formidable Nazi sports body to which all German sports associations would be submitted. His vision was that physical exercise would ''"improve the morale and productivity of German workers"'' as well as making sports a source of national pride for the Germans. Sporting skills were made a criterion for school graduation as well as a necessary qualification for certain jobs and admission to universities. Bruce Campbell, ''The SA Generals and the Rise of Nazism'' Among the controversial measures taken by the Sports Office of the Reich at the time, the staging of the massive Reichssportfest event on Trinity Sunday was a decision that shocked devout Catholics. Kurt Josef Wecker, ''Themenheft Gemeinde 48: Rituale für Fernstehende'' Bergmoser & Höller Verlag, Aachen In 1935 journalist Guido von Mengden, was named public relations officer of the Reich Sports Office. He became the personal advisor and consultant of the ''Reichssportführer'' in 1936. A committed Nazi, von Mengden became the chief editor of '''NS-Sport''', the official organ of the Reich Sports Office. Bernett, Hajo (1976), ''Guido von Mengden "Generalsstabschef" des deutschen Sports'', Verlag Bartels & Wernitz. Other DRL NSRL publications included ''Dietwart'', a sports magazine with excellent illustrations and ''Sport und Staat'' (Sports and State), a massive four-volume Nazi propaganda report on the organized sports activities in the Third Reich. ''Sport und Staat'' was made by Arno Breitmeyer and Hitler's personal photographer Heinrich Hoffmann. This lavishly illustrated work had many pictures and information about the various Nazi organizations, i.e. SA (Sturmabteilung), NSKK (National Socialist Motor Corps), Bund Deutscher Mädel, Hitler Jugend, etc. Printed in 1934 by the publishing house of the German Sports Aid Funds, a branch of the DRL, only volume one and two of a planned series of four volumes were published. 'Sport und Staat The aims of the promotion of sports in the Third Reich included hardening the spirit of every German as well as making German citizens feel that they were part of a wider national purpose. This was in line with the ideals of Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, the "Father of physical exercises", who connected the steeling of one's own body to a healthy spirit and promoted the idea of a unified, strong Germany. Turnverein Riesel, History A more controversial aim was the demonstration of Aryan physical superiority (Racial policy of Nazi Germany). Liz Jewitt ''How successful was Nazi propaganda''. Von Tschammer's impressively staged events of sports pageantry not only enhanced the physical activity, but also the nationalism of Germans. Nordic (Nordic race) aesthetic beauty and commitment to Germanic ideals of race (Master race) went hand in hand during the Third Reich, and von Tschammer und Osten implemented a policy of racial exclusion within sports. Athletes of Jewish origin were excluded from participation in relevant sporting events. Von Tschammer's biography 1936 Olympic Games: Zenith of the Nazi Sports Office In 1936 Hans von Tschammer und Osten, as the head of the Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen, played a major role in the structure and coordination of the Summer Olympics (1936 Summer Olympics) in Berlin. The Olympic games, the first in history to have live television coverage, provided an ideal setting to showcase the Nazi regime and what Hitler deemed to be his exploits. As Secretary General of the Organizing Committee of the Berlin Olympic Games, Carl Diem, the former secretary of the Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (DRA), the forerunner of the DRL NSRL, became the chief organizer of the Berlin Olympic Games. Diem held high posts in the Reichs Sports office even after the Olympics, being named leader of the Foreign Department of the Nationalsocialist Sports Office in 1939 by the ''Reichssportführer''. As such Carl Diem was responsible for the issues of German athletes in foreign countries, as well as for the international affairs of the NSRL. Der "politische Sturm" um Carl Diem als Leiter der Sporthochschule Köln The 1936 Winter Olympics were organized on behalf of the Sports Office of the Third Reich (Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen) (DRL) by Karl Ritter von Halt. Von Halt had been named President of the Committee for the organization of the Fourth Winter Olympics in Garmisch by ''Reichssportführer'' Hans von Tschammer und Osten. Doctrine The HJ were viewed as future "Aryan (Aryan race) supermen" and were indoctrinated in anti-Semitism. One aim was to instill the motivation that would enable HJ members, as soldiers, to fight faithfully for the Third Reich. The HJ put more emphasis on physical (body) and military training than on academic study. Hakim 1995 The ''Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen'' (NSRBL), the umbrella organization promoting and coordinating sport activities in Germany during the Nazi period, had the responsibility of overseeing the physical fitness development programs provided to the German youth. "Hitlerjugend: An In-Depth History." ''axishistory.com''. Retrieved: 1 February 2010. Carl Diem became the secretary of the all-German sports organization Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (:de:Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen) (DRL) the forerunner of the Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen, the Sports Organ of the Third Reich.


sports life

, among them youngsters in their early teens, had to go to fight to the fronts. Since players were not available, except in shoddily-organized military sports events in scattered frontline locations, sports life in Germany came practically to a standstill. The last ''von Tschammer und Osten Pokal'' football trophy was played in Vienna in 1943 and the following two years plunged the NSRL into irrelevance. The once mighty Nazi Sports Body had to give up its weight and its position of pride long


summer games'

*1936 Summer Olympics *1936 Winter Olympics *Gauliga *Deutscher Olympischer Sportbund *Hitler Youth *Yacht-Club von Deutschland *The Death Match Further reading * Anti-Semitism at the 1936 Olympics *Arno Breitmeyer & Heinrich Hoffmann, ''Sport und Staat. Im Auftrage des Reichssportführers'' (2 vols). Sport und Staat *Werner Gärtner, ''Volk in Leibesübungen. Deutsches Turn- und Sportfest, Breslau 1938''. Commissioned by the Reichssportführer. *Guido Von


games

Army parent_agency Reich Ministry of the Interior (nominally) child1_agency child2_agency child3_agency child4_agency website footnotes thumb Berlin, gate of the Olympic Stadium (File:Berlin olympiastadion main entrance olympic rings dec 2004.jpg) thumb DRL membership booklet cover. The German eagle became the emblem of the DRL after the 1936 Olympic Games. (File:DRLmembership-booklet.png) File:ArnoBrekerDiePartei.jpg thumb The idea

(1944–1945). History Forerunner organizations The 1916 Summer Olympics had been awarded to Berlin, but were canceled because of the duration of World War I. The ''Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Olympische Spiele (Deutsche Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen)'' (DRA or DRAfOS) ''"German Imperial Commission for Olympic Games"'', was the German Olympic Sports organization at that time. In 1917 the "German Imperial Commission for Olympic Games" was renamed

by a hurriedly-instituted three-men commission. Thus, in April 1933, Hans von Tschammer und Osten, a figure formerly unknown in German sports, was named ''Reichskommissar für Turnen und Sport'' (Commissioner for Gymnastics and Sports of the Reich). Von Tschammer, however, would keep his predecessor in a high position in the sports body, and years later he would appoint Theodor Lewald as president of the Organizing Committee of the Berlin Olympic Games. Hans von Tschammer und Osten


live television" and "x"="x

. The Olympic games, the first in history to have live television coverage, provided an ideal setting to showcase the Nazi regime and what Hitler deemed to be his exploits. As Secretary General of the Organizing Committee of the Berlin Olympic Games, Carl Diem, the former secretary of the Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (DRA), the forerunner of the DRL NSRL, became the chief organizer of the Berlin Olympic Games. Diem held high posts in the Reichs Sports office even after

to the formerly influential branches of the Nazi Sports Office owing to the war-related shifting of priorities.X&oi book_result&resnum 1&ct result Albert Oeckl - sein Leben und Wirken für die deutsche Öffentlichkeitsarbeit During this time the NSRL

Nazification of Sport Many Jews and Gypsies were banned from participating in sporting events, including Jewish four-time world record holder and 10-time German national champion Lilli Henoch.


big event

des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne (1937) 1937 International Exposition in Paris. The 1936 Olympics was meant to display to the world the Aryan superiority of Germany to other nations. German athletes were carefully chosen not only for strength but for Aryan appearance. Anton Rippon, ''Hitler's Olympics: The Story of the 1936 Nazi Games'' (2006) The last big event organised by the Nazi Sports Body (Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen), called Deutsches Turn-und-Sportfest (Deutsches Turn- und Sportfest 1938) (Gym and Sports Festivities), took place in Breslau from 26 to 31 July 1938. The Sportsfest was held to commemorate the 125th anniversary of the German Wars of Liberation against Napoleon's invasion. thumb Adolf Hitler and Hermann Göring at the Berlin Olympics. (File:Berlin 1936 olympiaden.jpg) Hans von Tschammer und Osten, as ''Reichssportführer'', i.e. head of the Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen (Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen) (DRL), the Reich Sports Office, played a major role in the structure and organization of the Olympics. He promoted the idea that the use of sports would harden the German spirit and instill unity among German youth. At the same time he also believed that sports was a "way to weed out the weak, Jewish, and other undesirables." Nazification of Sport Many Jews and Gypsies were banned from participating in sporting events, including Jewish four-time world record holder and 10-time German national champion Lilli Henoch. The 1936 Winter Olympics were organized on behalf of the Sports Office of the Third Reich (Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen) (DRL) by Karl Ritter von Halt. Von Halt had been named President of the Committee for the organization of the Fourth Winter Olympics in Garmisch by ''Reichssportführer'' Hans von Tschammer und Osten. Doctrine The HJ were viewed as future "Aryan (Aryan race) supermen" and were indoctrinated in anti-Semitism. One aim was to instill the motivation that would enable HJ members, as soldiers, to fight faithfully for the Third Reich. The HJ put more emphasis on physical (body) and military training than on academic study. Hakim 1995 The ''Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen'' (NSRBL), the umbrella organization promoting and coordinating sport activities in Germany during the Nazi period, had the responsibility of overseeing the physical fitness development programs provided to the German youth. "Hitlerjugend: An In-Depth History." ''axishistory.com''. Retrieved: 1 February 2010. Carl Diem became the secretary of the all-German sports organization Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (:de:Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen) (DRL) the forerunner of the Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen, the Sports Organ of the Third Reich.


illustrations

Bartels & Wernitz. Other DRL NSRL publications included ''Dietwart'', a sports magazine with excellent illustrations and ''Sport und Staat'' (Sports and State), a massive four-volume Nazi propaganda report on the organized sports activities in the Third Reich. ''Sport und Staat'' was made by Arno Breitmeyer and Hitler's personal photographer Heinrich Hoffmann. This lavishly illustrated work had many pictures and information about the various Nazi organizations, i.e


quot top

. Moreover, even if not duly credited, many of the NSRL's systemic improvements in sports are still in use in today's sports organizations. By Sport border "0" cellpadding "2" - valign "top" * Department 1: Artistic gymnastics, Gymnastics and ''Summer Games'' (1) * Department 2: Football (Association football), Rugby (Rugby union), and Cricket * Department 3: Light athletics (Track and field athletics) * Department 4: Team handball Handball

competences of the NSRL as a league were served by sports federations some of which still exist today: border "0" cellpadding "2" - valign "top" * 16. Deutscher Segler-Verband ''(Sailing)'' * 17. Deutscher Bergsteiger-Verband ''(Mountaineering)'' * 18. Deutscher Wanderverband ''(Hiking)'' * 19. Deutscher Kegler-Bund ''(Bowling)'' * 20. Deutscher Schützen-Verband ''(Shooting)'' * 21. Deutscher Golf-Verband ''(Golf)'' * 22. Bob

.'' By region The regional structure of the NSRL followed the Nazi Party model. Often two or more gaue (Reichsgau) were included in one region where it was expedient to do so. border "0" cellpadding "2" - valign "top" * Region 1: East Prussia * Region 2: Pomerania * Region 3: Berlin-Brandenburg * Region 4: Silesia * Region 5: Saxony * Region 6: Mitte (1) * Region 7: Nordmark (2) * Region 8: Lower Saxony * Region 9: Westphalia


physical

of a "master race" was propagated along with the promotion of physical exercises to look after one's own body and to prepare oneself to be a warrior for the volk thumb The Gaue of Greater Germany. As the Third Reich Expanded, the annexed territories of Austria and parts of Czechoslovakia came under the sphere of the NSRL (File:Reichsgaue.png) File:Nazi Propaganda - V-Deutschland Siegt An Allen Fronten.jpg thumb War propaganda: "Germany wins on all fronts."

: ''National Socialist League of the Reich for Physical Exercise''), known as '''Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen''' ('''DRL''') until 1938, was the umbrella organization for sports during the Third Reich. The NSRL was led by the ''Reichssportführer'', who after 1934 was at the same time presiding over the German National Olympic Committee. The NSRL's leaders were Hans von Tschammer und Osten (1933–1943), Arno Breitmeyer (1943–1944) and Karl Ritter von Halt

Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (:de:Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen) (DRA), (sometimes also DRL or, more rarely, DRAfL) (''"German Imperial Commission for Physical Exercise"''). The name change reflected Germany's protest against the fact that Germany and other Central Powers were being excluded from the "Olympic family" which was dominated by the Entente Powers. Name change


sports activities

Bartels & Wernitz. Other DRL NSRL publications included ''Dietwart'', a sports magazine with excellent illustrations and ''Sport und Staat'' (Sports and State), a massive four-volume Nazi propaganda report on the organized sports activities in the Third Reich. ''Sport und Staat'' was made by Arno Breitmeyer and Hitler's personal photographer Heinrich Hoffmann. This lavishly illustrated work had many pictures and information about the various Nazi organizations, i.e. SA (Sturmabteilung), NSKK (National Socialist Motor Corps), Bund Deutscher Mädel, Hitler Jugend, etc. Printed in 1934 by the publishing house of the German Sports Aid Funds, a branch of the DRL, only volume one and two of a planned series of four volumes were published. 'Sport und Staat The aims of the promotion of sports in the Third Reich included hardening the spirit of every German as well as making German citizens feel that they were part of a wider national purpose. This was in line with the ideals of Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, the "Father of physical exercises", who connected the steeling of one's own body to a healthy spirit and promoted the idea of a unified, strong Germany. Turnverein Riesel, History A more controversial aim was the demonstration of Aryan physical superiority (Racial policy of Nazi Germany). Liz Jewitt ''How successful was Nazi propaganda''. Von Tschammer's impressively staged events of sports pageantry not only enhanced the physical activity, but also the nationalism of Germans. Nordic (Nordic race) aesthetic beauty and commitment to Germanic ideals of race (Master race) went hand in hand during the Third Reich, and von Tschammer und Osten implemented a policy of racial exclusion within sports. Athletes of Jewish origin were excluded from participation in relevant sporting events. Von Tschammer's biography 1936 Olympic Games: Zenith of the Nazi Sports Office In 1936 Hans von Tschammer und Osten, as the head of the Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen, played a major role in the structure and coordination of the Summer Olympics (1936 Summer Olympics) in Berlin. The Olympic games, the first in history to have live television coverage, provided an ideal setting to showcase the Nazi regime and what Hitler deemed to be his exploits. As Secretary General of the Organizing Committee of the Berlin Olympic Games, Carl Diem, the former secretary of the Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (DRA), the forerunner of the DRL NSRL, became the chief organizer of the Berlin Olympic Games. Diem held high posts in the Reichs Sports office even after the Olympics, being named leader of the Foreign Department of the Nationalsocialist Sports Office in 1939 by the ''Reichssportführer''. As such Carl Diem was responsible for the issues of German athletes in foreign countries, as well as for the international affairs of the NSRL. Der "politische Sturm" um Carl Diem als Leiter der Sporthochschule Köln The 1936 Winter Olympics were organized on behalf of the Sports Office of the Third Reich (Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen) (DRL) by Karl Ritter von Halt. Von Halt had been named President of the Committee for the organization of the Fourth Winter Olympics in Garmisch by ''Reichssportführer'' Hans von Tschammer und Osten. Doctrine The HJ were viewed as future "Aryan (Aryan race) supermen" and were indoctrinated in anti-Semitism. One aim was to instill the motivation that would enable HJ members, as soldiers, to fight faithfully for the Third Reich. The HJ put more emphasis on physical (body) and military training than on academic study. Hakim 1995 The ''Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen'' (NSRBL), the umbrella organization promoting and coordinating sport activities in Germany during the Nazi period, had the responsibility of overseeing the physical fitness development programs provided to the German youth. "Hitlerjugend: An In-Depth History." ''axishistory.com''. Retrieved: 1 February 2010. Carl Diem became the secretary of the all-German sports organization Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen (:de:Deutscher Reichsausschuss für Leibesübungen) (DRL) the forerunner of the Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen, the Sports Organ of the Third Reich.

Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen

thumb Berlin, gate of the Olympic Stadium (File:Berlin olympiastadion main entrance olympic rings dec 2004.jpg) thumb DRL membership booklet cover. The German eagle became the emblem of the DRL after the 1936 Olympic Games. (File:DRLmembership-booklet.png) thumb The idea of a "master race (File:ArnoBrekerDiePartei.jpg)" was propagated along with the promotion of physical exercises to look after one's own body and to prepare oneself to be a warrior for the volk thumb The Gaue of Greater Germany. As the Third Reich Expanded, the annexed territories of Austria and parts of Czechoslovakia came under the sphere of the NSRL (File:Reichsgaue.png) thumb War propaganda: "Germany wins on all fronts." War-related triumphalism spelt doom for the once mighty NSRL (File:Nazi Propaganda - V-Deutschland Siegt An Allen Fronten.jpg) thumb Many of the modern improvements of sports events by the DRL NSRL are still in use. Carl Diem's idea: The Olympic fire in Berlin (File:Olympic Fire in Berlin 1936.jpg) thumb Standard of a Gau of the NSRL (File:Reichsbund für Leibesübungen Gaufahne.svg)

thumb NSRL Hanging banner (File:NSRBL Hängefahne.svg) The '''Nationalsozialistischer Reichsbund für Leibesübungen''' ('''NSRL'''), more rarely "NSRBL", (meaning: ''National Socialist League of the Reich for Physical Exercise''), known as '''Deutscher Reichsbund für Leibesübungen''' ('''DRL''') until 1938, was the umbrella organization for sports during the Third Reich.

The NSRL was led by the ''Reichssportführer'', who after 1934 was at the same time presiding over the German National Olympic Committee. The NSRL's leaders were Hans von Tschammer und Osten (1933–1943), Arno Breitmeyer (1943–1944) and Karl Ritter von Halt (1944–1945).

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