National Recovery Administration

What is National Recovery Administration known for?


national industry

; that were negotiated by industries and submitted for government approval under the National Industry Recovery Act of 1933. The argument boils down to assumptions that progressives at the NRA allowed majority coalitions of small, high-cost firms to impose codes in heterogeneous industries, and that these codes were designed by the high-cost firms under an ultimately erroneous belief that they would be enforced by the NRA. Barbara J. Alexander, "Failed Cooperation in Heterogeneous


loyalty

in Baton Rouge. In 1934, he completed his law degree from LSU. After graduation, he moved to New Orleans, where he became an attorney with the National Recovery Administration, a New Deal agency. Thereafter, he was a law partner with both Jacob Morrison and the future Democratic U.S. Representative Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr (Hale Boggs). He was a second cousin of Marie Corinne Morrison Claiborne Boggs (Lindy Boggs), who succeeded her husband Hale Boggs in Congress in 1973. Loyalty

oaths were common during World War II. In support of Roosevelt's National Recovery Administration, 100,000 school children marched to Boston Common and swore a loyalty oath administered by the mayor, "I promise as a good American citizen to do my part for the NRA. I will buy only where the Blue Eagle flies." Another use of loyalty oaths in the United States was during the 1950s and 1960s. The Red Scare (Second Red Scare) during the 1950s and the Congressional hearings chaired


national

The '''National Recovery Administration''' ('''NRA''') was the primary New Deal agency established by U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) in 1933. The goal was to eliminate "cut-throat competition" by bringing industry, labor and government together to create codes of "fair practices" and set prices. The NRA was created by the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) and allowed industries to get together and write "codes of fair competition."

was unconstitutional, ruling that it infringed the separation of powers under the United States Constitution. The NRA quickly stopped operations, but many of its labor provisions reappeared in the National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act), passed later the same year. The long-term result was a surge in the growth and power of unions (Trade union), which became a core of the New Deal Coalition that dominated national politics for the next three decades. The NRA, symbolized by the Blue Eagle


business position

; The business position was summarized by George A. Sloan, head of the Cotton Textile Code Authority: "Maximum hours and minimum wage provisions, useful and necessary as they are in themselves, do not prevent price demoralization. While putting the units of an industry on a fair competitive level insofar as labor costs are concerned, they do not prevent destructive price cutting in the sale of commodities produced, any more than a fixed price of material


quot run

Hugh Johnson (Hugh Samuel Johnson), then head of the National Recovery Administration, gave a speech urging responsible labor leaders to "run these subversive influences out from its ranks like rats". A lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union was kidnapped and beaten, while vigilantes seized thirteen radicals in San Jose (San Jose, California) and turned them over to the sheriff of an adjoining county, who transported them to another county. In Hayward, California


representing big

; Representing big business, the American Liberty League, 1934–40, was run by leading industrialists who opposed the liberalism of the New Deal. Regarding the controversial NRA, the League was ambivalent. Jouett Shouse, the League president, commented that "the NRA has indulged in unwarranted excesses of attempted regulation"; on the other, he added that "in many regards the NRA has served a useful purpose." Ronen Shamir, ''Managing Legal Uncertainty: Elite Lawyers in the New Deal'' (1995) p. 22 Shouse said that he had "deep sympathy" with the goals of the NRA, explaining, "While I feel very strongly that the prohibition of child labor, the maintenance of a minimum wage and the limitation of the hours of work belong under our form of government in the realm of the affairs of the different states, yet I am entirely willing to agree that in the case of an overwhelming national emergency the Federal Government for a limited period should be permitted to assume jurisdiction of them." Shamir, pp 24-25 British journalist Alistair Cooke described Franklin Delano Roosevelt's presidency of the United States of America in the two years from his inauguration to the Supreme Court (Supreme Court of the United States)'s declaration that the National Recovery Administration was unconstitutional (National Recovery Administration#Judicial review), as a benevolent dictatorship.


great amp

The NRA in practice thumb 400px Chart 3: Manufacturing employment in the United States from 1920 to 1940 (File:US Manufacturing Employment Graph - 1920 to 1940.svg)The NRA negotiated


independent oil

to explore the struggle between independent oil producers and major oil producers over production and price controls. *


industry set

; of 1933-4, programs, such as the National Recovery Administration (NRA), sought to stimulate demand and provide work and relief through increased government spending. To end Deflation the Gold standard was suspended and a series of panels comprising business leaders in each industry set regulations which ended what was called "cut-throat competition," believed to be responsible for forcing down prices and profits nationwide. Olivier Blanchard und Gerhard Illing


oil quot

) of the NIRA against producers of "hot oil", oil produced in violation of production restrictions established pursuant to the NIRA, Congress passed , which amended the False Claims Act of 1863 to read:

National Recovery Administration

The '''National Recovery Administration''' ('''NRA''') was the primary New Deal agency established by U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) in 1933. The goal was to eliminate "cut-throat competition" by bringing industry, labor and government together to create codes of "fair practices" and set prices. The NRA was created by the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA) and allowed industries to get together and write "codes of fair competition." The codes were intended to reduce "destructive competition" and to help workers by setting minimum wages and maximum weekly hours, as well as minimum prices at which products could be sold. The NRA also had a two-year renewal charter and was set to expire in June 1935 if not renewed. http: www.novelguide.com a discover egd_02 egd_02_00388.html

In 1935, the U.S. Supreme Court (Supreme Court of the United States) unanimously declared that the NRA law was unconstitutional, ruling that it infringed the separation of powers under the United States Constitution. The NRA quickly stopped operations, but many of its labor provisions reappeared in the National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act), passed later the same year. The long-term result was a surge in the growth and power of unions (Trade union), which became a core of the New Deal Coalition that dominated national politics for the next three decades.

The NRA, symbolized by the Blue Eagle, was popular with workers. Businesses that supported the NRA put the symbol in their shop windows and on their packages, though they did not always go along with the regulations entailed. Though membership to the NRA was voluntary, businesses that did not display the eagle were very often boycotted, making it seem mandatory for survival to many.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017