Namibia

What is Namibia known for?


people+number

and Steve Reich, performed by Pierre-Laurent Aimard. Teldec Classics: 8573 86584-2. Liner notes by Aimard, Ligeti, Reich, and Simha Arom and Stefan Schomann. Music permeates daily life and there are songs for entertainment as well as specific events and activities. * The Ovambo people number roughly 1,500,000 and consist of a number of kindred groups that inhabit Ovamboland in northern Namibia, forming about half of that state's population, as well

people ''oviritje'', also known as ''konsert'', has become popular in Namibia. The Damara (Damara (people)) are genetically Bantu but speak the "click" language of the bushmen. Ma gaisa or Damara Punch is a popular dance music genre that derives from their traditional music. * The Ovambo people number roughly 1,500,000 and consist of a number of kindred groups that inhabit Ovamboland in northern Namibia, forming about half of that state's population, as well


focus+speed

German unit of F.W. Woolworths, but has operated independently since 1998 as a result of the original company's change of focus. Speed records French (France) kitesurfer Sebastien Cattelan became the first sailor to break the 50 knots barrier by reaching 50.26 knots on 3 October 2008 at the Lüderitz Speed Challenge in Namibia. On 4 October, Alex Caizergues (also of France) broke this record with a 50.57 knots run. These speeds are verified, but are still subject


international species

remain in the wild, and based on International Species Information System records, more than 450 are kept in zoos. * ''G. c. angolensis (Namibian giraffe)'', the Angolan or Namibian giraffe has large spots with some notches around the edges, extending down


power opposition

for Democracy in Namibia and Executive Director of the Goldwater Institute before entering the House of Representatives. * Indonesia Democratic People's Party (Indonesia) (Partai Rakyat Demokratik) * Namibia - Democratic People's Party (Democratic People's Party (Namibia)) * Nigeria - Democratic People's Party (Democratic People's Party (Nigeria)) Namibia is a one party dominant state with the South-West Africa People's Organisation in power. Opposition parties are allowed, but are widely considered to have no real chance of gaining power. In Namibian politics, ethnicity plays a significant role in party (political party) affiliation and voting behaviour. Some parties are dominated by single ethnic groups; for example, the Seoposengwe (Seoposengwe Party) and Ipelegeng (Ipelegeng Democratic Party) parties were dominated by Tswana (Tswana people). shieldnose cobras South Africa (Cape Province, Transvaal (Transvaal Province)), Namibia, southern Angola, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique - '''Black Africa''' is a Namibian football (Association football) team from Katutura, Windhoek that plays in the Namibia Premier League. The car's safety levels were first proved when during a testing in Namibia in April 1993, a test driver wearing just shorts and t-shirt hit a rock and rolled the first prototype car several times. The driver managed to escape unscathed. Later in the year, the second prototype (XP2) was especially built for crashtesting (crash test) and passed with the front wheel arch untouched. Prototypes Prior to the sale of the first McLaren F1s, five prototypes were built, carrying the numbers XP1 through XP5. These cars carried minor subtle differences between each other as well as between the production road cars. XP1 was the first publicly unveiled car, and later destroyed in the accident in Namibia. XP2 was used for crash testing and also destroyed. Neither was ever painted. XP3 did durability testing, XP4 stress tested the gearbox system and XP5 was a publicity car, all owned by McLaren; they were also used for publicity shots and tested by reporters. All were painted a different colour, and each was able to be distinguished by its chassis code painted on the side rocker panel. XP4 was seen by many viewers of ''Top Gear (Top Gear (1977 TV series))'' when reviewed by Tiff Needell in the mid-1990s, while XP5 went on to be used in McLaren's famous top speed run. Opposition to South Africa's involvement in World War I With the outbreak of the First World War, a crisis ensued when Louis Botha agreed to send troops to take over the German colony of South West Africa (now Namibia). Many Boers were opposed to fighting for Britain and against Germany. Also, many were of German descent and Germany had been sympathetic to their struggle so they looked to De la Rey for leadership. In Parliament he advocated neutrality and stated that he was utterly opposed to war unless South Africa was attacked. Nevertheless he was persuaded by Botha and Jan Smuts not to take any actions which might arouse the Boers. De la Rey appears to have been torn between loyalty to his comrades-in-arms, most of whom had joined the Hertzog faction, and his sense of honour. World archaeology In 1972, Ucko accepted the post of Principal of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies in Canberra, where he countered then-racist (racism) trends by appointing Australian Aborigines to the council. Shennan, Stephen. Obituary in ''The Guardian'', July 9, 2007. In 1980 he advised the Zimbabwaean (Zimbabwe) government on cultural resource management (Cultural resources management) and in 1981 was appointed to succeed Colin Renfrew as professor of archaeology at the University of Southampton. At Southampton, Ucko agreed to become National Secretary of the British Congress of the International Union of Pre- and Protohistoric Sciences which was to hold its next four-yearly meeting in England in 1986. At Ucko's urging, the Executive Board decided to follow the policy agreed by UNESCO and exclude South African and Namibian delegates because of the Apartheid regime in those countries. The archaeological community was split, leading to the foundation of the World Archaeological Congress. He wrote about the moral issues involved in his most personal work, ''Academic Freedom and Apartheid''. Prevalence Geodes are common in some formations in the United States (mainly in Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Kentucky, and Utah). They also are common in Brazil, Namibia, and Mexico. A large geode was discovered in Put-in-Bay, Ohio in the early 20th century. It is known as Crystal Cave (Crystal Cave (Ohio)), and tours are possible during the summer. In 1967, Iowa designated the geode as the official state rock, and it has a Geode State Park. *Libya – Great Sand Sea - Hundreds of square miles of petrified trunks, branches and other debris mixed with Stone Age artifacts. *Namibia – Petrified forest of Damaraland *New Zealand: In 1959, Lowenstein made a clandestine tour of South-West Africa, now Namibia. While he was there, he collected testimony against the South African controlled government (South-West Africa was a United Nations Trust Territory). After his return, he spent a year promoting his findings to various student organizations, then wrote a book, ''A Brutal Mandate'', with an introduction by Eleanor Roosevelt, with whom he had worked in 1957 at the American Association for the United Nations. The Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa (CCETSA) is a charity (Charitable organization) founded in 1981. It was set up as the Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa and Collins was its first chairman. In the days of apartheid it provided money to help South African and Namibian refugee students gain the higher education in the United Kingdom and in independent African states. It now provides scholarships for students within South Africa and in other African countries. Because "over 50% of prescription drugs are derived from chemicals first identified in plants," BBC NEWS, Medical plants 'face extinction' a 2008 report from the Botanic Gardens Conservation International (representing botanic gardens in 120 countries) warned that "cures for things such as cancer and HIV may become 'extinct before they are ever found'." They identified 400 medicinal plants at risk of extinction from over-collection and deforestation, threatening the discovery of future cures for disease. These included Yew tree (taxus brevifolia)s (the bark is used for the cancer drug paclitaxel); Hoodia (from Namibia, a potential source of weight loss drugs); half of Magnolias (used as Chinese medicine for 5,000 years to fight cancer, dementia and heart disease); and Autumn crocus (for gout). Their report said that "five billion people still rely on traditional plant-based medicine as their primary form of health care." Daimler-Benz also has a history in four-wheel drive. In 1907 the Daimler Motoren Gesellschaft had built a four-wheel-driven vehicle called ''Dernburg-Wagen'', also equipped with four-wheel steering, that was used by German colonial civil servant, Bernhard Dernburg, in Namibia. Mercedes and BMW, in 1926, introduced a rather sophisticated four-wheel drive, the G1, the G4 and G4 following. The 1937 Mercedes-Benz G5 and BMW 325 4×4 featured full-time four-wheel drive, four-wheel steering, three locking differentials, and fully independent suspension. They were produced because of a government demand for a four-wheel-drive passenger vehicle. The modern G-series Wolf such as the G500 (G-Class) and G55 (G-Class#Models) AMG (Mercedes-AMG) still feature some of the attributes, with the exception of fully independent suspension since it hinders suspension articulation. The Unimog is another Mercedes truck. The '''Northern Cape''' (Afrikaans: ''Noord-Kaap'') is the largest and most sparsely populated province (Provinces of South Africa) of South Africa. It was created in 1994 when the Cape Province was split up. Its capital is Kimberley (Kimberley, South Africa). It includes the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park (Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park), part of an international park shared with Botswana. It also includes the Augrabies Falls and the diamond mining regions in Kimberley and Alexander Bay (Alexander Bay, Northern Cape). The Namaqualand region in the west is famous for its Namaqualand daisies. The southern towns of De Aar and Colesberg, in the Great Karoo, are major transport nodes between Johannesburg, Cape Town and Port Elizabeth. In the northeast, Kuruman is famous as a mission (Mission (station)) station and also for its 'eye'. The Orange River flows through the province, forming the borders with the Free State (Free State (South African province)) in the southeast and with Namibia to the northwest. The river is also used to irrigate the many vineyards in the arid region near Upington. The Northern Cape is also the home of over 1,000 San (Bushmen) who immigrated from Namibia following the independence of the country; they had served as trackers and scouts for the South African government during the war (Namibian War of Independence), and feared reprisals from their former foes. They were awarded a settlement in Platfontein in 1999 by the Mandela government. **Kionga Triangle - since 1920 (earlier occupied) in Portuguese Mozambique *German South West Africa (''Deutsch-Südwestafrika'') - present-day Namibia (except then-British Walvis Bay) and part of Botswana (Südrand des Caprivi-Zipfels (Caprivi Strip)) *German West Africa (Deutsch-Westafrika) - existed as one unit only for two or three years, then split into two colonies due to distances: The '''Karas Region''' is the southernmost region (Regions of Namibia) of Namibia. The name assigned to the region reflects the prominence of the Karas mountain range (Great Karas Mountains) in its southern part. The Karas region is considered as a natural organic administrative and economic unit and includes the magisterial districts of Keetmanshoop, Karasburg, Bethanie (Bethanie, Namibia) and Lüderitz. A further characteristic of the Region is the harbour town of Lüderitz and its fishing and boat building industry, the diamond areas along the coast, both on and off shore, with Oranjemund as the main centre, mining enterprises in the southern part of Namibia (Klein Karas area, Rosh Pinah), the Kudu Gas field in the Atlantic Ocean near Lüderitz and small-scale industries in Lüderitz and Keetmanshoop. '''Khomas''' is one of the thirteen regions (regions of Namibia) of Namibia. It contains the capital city Windhoek and provides for this reason superior transportation infrastructure. It has well-developed economical, financial, and trade sectors. Khomas Region occupies 4.5% of the land area of Namibia


amp run

to ratification by the World Sailing Speed Record Council. http: www.sail-world.com Australia Fifty-knots-broken-again---New-Speed-Record 49448 Earlier in the event, on 19 September, American (United States) Robert Douglas (Robert Douglas (kitesurfer)) reached 49.84 knots (92.30 km h), http: www.luderitz-speed.com ContentPages Results Results.aspx?Filter Overall&Session 3&Run 9 19 2008 becoming the first kitesurfer to establish

an outright world record in speed sailing. Previously the record was held only by sailboats or windsurfers. Douglas also became the world's third over-50 knots sailor, when on 8 September he made a 50.54 knots (93.60 km h) run. http: www.luderitz-speed.com ContentPages Results Results.aspx?Filter Overall&Session 11&Run 10 8 2008 Cryolite has also been reported at Pikes Peak, Colorado; Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec; and at Miass, Russia

in Namibia. On October 4, 2008 frenchman Alex Caizergues, also using a kite, broke this record with a 50.57 knots run. http: www.sail-world.com Australia Fifty-knots-broken-again---New-Speed-Record 49448 Earlier in the event, on September 19, kitesurfer Robert Douglas (USA) made a 49.84 knots (92.30 km h) run, http: www.luderitz-speed.com ContentPages Results Results.aspx?Filter Overall&Session 3&Run 9 19 2008 becoming the first


title+vast

conservancies . These conservancies are particularly important to the rural, generally unemployed, population. An aquifer called "Ohangwena II" has been discovered, capable of supplying the 800,000 people in the North for 400 years. ref>


award special


cultural analysis

development'', Christian Welzel, Ronald Inglehart & Hans-Dieter Klingemann (2003). "The Theory of Human Development: A Cross-Cultural Analysis." ''European Journal of Political Research'' 42:341-379 which empowers ordinary people in a three-step sequence. First, modernization gives more resources into the hands of people, which empowers capability-wise, enabling people to practice freedom. This tends to give rise to ''emancipative values'' that emphasize freedom


speed run

'' when reviewed by Tiff Needell in the mid-1990s, while XP5 went on to be used in McLaren's famous top speed run. Opposition to South Africa's involvement in World War I With the outbreak of the First World War, a crisis ensued when Louis Botha agreed to send troops to take over the German colony of South West Africa (now Namibia). Many Boers were opposed to fighting for Britain and against Germany. Also, many were of German descent and Germany had been sympathetic to their struggle so they looked to De la Rey for leadership. In Parliament he advocated neutrality and stated that he was utterly opposed to war unless South Africa was attacked. Nevertheless he was persuaded by Botha and Jan Smuts not to take any actions which might arouse the Boers. De la Rey appears to have been torn between loyalty to his comrades-in-arms, most of whom had joined the Hertzog faction, and his sense of honour. World archaeology In 1972, Ucko accepted the post of Principal of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies in Canberra, where he countered then-racist (racism) trends by appointing Australian Aborigines to the council. Shennan, Stephen. Obituary in ''The Guardian'', July 9, 2007. In 1980 he advised the Zimbabwaean (Zimbabwe) government on cultural resource management (Cultural resources management) and in 1981 was appointed to succeed Colin Renfrew as professor of archaeology at the University of Southampton. At Southampton, Ucko agreed to become National Secretary of the British Congress of the International Union of Pre- and Protohistoric Sciences which was to hold its next four-yearly meeting in England in 1986. At Ucko's urging, the Executive Board decided to follow the policy agreed by UNESCO and exclude South African and Namibian delegates because of the Apartheid regime in those countries. The archaeological community was split, leading to the foundation of the World Archaeological Congress. He wrote about the moral issues involved in his most personal work, ''Academic Freedom and Apartheid''. Prevalence Geodes are common in some formations in the United States (mainly in Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, Kentucky, and Utah). They also are common in Brazil, Namibia, and Mexico. A large geode was discovered in Put-in-Bay, Ohio in the early 20th century. It is known as Crystal Cave (Crystal Cave (Ohio)), and tours are possible during the summer. In 1967, Iowa designated the geode as the official state rock, and it has a Geode State Park. *Libya – Great Sand Sea - Hundreds of square miles of petrified trunks, branches and other debris mixed with Stone Age artifacts. *Namibia – Petrified forest of Damaraland *New Zealand: In 1959, Lowenstein made a clandestine tour of South-West Africa, now Namibia. While he was there, he collected testimony against the South African controlled government (South-West Africa was a United Nations Trust Territory). After his return, he spent a year promoting his findings to various student organizations, then wrote a book, ''A Brutal Mandate'', with an introduction by Eleanor Roosevelt, with whom he had worked in 1957 at the American Association for the United Nations. The Canon Collins Educational Trust for Southern Africa (CCETSA) is a charity (Charitable organization) founded in 1981. It was set up as the Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa and Collins was its first chairman. In the days of apartheid it provided money to help South African and Namibian refugee students gain the higher education in the United Kingdom and in independent African states. It now provides scholarships for students within South Africa and in other African countries. Because "over 50% of prescription drugs are derived from chemicals first identified in plants," BBC NEWS, Medical plants 'face extinction' a 2008 report from the Botanic Gardens Conservation International (representing botanic gardens in 120 countries) warned that "cures for things such as cancer and HIV may become 'extinct before they are ever found'." They identified 400 medicinal plants at risk of extinction from over-collection and deforestation, threatening the discovery of future cures for disease. These included Yew tree (taxus brevifolia)s (the bark is used for the cancer drug paclitaxel); Hoodia (from Namibia, a potential source of weight loss drugs); half of Magnolias (used as Chinese medicine for 5,000 years to fight cancer, dementia and heart disease); and Autumn crocus (for gout). Their report said that "five billion people still rely on traditional plant-based medicine as their primary form of health care." Daimler-Benz also has a history in four-wheel drive. In 1907 the Daimler Motoren Gesellschaft had built a four-wheel-driven vehicle called ''Dernburg-Wagen'', also equipped with four-wheel steering, that was used by German colonial civil servant, Bernhard Dernburg, in Namibia. Mercedes and BMW, in 1926, introduced a rather sophisticated four-wheel drive, the G1, the G4 and G4 following. The 1937 Mercedes-Benz G5 and BMW 325 4×4 featured full-time four-wheel drive, four-wheel steering, three locking differentials, and fully independent suspension. They were produced because of a government demand for a four-wheel-drive passenger vehicle. The modern G-series Wolf such as the G500 (G-Class) and G55 (G-Class#Models) AMG (Mercedes-AMG) still feature some of the attributes, with the exception of fully independent suspension since it hinders suspension articulation. The Unimog is another Mercedes truck. The '''Northern Cape''' (Afrikaans: ''Noord-Kaap'') is the largest and most sparsely populated province (Provinces of South Africa) of South Africa. It was created in 1994 when the Cape Province was split up. Its capital is Kimberley (Kimberley, South Africa). It includes the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park (Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park), part of an international park shared with Botswana. It also includes the Augrabies Falls and the diamond mining regions in Kimberley and Alexander Bay (Alexander Bay, Northern Cape). The Namaqualand region in the west is famous for its Namaqualand daisies. The southern towns of De Aar and Colesberg, in the Great Karoo, are major transport nodes between Johannesburg, Cape Town and Port Elizabeth. In the northeast, Kuruman is famous as a mission (Mission (station)) station and also for its 'eye'. The Orange River flows through the province, forming the borders with the Free State (Free State (South African province)) in the southeast and with Namibia to the northwest. The river is also used to irrigate the many vineyards in the arid region near Upington. The Northern Cape is also the home of over 1,000 San (Bushmen) who immigrated from Namibia following the independence of the country; they had served as trackers and scouts for the South African government during the war (Namibian War of Independence), and feared reprisals from their former foes. They were awarded a settlement in Platfontein in 1999 by the Mandela government. **Kionga Triangle - since 1920 (earlier occupied) in Portuguese Mozambique *German South West Africa (''Deutsch-Südwestafrika'') - present-day Namibia (except then-British Walvis Bay) and part of Botswana (Südrand des Caprivi-Zipfels (Caprivi Strip)) *German West Africa (Deutsch-Westafrika) - existed as one unit only for two or three years, then split into two colonies due to distances: The '''Karas Region''' is the southernmost region (Regions of Namibia) of Namibia. The name assigned to the region reflects the prominence of the Karas mountain range (Great Karas Mountains) in its southern part. The Karas region is considered as a natural organic administrative and economic unit and includes the magisterial districts of Keetmanshoop, Karasburg, Bethanie (Bethanie, Namibia) and Lüderitz. A further characteristic of the Region is the harbour town of Lüderitz and its fishing and boat building industry, the diamond areas along the coast, both on and off shore, with Oranjemund as the main centre, mining enterprises in the southern part of Namibia (Klein Karas area, Rosh Pinah), the Kudu Gas field in the Atlantic Ocean near Lüderitz and small-scale industries in Lüderitz and Keetmanshoop. '''Khomas''' is one of the thirteen regions (regions of Namibia) of Namibia. It contains the capital city Windhoek and provides for this reason superior transportation infrastructure. It has well-developed economical, financial, and trade sectors. Khomas Region occupies 4.5% of the land area of Namibia


comic publication

; Brazil, Canada, China, Korea and Spain. This innovative approach to comic publication has seen the brand grow dramatically over the last few years, with Supa Strikas now reaching an estimated ten million readers a week worldwide. Today, the comic is available across Africa (Botswana, Cameroon, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, Namibia, Nigeria, Réunion, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia); in Latin

Namibia

'''Namibia''' ), and formerly South West Africa, is a country in southern Africa whose western border is the Atlantic Ocean. It shares land borders with Zambia and Angola to the north, Botswana to the east and South Africa to the south and east. Although it does not border Zimbabwe, less than 200 metres of riverbed (essentially the Zambia Botswana border) separates them at their closest points. It gained independence from South Africa on 21 March 1990, following the Namibian War of Independence. Its capital and largest city is Windhoek. Namibia is a member state of the United Nations (UN), the Southern African Development Community (SADC), the African Union (AU), and the Commonwealth of Nations.

The dry lands of Namibia were inhabited since early times by San (San people), Damara (Damara (people)), and Namaqua (Nama people), and since about the 14th century AD by immigrating Bantu (Bantu peoples) who came with the Bantu expansion. Most of the territory became a German Imperial (German Empire) protectorate in 1884 and remained a German colony until the end of World War I. In 1920, the League of Nations mandated the country to South Africa, which imposed its laws and, from 1948, its apartheid (South Africa under apartheid) policy. The port of Walvis Bay and the offshore Penguin Islands had been annexed by the Cape Colony (British Cape Colony) under the British crown by 1878 and had become an integral part of the new Union of South Africa at its creation in 1910.

Uprisings and demands by African leaders led the UN to assume direct responsibility over the territory. It recognised the South West Africa People's Organisation (SWAPO) (SWAPO) as the official representative of the Namibian people in 1973. Namibia, however, remained under South African administration during this time as South-West Africa. Following internal violence, South Africa installed an interim administration in Namibia in 1985. Namibia obtained full independence from South Africa in 1990, with the exception of Walvis Bay and the Penguin Islands, which remained under South African control until 1994.

Namibia has a population of 2.1 million people and a stable multi-party (Multi-party system) parliamentary democracy. Agriculture, herding, tourism (Tourism in Namibia) and the mining industry (Mineral industry of Namibia) – including mining for gem diamonds, uranium (Uranium mining), gold (Gold mining), silver (Silver mining), and base metals – form the basis of Namibia's economy (Economy of Namibia). Given the presence of the arid Namib Desert, it is one of the least densely populated (List of sovereign states and dependent territories by population density) countries in the world. Namibia enjoys high political, economic and social stability.

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