Najran

What is Najran known for?


quot commentary

;: جواد علي, المفصل في تاريخ العرب قبل الإسلام (Jawad Ali, ''Al-Mufassal fi Tarikh Al-‘Arab Qabl Al-Islam''; "Commentary on the History of the Arabs Before Islam"), Baghdad, 1955–1983 Considered as a whole, these provinces present the Empire's broadest and most complex syntheses of imperial and native cult, funded through private and public initiatives and ranging from the god-like honours due a living patron to what Harland (2003) interprets as privately funded communal mystery rites. Harland, 2003, 91–103, finds among these examples a privately funded local, traditional Graeco-Asian civil association offering cult to Demeter and the Emperor as a form of mystery cult: ''contra'' Price, 1986, 7–11, who believes that Emperors lacked the requisite fully divine status. See also Harland, 1996. The Greek cities of Roman Asia (Asia (Roman province)) competed for the privilege of building high-status Imperial cult centres (neocorates). Ephesus and Sardis, ancient rivals, had two apiece until the early 3rd century AD, when Ephesus was allowed an additional temple, to the reigning emperor Caracalla. When he died, the city lost its brief, celebrated advantage through a religious technicality. Llewelyn, S.R. (Editor), ''New documents illustrating early Christianity: Volume 9, A Review of the Greek Inscriptions and Papyri Published in 1986–87,'' Macquarie University, 2002, pp.28 - 30. to hadith collections, in 631 an Arab Christian (Arab Christians) envoy from Najran (currently in northern Yemen and partly in Saudi Arabia) came to Muhammad to argue which of the two parties erred in its doctrine concerning Jesus. After likening Jesus' miraculous birth to Adam's creation


religious

. The population mostly originates from the ancient tribe of Yām (Banu Yam). Due to its long history, the inhabitants of Najran are made up of many ethnic groups, religions and backgrounds. Islam is the religion of all of the Najranis, with Shia (Shia Islam) Ismaili (Ismailism) forming the plurality of the religious adherents. Hanbali, Shafi'i and Maliki Sunnis (Sunni Islam) form the second largest ethno-religious group in the city, while the Zaydi Shia form the smallest

ethno-religious group. The Arabic term '' '' has at least two meanings. It means both the wooden frame on which a door opens and also 'thirsty'. Local tradition also has it that the land derived its name from the first man to settle in the area, Najran ibn Zaydan ibn Saba ibn Yahjub ibn Yarub ibn Qahtan. Najran was the Yemeni centre of cloth making and originally, the ''kiswah'' or the cloth of the Ka'aba was made there (the clothing of the Kaba first started

to be respected by both sides. Protests The Ismailis (Ismailism), a religious and ethnic minority with historic roots in Najrān Province (Najran Province) of southwestern Saudi Arabia, face increasing threats to their identity as a result of official discrimination. With the arrival of Mishʻal bin Suʻūd (Mishaal bin Saud) as the governor of Najrān in 1996, tension between local authorities and the Ismaili population increased, culminating in a confrontation between armed Ismāʻīlī


sports local

private schools in Najran. Colleges and universities Najran is home of Najran University, Najran College of Technology. Sports Local Football Clubs * Al-Okdod Club (Arabic: نادي الأخدود) founded in 1975 * Sharora Club (Arabic: نادي شرورة) founded in 1975 * Najran Club (Najran SC) (Arabic: نادي نجران) founded in 1980 Sports Centers There are many sports centers and complexes within the city including: * Khldiat Al-Janob Sport Center (Arabic: مركز الخالدية الرياضي


cursing

and partly in Saudi Arabia) came to Muhammad to argue which of the two parties erred in its doctrine concerning Jesus. After likening Jesus' miraculous birth to Adam's creation Muhammad, to prove to them that he is a prophet, brought his daughter Fatimah and his


involvement

Arabia all reflect a new zenith in Aksumite power. His involvement would mark the beginning of centuries of Aksumite involvement in South Arabia, culminating with the full-scale invasion of Yemen by King Kaleb (Kaleb of Axum) in 520 (or 525), resulting in the establishment of an Aksumite (Kingdom of Aksum) province covering all of South Arabia. In the year 630, when


main history

;ref Hitti, Phillip. History of the Arabs from the Earliest time to the Present. New York: Macmillan, 1951. p. 61 The town of Najrān was already an important centre of arms manufacture during the lifetime of Muhammad. However, it was more famous for leather rather than iron. Former Jewish community


unique buildings

by a circular wall, 220 by 230 meters, built of square stone with defensive balconies. It contained several unique buildings. There is also a cemetery south of the external wall. Excavations of this site have uncovered glass, metals, pottery, and bronze artifacts. Square and rectangular buildings have also been found. At Al-Ukhdūd which is south of Najrān city, carvings from those days and human bones can be seen. A museum displays, among other items, a bronze lion head. Najrān's landmarks include the "Rass" stone, a 2-meter-high granite stone. The Incense Road: Najran Geography Topography Najran enjoys three different geographic landscapes, and they are: the oases, mountains, and desert at its eastside. Climate The average temperature in Najran ranges from 14.6 to 30.9. The average annual rainfall is 83 mm. Education Schools and libraries There are 560 public schools, and 10 private schools in Najran. Colleges and universities Najran is home of Najran University, Najran College of Technology. Sports Local Football Clubs * Al-Okdod Club (Arabic: نادي الأخدود) founded in 1975 * Sharora Club (Arabic: نادي شرورة) founded in 1975 * Najran Club (Najran SC) (Arabic: نادي نجران) founded in 1980 Sports Centers There are many sports centers and complexes within the city including: * Khldiat Al-Janob Sport Center (Arabic: مركز الخالدية الرياضي ) * Prince Mishal Sport Center (Arabic: مركز الأمير مشعل ) * Najran Bowling Alley * Hospitals and Medical Care * King Khalid Hospital * Najran General Hospital * Maternity & Children's Hospital Najran * Najran Armed Forces Hospital * General Psychiatric Hospital * Al Zafer Hospital * Al Hayah Hospital Hotels * Happy Day Inn * Hyatt Najran * Holiday Inn * Najran Crown * Najran Hotel * Ramada Hotel Sports File:Najshiarjadid.png Najran SC References


part amp

bethlehem beth-hlccni.htm Bethlehem, The Holy Land’s Collective Cultural National Identity: A Palestinian Arab Historical Perspective Musallam, Adnan. Bethlehem University. thumb left upright Four Bethlehem Christian women, 1911 (File:Bethlehem4.jpg) The Axumite Kingdom is recorded once again as controlling part – if not all – of Yemen in the 6th century. Around 523, the Jewish king Dhu Nuwas came to power in Yemen and, announcing that he would kill all the Christians, attacked an Aksumite garrison at Zafar (Zafar, Yemen), burning the city's churches. He then attacked the Christian stronghold of Najran, slaughtering the Christians who would not convert. Emperor Justin I of the Eastern Roman empire requested that his fellow Christian, Kaleb (Kaleb of Axum), help fight the Yemenite king, and around 525, Kaleb invaded and defeated Dhu Nuwas, appointing his Christian follower Sumuafa' Ashawa' as his viceroy. This dating is tentative, however, as the basis of the year 525 for the invasion is based on the death of the ruler of Yemen at the time, who very well could have been Kaleb's viceroy. Procopius records that after about five years, Abraha deposed the viceroy and made himself king (''Histories'' 1.20). Despite several attempted invasions across the Red Sea, Kaleb was unable to dislodge Abreha, and acquiesced in the change; this was the last time Ethiopian armies left Africa until the 20th century when several units participated in the Korean War. Eventually Kaleb abdicated in favor of his son Wa'zeb (W`ZB) and retired to a monastery, where he ended his days. Abraha later made peace with Kaleb's successor and recognized his suzerainty. Despite this reverse, under Ezana and Kaleb the kingdom was at its height, benefiting from a large trade, which extended as far as India and Ceylon, and were in constant communication with the Byzantine Empire. Umar is regarded as one of the greatest political geniuses in history. While under his leadership, the empire was expanding at a unprecedented rate, he also began to build the political structure that would hold together the vast empire that was being built. He undertook many administrative reforms and closely oversaw public policy. He established an advanced administration for the newly conquered lands, including several new ministries and bureaucracies, and ordered a census of all the Muslim territories. During his rule, the garrison cities (amsar) of Basra and Kufa were founded or expanded. In 638, he extended and renovated the Masjid al-Haram (Grand Mosque) in Mecca and the Al-Masjid al-Nabawi (Mosque of the Prophet) in Medina. ''Book of the Thousand Nights and One Night'', E. P. Mathers, page no: 471 Umar also ordered the expulsion of the Christian and Jewish communities of Najran and Khaybar allowing them to reside in Syria or Iraq. He issued orders that these Christians and Jews should be treated well and allotted them the equivalent land in their new settlements. Umar also forbade non-Muslims to reside in the Hejaz for longer than three days. Giorgio Levi Della Vida and Michael Bonner, ''Encyclopaedia of Islam'', and Madelung, ''The Succession to Prophet Muhammad'', p. 74 He was first to establish the army as a state department. During Muhammad's Era ''Jizya'' was levied in the time of Muhammad on vassal tribes under Muslim control and protection, including Jews in Khaybar, Christians in Najran, and Zoroastrians in Bahrain. William Montgomery Watt traces its origin to a pre-Islamic practice among the Arabian nomads wherein a powerful tribe would agree to protect its weaker neighbors in exchange for a tribute, which would be refunded if the protection proved ineffectual. William Montgomery Watt (1980), pp. 49–50. - EAM OENG Najran Domestic Airport Najran (Nejran), Saudi Arabia - accessdate 2007-05-08 They live mostly in the eastern districts on the Persian Gulf (Qatif, Al-Hasa, Dammam), where they constitute approximately three-quarters of the native population, and in western highlands of Arabia (districts of Jazan, Najran, Asir, Medina, Ta'if, and Hijaz). Conversion by Muslims to another religion (apostasy) is punishable by death under the version of Islamic law adopted by the country, but,


illustrating

(neocorates). Ephesus and Sardis, ancient rivals, had two apiece until the early 3rd century AD, when Ephesus was allowed an additional temple, to the reigning emperor Caracalla. When he died, the city lost its brief, celebrated advantage through a religious technicality. Llewelyn, S.R. (Editor), ''New documents illustrating early Christianity: Volume 9, A Review of the Greek Inscriptions and Papyri Published in 1986–87,'' Macquarie University, 2002, pp.28 - 30. http


long line

; taxi or car hire are available. The city is a 15 km long line along the highway, so very little is walkable. The countryside around the city (e.g. the highway to Abha) has a large number of police checkpoints, to combat smuggling to from Yemen; police escorts for tourists are common, and not as much fun as they sound. See thumb Najran Fort (File:Najran Fort, Saudi Arabia.jpg) * Due to the proximity to the Yemeni border, there is a wide variety of traditional mud architecture to be seen. * The city itself has an interesting souq area, with a fort. Buy Eat Drink Sleep thumb A traditional house in Najran (File:Origineel huis Najran.JPG) * There is a Best Western, of all things. It provides adequate rooms. Go next * Although the city is the closest major Saudi city to the Yemen border, land travel across may not be possible, and is certainly not recommended due to the high level of violence in the area. WikiPedia:Najran Commons:Category:Najran Province

Najran

'''Najran''' ( ''), is a city in southwestern Saudi Arabia near the border with Yemen. It is the capital of Najran Province. Designated a new town, Najran is one of the fastest-growing cities in the kingdom; its population has risen from 47,500 in 1974 and 90,983 in 1992 to 246,880 in 2004. The population mostly originates from the ancient tribe of Yām (Banu Yam).

Due to its long history, the inhabitants of Najran are made up of many ethnic groups, religions and backgrounds. Islam is the religion of all of the Najranis, with Shia (Shia Islam) Ismaili (Ismailism) forming the plurality of the religious adherents. Hanbali, Shafi'i and Maliki Sunnis (Sunni Islam) form the second largest ethno-religious group in the city, while the Zaydi Shia form the smallest ethno-religious group.

The Arabic term '' '' has at least two meanings. It means both the wooden frame on which a door opens and also 'thirsty'. Local tradition also has it that the land derived its name from the first man to settle in the area, Najran ibn Zaydan ibn Saba ibn Yahjub ibn Yarub ibn Qahtan.

Najran was the Yemeni centre of cloth making and originally, the ''kiswah'' or the cloth of the Ka'aba was made there (the clothing of the Kaba first started by the Yemeni kings of Saba). There used to be a Jewish community at Najran, renowned for the garments they manufactured. According to Yemenite Jewish (Yemenite Jews) tradition, the Jews of Najran traced their origin to the Ten Tribes (Ten Lost Tribes). Najran was also an important stopping place on the Incense Route.

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