Mobile, Alabama

What is Mobile, Alabama known for?


making+training

Charlotte . The destroyer lay out of commission for eight years. Recommissioned on 26 April 1930, ''Wickes'' shifted to the Atlantic and was based at New York. She operated off the eastern seaboard, making training cruises with Naval Reserve (United States Navy Reserve) detachments from the 3d Naval District embarked. From 3 to 18 February 1931, the ship visited Tampa (Tampa, Florida), Florida, for the Florida State Fair and Gasparilla Pirate Festival, before she shifted to Mobile (Mobile, Alabama), Alabama, to take part in Mardi Gras observances. In November, the busy destroyer visited Bridgeport (Bridgeport, Connecticut) Connecticut, to participate in the Armistice Day observances on the 11th. In April 1932, two years after being recommissioned, ''Wickes'' reported for duty with Rotating Reserve Squadron 20 and subsequently shifted back to the Pacific. * 2004 Atlantic hurricane season: ** The eye of Hurricane Ivan makes landfall near Mobile (Mobile, Alabama), Alabama, in the early morning, killing at least 33 and causing an estimated USD Lt. Beedy said that if the fire had gotten worse than it was, there could have been injuries or deaths, saying "He endangered a lot of people." According to Lt. Beedy, building security cameras caught Shorrosh on camera entering and exiting the trash room of the building. Police Chief David Carpenter told WKRG (w:WKRG) ''News 5'', the CBS (w:CBS) affiliate in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), that Shorrosh used an accelerant (w:accelerant) to start the fire, in what police believe was an attempt to burn the building down. The Government Accountability Office (w:Government Accountability Office) on June 18 called for a re-run of the bidding for the U.S. Air Force $40 billion tanker contract (w:KC-X), citing major flaws in the procurement process. This imperils the Northrop Grumman (w:Northrop Grumman) and EADS North America (w:EADS North America) plan to assemble the planes in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), Alabama (w:Alabama).


title extremely

, damaged eastern sections of the city with extensive flooding in downtown, the Battleship Parkway, and the elevated Jubilee Parkway.


products quot

the woods of Alabama for commercial timbers and other valuable natural resources. The results of this work was publicized in 1879 under the title "The Forests of Alabama and Their Products". When John Forsyth Jr., editor-in-chief of the ''Mobile Register'' of Mobile, Alabama became minister to Mexico in 1856, O'Hara took his place in the newspaper. He continued to follow government orders, such as his diplomatic mission into the Tehuantepec grant debate


important+young

, then in 1941 formed his own orchestra, in which over the years he employed Charlie Parker, Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, Bud Powell, Eddie Vinson, and other important young players. DATE OF BIRTH July 10, 1911 PLACE OF BIRTH Mobile, Alabama, United States DATE OF DEATH September 15, 1985 An exit can be numbered by where the exit in the direction of increased mileage leaves the freeway, or by where the road that the exit serves crosses


studies+arts

Science, Criminal Justice, Informatics, Legal Studies, Arts, and Science. Spring Hill College, chartered in 1830, was the first Catholic college


programs work

and universities historically African American , community college (Community colleges in the United States). Bishop State has four campuses in Mobile and offers a wide array of associate degrees. Vocational Several post-secondary, vocational (Vocational education)-type


diverse+educational

United States , the Americas, Europe, and non-western art. The museum is host to exhibition programs which range from historical to contemporary, and features an array of diverse educational programs.


amp writing

early work from The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in 1936. Lt. Beedy said that if the fire had gotten worse than it was, there could have been injuries or deaths, saying "He endangered a lot of people." According to Lt. Beedy, building security cameras caught Shorrosh on camera entering and exiting the trash room of the building. Police Chief David Carpenter told WKRG (w:WKRG) ''News 5'', the CBS (w:CBS) affiliate in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), that Shorrosh used an accelerant (w:accelerant) to start the fire, in what police believe was an attempt to burn the building down. The Government Accountability Office (w:Government Accountability Office) on June 18 called for a re-run of the bidding for the U.S. Air Force $40 billion tanker contract (w:KC-X), citing major flaws in the procurement process. This imperils the Northrop Grumman (w:Northrop Grumman) and EADS North America (w:EADS North America) plan to assemble the planes in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), Alabama (w:Alabama).


called black

. The so-called ''Black Warrior'' Affair (Black Warrior Affair) was viewed by Congress as a violation of American rights; a hollow ultimatum issued by Soulé to the Spanish to return the ship only served to further strain relations, and he was barred from discussing Cuba's acquisition for nearly a year. Brown (1980), p. 124. While the matter was resolved peacefully, it fueled the flames of Southern expansionism. Schoultz (1998), pp. 50–53. *


time social

;progress1" During this time the city received $3 million in federal grants for harbor improvements to deepen the shipping channels in the harbor. During and after World War I, manufacturing became increasingly vital to Mobile's economic health, with shipbuilding and steel production being two of the most important. During this time, social justice and race relations in Mobile worsened, however. The state passed a new constitution in 1901 that disenfranchised most blacks and many poor whites (Disfranchisement after Reconstruction era); and the white-dominated legislature passed other discriminatory legislation. In 1902 the city government passed Mobile's first segregation (racial segregation) ordinance, one that segregated the city streetcars. It legislated what had been informal practice, enforced by convention. Mobile's African-American population responded to this with a two-month boycott, but the law was not repealed. After this, Mobile's ''de facto'' segregation was increasingly replaced with legislated segregation as whites imposed Jim Crow laws to maintain dominance. The red imported fire ant was first introduced into the United States via the Port of Mobile. Sometime in the late 1930s they came ashore off South American cargo ships. They were carried in the soil used as ballast on those ships. http: chppm-www.apgea.army.mil documents FACT RedImportedFireAntsJusttheFacts-Sep2007.pdf thumb A Liberty ship (File:Liberty ship at sea.jpg) of the type built at Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company during World War II. 20 were completed in Mobile. thumb The SS Hat Creek SS ''Hat Creek'' (File:US T2 WW2 tanker Hat Creek.JPG), a T2 tanker completed by Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company in 1943. The company built 102 of these oil tankers during the war. World War II led to a massive military effort causing a considerable increase in Mobile's population, largely due to the massive influx of workers coming to work in the shipyards and at the Brookley Army Air Field (Brookley Air Force Base). Thomason, Michael. ''Mobile : the new history of Alabama's first city'', pages 213–217. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8173-1065-7 Between 1940 and 1943, more than 89,000 people moved into Mobile to work for war effort industries. Mobile was one of eighteen United States cities producing Liberty ships. Its Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company (ADDSCO) supported the war effort by producing ships faster than the Axis powers (Axis powers of World War II) could sink them. ADDSCO also churned out a copious number of T2 tankers for the War Department. Gulf Shipbuilding Corporation, a subsidiary of Waterman Steamship Corporation, focused on building freighters (Cargo ship), Fletcher class destroyers, and minesweepers (Minesweeper (ship)). The years after World War II brought about changes in Mobile's social structure and economy. Replacing shipbuilding as a primary economic force, the paper and chemical industries began to expand. No longer needed for defense, most of the old military bases were converted to civilian uses. Following the war, in which many African Americans had served, they stepped up their activism to gain equal rights and social justice, especially in the South. The city of Mobile police force and Spring Hill College were integrated during the 1950s. Unlike the rest of the state, the city buses and lunch counters voluntarily desegregated by the early 1960s. The Alabama legislature passed the Cater Act in 1949 allowing cities and counties to set up industrial development boards (IDB) to issue municipal bonds as incentives to attract new industry into their local areas. The city of Mobile did not establish a Cater Act board until 1962. George E. McNally, Mobile's first Republican mayor since Reconstruction, was the driving force behind its creation. The Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce, believing its members were better qualified to attract new businesses and industry to the area, considered the the new IDB as a serious rival. After several years of political squabbling, the Chamber of Commerce emerged victorious. While McNally's IDB prompted the Chamber of Commerce to become more proactive in attracting new industry, the chamber effectively shut Mobile city government out of economic development decisions. Bill Patterson, "The Founding of the Industrial Development Board of the City of Mobile: The Port City's Reluctant Use of Subsidies", ''Gulf South Historical Review'' 2000 15(2): 21–40, In 1963 three African-American students brought a case against the Mobile County School Board for being denied admission to Murphy High School (Murphy High School (Alabama)). Thomason (2001), ''Mobile'', pp. 260–261 This was nearly a decade after the United States Supreme Court had ruled in ''Brown v. Board of Education'' (1954) that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional. The federal district court ordered that the three students be admitted to Murphy for the 1964 school year, leading to the desegregation of Mobile County's school system. The Civil Rights Movement gained passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965, eventually ending legal segregation and regaining effective suffrage for African Americans. Mobile's economy was dealt a severe blow in 1969 with the closing of Brookley Air Force Base. The closing left 10% of the city's workforce unemployed. This and other factors ushered in a period of economic depression that lasted through the 1970s. thumb left Downtown in 2008, as seen from Cooper Riverside Park. Buildings include (L to R): Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel, RSA–BankTrust Building (File:Downtown Mobile 2008 03.JPG), Arthur C. Outlaw Convention Center, and the RSA Battle House Tower. Beginning in the late 1980s, newly elected mayor Mike Dow and the city council began an effort termed the "String of Pearls Initiative" to make Mobile into a competitive city. Lt. Beedy said that if the fire had gotten worse than it was, there could have been injuries or deaths, saying "He endangered a lot of people." According to Lt. Beedy, building security cameras caught Shorrosh on camera entering and exiting the trash room of the building. Police Chief David Carpenter told WKRG (w:WKRG) ''News 5'', the CBS (w:CBS) affiliate in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), that Shorrosh used an accelerant (w:accelerant) to start the fire, in what police believe was an attempt to burn the building down. The Government Accountability Office (w:Government Accountability Office) on June 18 called for a re-run of the bidding for the U.S. Air Force $40 billion tanker contract (w:KC-X), citing major flaws in the procurement process. This imperils the Northrop Grumman (w:Northrop Grumman) and EADS North America (w:EADS North America) plan to assemble the planes in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), Alabama (w:Alabama).

Mobile, Alabama

'''Mobile''' ( making it the third most populous city in the State (U.S. state) of Alabama, the most populous in Mobile County, and the largest municipality on the Gulf Coast (Gulf Coast of the United States) between New Orleans, Louisiana (New Orleans), and St. Petersburg, Florida.

Alabama's only saltwater port, Mobile is located at the head of the Mobile Bay and the north-central Gulf Coast.

Mobile began as the first capital of colonial French Louisiana (Louisiana (New France)) in 1702. During its first 100 years, Mobile was a colony of France (Early Modern France), then Britain (Kingdom of Great Britain), and lastly Spain. Mobile first became a part of the United States of America in 1813, with the annexation of West Florida under President James Madison. In 1861 Alabama joined the Confederate States of America, which surrendered in 1865.

As one of the Gulf Coast (Gulf Coast of the United States)'s cultural centers, Mobile has several art museums, a symphony orchestra, a professional opera, a professional ballet company, and a large concentration of historic architecture. In 2005 the first integrated mystic society had a parade for Mardi Gras.

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