Mobile, Alabama

What is Mobile, Alabama known for?


independent rock

music country band, eventually leading the house band at Al Cottrill's club in Mobile (Mobile, Alabama). In 1959 he signed with Sandy Records. '''Sandy Records''' was a short-lived but very influential independent rock and roll (Image:Chocolatepapers.jpg) record label established in Mobile, Alabama by Paul DuBose


Faith Academy

web title Mobile's Private Schools work "Private Schools Report" url http: alabama.privateschoolsreport.com schools AL Mobile.html accessdate October 25, 2007 Notable private Protestant institutions include St. Paul's Episcopal School (1947), Mobile Christian School (1961), St. Lukes Episcopal School (1961), Cottage Hill Baptist School System (1961), Faith Academy (Faith Academy (Mobile, Alabama)) (1967), and Trinity Lutheran School (1955). UMS-Wright Preparatory School is an independent co-educational preparatory school (university-preparatory school). It assumed its current configuration in 1988, when the University Military School (founded 1893) and the Julius T. Wright School for Girls (1923) merged to form UMS-Wright. Lt. Beedy said that if the fire had gotten worse than it was, there could have been injuries or deaths, saying "He endangered a lot of people." According to Lt. Beedy, building security cameras caught Shorrosh on camera entering and exiting the trash room of the building. Police Chief David Carpenter told WKRG (w:WKRG) ''News 5'', the CBS (w:CBS) affiliate in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), that Shorrosh used an accelerant (w:accelerant) to start the fire, in what police believe was an attempt to burn the building down. The Government Accountability Office (w:Government Accountability Office) on June 18 called for a re-run of the bidding for the U.S. Air Force $40 billion tanker contract (w:KC-X), citing major flaws in the procurement process. This imperils the Northrop Grumman (w:Northrop Grumman) and EADS North America (w:EADS North America) plan to assemble the planes in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), Alabama (w:Alabama).


based record

the ''Fox 15 Breakfast Club'' TV show on WPMI-TV, the Gulf Coast Fox affiliate at that time before they switched with WALA-TV, which was then the NBC affiliate. He worked for the Mobile-based record company Integrity Music where he was the Radio Promotions Coordinator. Also, he served as Junior High Student Ministries Director for over 3 years at Knollwood Assembly of God in Mobile. He also worked freelance on various video and audio productions. In November 2006, WPRI renewed its


beauty culture

institutions have a campus in Mobile. These include the Alabama Institute Of Real Estate, American Academy Of Hypnosis, Bealle School Of Real Estate, Charles Academy Of Beauty Culture, Fortis College, Virginia College, ITT Technical Institute, Remington College and White And Sons Barber College. Healthcare thumb left Mobile Infirmary Medical Center in 2009. (File:Mobile Infirmary front facade.jpg) File:Providence Hospital Mobile 01.jpg thumb


online publication

In addition to offering several boat and adventure tours, it contains a small theater; exhibit hall; meeting facilities; walking trails; a canoe and kayak landing.<


single set

, it would also predict, for example, that a white person might have an average income $7,000 above a black person, and a 65-year-old might have an income $3,000 below a 45-year-old, in both cases regardless of location. A multilevel model, however, would allow for different regression coefficients for each predictor in each location. Essentially, it would assume that people in a given location have correlated incomes generated by a single set of regression coefficients, whereas people in another

location have incomes generated by a different set of coefficients. Meanwhile, the coefficients themselves are assumed to be correlated and generated from a single set of hyperparameters. Additional levels are possible: For example, people might be grouped by cities, and the city-level regression coefficients grouped by state, and the state-level coefficients generated from a single hyper-hyperparameter. On September 17, 2009 Carnival announced that the ''Fantasy'' would be based out


studies school

. It consists of the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Business, School of Christian Studies, School of Education, the School of Leadership Development, and the School of Nursing. Community college Bishop State Community College, founded in 1927, is a public, Historically black colleges


time social

;progress1" During this time the city received $3 million in federal grants for harbor improvements to deepen the shipping channels in the harbor. During and after World War I, manufacturing became increasingly vital to Mobile's economic health, with shipbuilding and steel production being two of the most important. During this time, social justice and race relations in Mobile worsened, however. The state passed a new constitution in 1901 that disenfranchised most blacks and many poor whites (Disfranchisement after Reconstruction era); and the white-dominated legislature passed other discriminatory legislation. In 1902 the city government passed Mobile's first segregation (racial segregation) ordinance, one that segregated the city streetcars. It legislated what had been informal practice, enforced by convention. Mobile's African-American population responded to this with a two-month boycott, but the law was not repealed. After this, Mobile's ''de facto'' segregation was increasingly replaced with legislated segregation as whites imposed Jim Crow laws to maintain dominance. The red imported fire ant was first introduced into the United States via the Port of Mobile. Sometime in the late 1930s they came ashore off South American cargo ships. They were carried in the soil used as ballast on those ships. http: chppm-www.apgea.army.mil documents FACT RedImportedFireAntsJusttheFacts-Sep2007.pdf thumb A Liberty ship (File:Liberty ship at sea.jpg) of the type built at Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company during World War II. 20 were completed in Mobile. thumb The SS Hat Creek SS ''Hat Creek'' (File:US T2 WW2 tanker Hat Creek.JPG), a T2 tanker completed by Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company in 1943. The company built 102 of these oil tankers during the war. World War II led to a massive military effort causing a considerable increase in Mobile's population, largely due to the massive influx of workers coming to work in the shipyards and at the Brookley Army Air Field (Brookley Air Force Base). Thomason, Michael. ''Mobile : the new history of Alabama's first city'', pages 213–217. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2001. ISBN 0-8173-1065-7 Between 1940 and 1943, more than 89,000 people moved into Mobile to work for war effort industries. Mobile was one of eighteen United States cities producing Liberty ships. Its Alabama Drydock and Shipbuilding Company (ADDSCO) supported the war effort by producing ships faster than the Axis powers (Axis powers of World War II) could sink them. ADDSCO also churned out a copious number of T2 tankers for the War Department. Gulf Shipbuilding Corporation, a subsidiary of Waterman Steamship Corporation, focused on building freighters (Cargo ship), Fletcher class destroyers, and minesweepers (Minesweeper (ship)). The years after World War II brought about changes in Mobile's social structure and economy. Replacing shipbuilding as a primary economic force, the paper and chemical industries began to expand. No longer needed for defense, most of the old military bases were converted to civilian uses. Following the war, in which many African Americans had served, they stepped up their activism to gain equal rights and social justice, especially in the South. The city of Mobile police force and Spring Hill College were integrated during the 1950s. Unlike the rest of the state, the city buses and lunch counters voluntarily desegregated by the early 1960s. The Alabama legislature passed the Cater Act in 1949 allowing cities and counties to set up industrial development boards (IDB) to issue municipal bonds as incentives to attract new industry into their local areas. The city of Mobile did not establish a Cater Act board until 1962. George E. McNally, Mobile's first Republican mayor since Reconstruction, was the driving force behind its creation. The Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce, believing its members were better qualified to attract new businesses and industry to the area, considered the the new IDB as a serious rival. After several years of political squabbling, the Chamber of Commerce emerged victorious. While McNally's IDB prompted the Chamber of Commerce to become more proactive in attracting new industry, the chamber effectively shut Mobile city government out of economic development decisions. Bill Patterson, "The Founding of the Industrial Development Board of the City of Mobile: The Port City's Reluctant Use of Subsidies", ''Gulf South Historical Review'' 2000 15(2): 21–40, In 1963 three African-American students brought a case against the Mobile County School Board for being denied admission to Murphy High School (Murphy High School (Alabama)). Thomason (2001), ''Mobile'', pp. 260–261 This was nearly a decade after the United States Supreme Court had ruled in ''Brown v. Board of Education'' (1954) that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional. The federal district court ordered that the three students be admitted to Murphy for the 1964 school year, leading to the desegregation of Mobile County's school system. The Civil Rights Movement gained passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965, eventually ending legal segregation and regaining effective suffrage for African Americans. Mobile's economy was dealt a severe blow in 1969 with the closing of Brookley Air Force Base. The closing left 10% of the city's workforce unemployed. This and other factors ushered in a period of economic depression that lasted through the 1970s. thumb left Downtown in 2008, as seen from Cooper Riverside Park. Buildings include (L to R): Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel, RSA–BankTrust Building (File:Downtown Mobile 2008 03.JPG), Arthur C. Outlaw Convention Center, and the RSA Battle House Tower. Beginning in the late 1980s, newly elected mayor Mike Dow and the city council began an effort termed the "String of Pearls Initiative" to make Mobile into a competitive city. Lt. Beedy said that if the fire had gotten worse than it was, there could have been injuries or deaths, saying "He endangered a lot of people." According to Lt. Beedy, building security cameras caught Shorrosh on camera entering and exiting the trash room of the building. Police Chief David Carpenter told WKRG (w:WKRG) ''News 5'', the CBS (w:CBS) affiliate in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), that Shorrosh used an accelerant (w:accelerant) to start the fire, in what police believe was an attempt to burn the building down. The Government Accountability Office (w:Government Accountability Office) on June 18 called for a re-run of the bidding for the U.S. Air Force $40 billion tanker contract (w:KC-X), citing major flaws in the procurement process. This imperils the Northrop Grumman (w:Northrop Grumman) and EADS North America (w:EADS North America) plan to assemble the planes in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), Alabama (w:Alabama).


national events

, Alabama Mobile , Alabama DATE OF DEATH May 15, 2002 Although Phi Kappa had chartered nearly fifty chapters and had initiated more than 10,000 young men throughout the years, only ten of these chapters survived into the third millennium. Unfortunately, many of these chapters were severely weakened by a few high profile, yet isolated, instances of carelessness and ungentlemanlike conduct at national events. By 2005, the fraternity shrunk to encompass only a handful of chapters


contemporary works

exhibits include the African and Asian Collection Gallery, Altmayer Gallery (American art), Katharine C. Cochrane Gallery of American Fine Art, Maisel European Gallery, Riddick Glass Gallery, Smith Crafts Gallery, and the Ann B. Hearin Gallery (contemporary works). The Centre for the Living Arts

Mobile, Alabama

'''Mobile''' ( making it the third most populous city in the State (U.S. state) of Alabama, the most populous in Mobile County, and the largest municipality on the Gulf Coast (Gulf Coast of the United States) between New Orleans, Louisiana (New Orleans), and St. Petersburg, Florida.

Alabama's only saltwater port, Mobile is located at the head of the Mobile Bay and the north-central Gulf Coast.

Mobile began as the first capital of colonial French Louisiana (Louisiana (New France)) in 1702. During its first 100 years, Mobile was a colony of France (Early Modern France), then Britain (Kingdom of Great Britain), and lastly Spain. Mobile first became a part of the United States of America in 1813, with the annexation of West Florida under President James Madison. In 1861 Alabama joined the Confederate States of America, which surrendered in 1865.

As one of the Gulf Coast (Gulf Coast of the United States)'s cultural centers, Mobile has several art museums, a symphony orchestra, a professional opera, a professional ballet company, and a large concentration of historic architecture. In 2005 the first integrated mystic society had a parade for Mardi Gras.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017