Mission District, San Francisco

What is Mission District, San Francisco known for?


local film

Artists United site put together by Mission artists. The Roxie Theater, the oldest continuously operating movie theater in San Francisco, is host to repertory and independent films as well as local film festivals. Poets, musicians, emcees, and other artists sometimes gather on the southwest corner of the 16th and Mission intersection to perform.


style food

*San Francisco's Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco) is renowned for its densely-packed street art San Francisco Bay Guardian, Jan 18-24, 2012, p.22 along Mission Street, and all along both Clarion Alley and Balmy Alley. By 2010 street art was also being created in Hayes Valley (Hayes Valley, San Francisco), SoMa (South of Market, San Francisco), Bayview-Hunters Point (Bayview-Hunters Point, San Francisco) and the Tenderloin (Tenderloin, San Francisco). Chloe Veltman, "Street Art Moves Onto Some New Streets", ''New York Times, May 8, 2010 right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton.


paintings made

book author Latorre, Guisela title Walls of empowerment: Chicana o indigenist murals of California publisher University of Texas Press location Austin year 2008 isbn 0-292-71906-X pages 30–31 and inspired by the traditional Mexican paintings made famous by Diego Rivera. Some of the more significant mural installations are located on Balmy Alley and Clarion Alley. Music scene The Mission is rich in musical groups and performances. Mariachi bands play in restaurants throughout the district, especially in the restaurants congregated around Valencia and Mission in the northeast portion of the district. Carlos Santana spent his teenage years in the Mission, graduating from Mission High School (Mission High School (San Francisco, California)) in 1965. He has often returned to the neighborhood, including for a live concert with his band Santana (Santana (band)) that was recorded in 1969, CD Universe, ''Santana S.F. Mission District Live '69 CD''. Cduniverse.com (February 10, 2008). and for the KQED (KQED (TV)) documentary "The Mission" filmed in 1994. KQED, "The Mission". Kqed.org. The locally inspired song "Mission in the Rain" by Robert Hunter (Robert Hunter (lyricist)) and Jerry Garcia appeared on Garcia's solo album ''Reflections'' (Reflections (Jerry Garcia album)), and was played by the Grateful Dead five times in concert in 1976. David Dodd, ''The Annotated "Mission in the Rain"''. Arts.ucsc.edu. Classical music is heard in the concert hall of the Community Music Center on Capp Street. ''Community Music Center San Francisco: Mission District Branch''. Sfcmc.org. Elbo Room, a bar live music venue on Valencia Street, is home to Afrolicious, and Dub Mission, a weekly reggae dub (dub music) party started in 1996 by DJ Sep and over the years has brought many luminaries of reggae and dub music to perform there. The Mission District is also very popular for its influencing Hip-Hop Rap (Rapping) music scene. Record labels like Black N Brown Thizz Latin and Hometeam Ent. help put Mission District rappers, like Goldtoes, mousie, Gangsta Flea, The Goodfelonz, Mr. Kee, Friscasso, 10sion, and Don Louis & Colicious, get exposure through various compilations such as ''17 Reasons,'' ''18 Wit A Bullet,'' ''Organized Crime,'' ''Filthy Livin' In The Mission'', The Daily Grind's ''Fillmoe 2 Da Mission,'' and many others. There is a new generation of young and upcoming rappers who are emerging from this neighborhood such as G-One (R.I.P.), Los Da Rockstar, Gabz La Nueva Melodia, DJ Blaze, Loco C, Young Mix, Yung Dunn, and up-and-coming artist Skuchi to name a few. Other prominent musicians and musical personalities include alternative rock bands and musicians Luscious Jackson, Faith No More, The Looters (Mat Callahan#The Looters), Primus (Primus (band)), Chuck Prophet & The Mission Express (Chuck Prophet), Beck, Jawbreaker (Jawbreaker (band)). Salsa music performers Los Mocosos and Cesar Ascarrunz. Visual Arts Some well-known artists associated with the Mission District include * David Ireland (sculptor, installation artist, co-founder of Capp Street Project) * Ricardo Gouveia (a.k.a. "Rigo 23", painter, sculptor, and muralist) * Chris Johanson (painter and street artist) * Eth-Noh-Tec, Kinetic Story Theater Eth-Noh-Tec (storytelling kinetic theater) * Margaret Kilgallen (painter, printmaker, and graffiti artist) * Barry McGee (a.k.a. "Twist", painter and graffiti artist) * Ruby Neri (painter, sculptor, and graffiti artist) *Megan Wilson (conceptual, installation, and street artist) * Michael V. Rios ''The Art of Michael Rios''. Mvrios.com. (painter, designer, and muralist) * Xavier Viramontes Documentary, ''A Life in Print: Xavier Viramontes Printmaker''. Alifeinprint.net. (printmaker) * Scott Williams (Scott Williams (artist)) *San Francisco's Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco) is renowned for its densely-packed street art San Francisco Bay Guardian, Jan 18-24, 2012, p.22 along Mission Street, and all along both Clarion Alley and Balmy Alley. By 2010 street art was also being created in Hayes Valley (Hayes Valley, San Francisco), SoMa (South of Market, San Francisco), Bayview-Hunters Point (Bayview-Hunters Point, San Francisco) and the Tenderloin (Tenderloin, San Francisco). Chloe Veltman, "Street Art Moves Onto Some New Streets", ''New York Times, May 8, 2010 right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton.


wearing black

Francisco." The band practiced in Iyall's flat in Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco). It was decided that the group would embrace punk ideals despite the possibility that they become associated with the New Wave (New Wave music) movement. "Even though I was going to the Mabuhay Gardens so much, I also had criticisms: Everyone was leaning against the wall wearing black,"


major event

AFFORDABLE LOFT SPACE IS SCARCE date June 10, 2007 accessdate July 13, 2014 website SF Gate publisher Hearst Communications, Inc. last Weigert first Lili (painter, printmaker) * Benjamin Bratt (actor, producer) * Peter Bratt (film director, producer) Festivals, parades and fairs * '''Carnaval''' The major event of the year occurring each Memorial Day weekend is the Mission's Carnaval (Carnaval San Francisco) celebration. ''San Francisco Carnaval''. Carnaval.com. * '''24th Street Fair''' In March of each year a street fair is held along the 24th Street corridor. * '''San Francisco Food Fair''' Annually, for several years recently, food trucks and vendor booths have sold food to tens of thousands of people along Folsom Street adjacent to La Cochina on the third weekend in September. Mission Local. Mission Local (July 15, 2011). * '''Cesar Chavez Holiday Parade''' The second weekend of April is marked by a parade and celebration along 24th Street in honor of Cesar Chavez. Cesar E. Chavez Holiday Parade & Festival 2012. Cesarchavezday.org. * '''Transgender and Dyke Marches'''. On the Fridays and Saturdays of the fourth weekend of June there are major celebrations of the transgender and dyke communities located at Dolores Park, followed by a march in the evenings along 18th Streets and Valencia Streets. Transmarch.org. Transmarch.org. The Dyke March.org. The Dyke March.org. * '''Sunday Streets''' Twice each year, typically in May and October, Valencia, Harrison and 24th Streets are closed to automobile traffic and opened to pedestrians and bicyclists on Sunday as part of the Sunday Streets program. Sunday Streets SF. Thedykemarch.org. * '''Day of the Dead''' Each year on November 2, a memorial procession and celebration of the dead ( Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead)) occurs on Harrison and 24th Street with a gathering of memorials in Garfield Square. Day of Dead SF. Day of Dead SF. *San Francisco's Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco) is renowned for its densely-packed street art San Francisco Bay Guardian, Jan 18-24, 2012, p.22 along Mission Street, and all along both Clarion Alley and Balmy Alley. By 2010 street art was also being created in Hayes Valley (Hayes Valley, San Francisco), SoMa (South of Market, San Francisco), Bayview-Hunters Point (Bayview-Hunters Point, San Francisco) and the Tenderloin (Tenderloin, San Francisco). Chloe Veltman, "Street Art Moves Onto Some New Streets", ''New York Times, May 8, 2010 right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton.


national attention

November 9, 2011 In the last couple decades a number of mission restaurants have gained national attention, most notably the Michelin (Michelin Guide) two-star rated French restaurant Saison on Folsom Street. A large number of other restaurants are also popular, including: Mission Chinese Food, Mission Pie, Bar Tartine, La Taqueria, Papalote, and Foreign Cinema on Mission Street, Delfina on 18th, and Luna Park on Valencia. Bittman, Mark (May 29, 2011). http


title working

24245 Carlos-Loarca--Spirit-Dogs--Painting-the-Past-into-the-Present#.U8N2PNPfyPc title Carlos Loarca: Spirit Dogs, Painting the Past into the Present date accessdate July 14, 2014 website artdaily.org publisher Royalville Communications, Inc last Mezynski first Neila (painter, muralist) * Pico Sanchez


school art

to the Mission School art movement. Many studios, galleries, performance spaces, and public art projects are located in the Mission, including the Project Artaud, 1890 Bryant St Studios, Southern Exposure (Southern Exposure (art space)), Art Explosion Studios, City Art Collective Gallery, Artists' Television Access, and the oldest, alternative, not-for-profit art space in the city of San Francisco, Intersection for the Arts. There are more than 500 Mission artists listed on Mission


iconic

in many Central American banks and companies which would set up branches, offices, and regional headquarters on Mission Street. From the late 1990s through the 2010s, and especially during the dot-com boom, young urban professionals (yuppies), moved into the area, initiating gentrification, raising rent and housing prices,

: www.sfexaminer.com local 2011 12 changing-demographics-make-iconic-mission-melting-pot work SF Examiner accessdate 2011-12-19 quote These commingling cultural contrasts are at least part of what makes the Mission one of The City’s most popular and fascinating places. with a number of Latino American middle-class families as well as artists moving to the Outer Mission area, or out of the city entirely to the suburbs of East Bay (San Francisco Bay Area) East Bay


documentary amp

) * Ruby Neri (painter, sculptor, and graffiti artist) *Megan Wilson (conceptual, installation, and street artist) * Michael V. Rios ''The Art of Michael Rios''. Mvrios.com. (painter, designer, and muralist) * Xavier Viramontes Documentary, ''A Life in Print: Xavier Viramontes Printmaker''. Alifeinprint.net. (printmaker) * Scott Williams (Scott Williams (artist)) *San Francisco's Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco) is renowned for its densely-packed street art San Francisco Bay Guardian, Jan 18-24, 2012, p.22 along Mission Street, and all along both Clarion Alley and Balmy Alley. By 2010 street art was also being created in Hayes Valley (Hayes Valley, San Francisco), SoMa (South of Market, San Francisco), Bayview-Hunters Point (Bayview-Hunters Point, San Francisco) and the Tenderloin (Tenderloin, San Francisco). Chloe Veltman, "Street Art Moves Onto Some New Streets", ''New York Times, May 8, 2010 right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton.

Mission District, San Francisco

The '''Mission District''', also commonly called '''"The Mission"''', is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, USA (United States), originally known as "the Mission lands" ''Daily Alta California'' newspaper, Oct 7, 1854, page 1 column 4 meaning the lands belonging to the sixth Alta California mission (Spanish missions in California), Mission San Francisco de Asis. This mission, San Francisco's oldest standing building, is located in the northwest area of the neighborhood.

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