Miramichi, New Brunswick

What is Miramichi, New Brunswick known for?


historic place

Museum (c. 1908 to 1909) is designated as a Local Historic Place. Ritchie Wharf Ritchie Wharf is a park located on the waterfront of Newcastle-Miramichi. It is the location of many events that take place on the river, and is often the location of choice for local musicians. Its boardwalk is lined with restaurants, art galleries, and souvenir shops, and it is also the location of a tourist information


commercial ties

Although they were clearly preceded by the Mi'kmaq (Mi'kmaq people) and Acadian peoples, credit for the first permanent white settlement at Miramichi is often granted to Scottish settlers, led by William Davidson (William Davidson (lumberman)). William Davidson (a.k.a. John Godsman) and John Cort had obtained a large grant encompassing much of the Miramichi region in 1765, and promoted the area in both Scotland and New England as a new home to potential settlers. American Revolution and Battle at Miramichi (1779) At the beginning of the American Revolution the Mi’kmaq and Maliseet were supportive of the Americans against the British. They participated in the Maugerville Rebellion (Maugerville, New Brunswick) and the Battle of Fort Cumberland in 1776. Three years later, in June 1779, Mi’kmaq in the Miramichi attacked and plundered some of the British in the area. The following month, British Captain Augustus Harvey, in command of HMS ''Viper'', arrived in the area and battled with the Mi’kmaq. One Mi’kmaq was killed and 16 were taken prisoner to Quebec. The prisoners were eventually brought to Halifax, where they were later released upon signing an oath of allegiance to the British Crown on 28 July 1779. http: www.biographi.ca 009004-119.01-e.php?id_nbr 2486; Sessional papers, Volume 5 By Canada. Parliament July 2 – September 22, 1779; Wilfred Brenton Kerr. The Maritime Provinces of British North America and the American Revolution. p. 96 After the battle, Davidson temporarily found refuge along the Saint John River (Saint John River (Bay of Fundy)). A subsequent treaty signed 22 September 1779 ensured a more peaceful coexistence. Following the American Revolution some loyalist (Loyalist (American Revolution)) families moved to Miramichi. Davidson's original grant was revoked, and competition for the best lands escalated tensions between the early Scottish and new loyalist settlers. Great Miramichi Fire of 1825 See full article here (Miramichi Fire), a large forest fire that was one of worst in recorded history in North America. Devastated a number of communities in northern New Brunswick. Irish immigration (1815–1850) The Irish began arriving in Miramichi in numbers after 1815 at the end of the Napoleonic War and with a few exceptions ceased coming to the area before the great Irish famine of 1847. They came to the area voluntarily to better their lives. Contrary to prevailing belief, not all of them were Catholic though very few Protestants among them identified openly as Irish and most of their descendants in Miramichi do not do so even to this day. Most arrived form the ports of Belfast and Cork each of which had strong commercial ties with Miramichi. Like the Scots they came on timber ships as individuals or in small family groups and the average age upon arrival was twenty-four. There was some chain emigration whereby additional family members joined the emigrant later but this was minimal. The Miramichi River valley was not settled by large transplantations of Scottish clans or large scale movements of starving and evicted Irish. Though there are one or two interesting exceptions. In 1815 after trade had developed with Newfoundland, Miramichi was surprised and shaken by the arrival of the so-called "Two Boaters", perhaps as many as 2000. These were the Irish who had taken advantage of cheap fares to St.Johns in the spring and summer of 1815. They were mostly poor laborers and farmers and it seems that initially they settled mainly in the Chatham Douglastown area. With no prospect of obtaining a land grant jobs in the woods or in the mills were the only means of getting established. Most of them were able to get at least temporary employment upon arrival, but it was short lived. In 1819 a sharp decline in timber prices resulted in massive layoffs in Miramichi including most of the "Two Boat" Irish of the Chatham area. Following their grueling experience in St. Johns and now unemployed they became disenchanted by their new found misery so many miles from home. They began to create disturbances in the village of Chatham. Violent outrages were committed in broad daylight, property was stolen and in the worst cases houses and barns were burned to the ground. The people of the area soon dubbed then "those uncivilized immigrants from Ireland", whom local magistrates were powerless to control. But the Irish were not the only troublemakers along the river at that time. They were often mistakenly blamed for outrageous disturbances caused by unruly sailors idling about the port during the spring and summer months. These idle sailors whooped it up at Miramichi particularly on Sundays when the taverns were closed but often the Irish got the blame. In 1822 a detachment of the 78th regiment stationed in Fredericton was temporarily sent to Chatham to keep the peace. But it was not the soldiers of 78th regiment who quieted the Irish. It took an improved economy, jobs and new found opportunity to do the trick. The Looshtauk Tragedy (1847) Unlike the ports of Quebec, Saint John, St Andrews, Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Charleston and New Orleans, Miramichi did not receive large numbers of destitute and starving Irish during the famine years. Fewer than four so-called coffin ships made it to Miramichi between 1844 and 1849 with less than three hundred people on board. They were ships plying to Quebec with sick and dying passengers, stricken with cholera and other diseases. They diverted to 'Miramichi in desperation and on arrival were quarantined at Middle Island where they were treated in appalling conditions. There was great fear of them and some Miramichers including the Irish referred to them as ``yellow mealers` believing all they had had to eat was corn. The arrival of the famine ship Looshtauk on June 2, 1847, was a major tragedy at Miramichi. She left Liverpool for Quebec with 462 passengers on board. During the first two weeks at sea more than 100 died of sickness and the majority of the crew contracted severe fever and were unfit for duty. With only a few able seamen available to man the ship and few other options, the captain headed to the nearest port - Miramichi. When news of the dire conditions on board became known she was forbidden by the port authorities to dock even at Middle Island. The captain could not get permission to land the sick and dying or to bury the dead for over six days in which further severe anguish and the loss of forty more lives occurred. The arrival of two more famine ships the Richard White and the Bolivar further exacerbated the problem. The authorities finally but reluctantly constructed temporary shelters on the island and allowed the sick passengers and crew to land. A further fifty or so people died in the makeshift facilities provided, including the young Chatham doctor John Vondy who volunteered to stay full-time to administer to the sick and dying and within a few days succumbed to the fever himself. The Irish in the 1870s and 1880s By the 1870s the Irish were well established in Miramichi and by this decade less than 20% of them were recent immigrants. In total they represented forty percent of the population of the region spread fairly evenly over the entire Miramichi watershed. Eighty percent were Catholic and only the upriver parish of Ludlow had a Protestant Irish majority. By the 1880s they controlled 15% of businesses and professions in the town of Chatham and probably the same number in Newcastle. However the majority were still listed as skilled and unskilled workers. Industry and politics (1765–1850) thumb 200px Rankin House, former home of Miramichi lumber baron (File:Rankin House.jpg) Alexander Rankin at Douglastown (IR Walker 1983) Although subsistence farming constituted one part of the new settlement's economy, the thin, acid soils of the Miramichi were not conducive to agriculture; thus, the lumber industry and Atlantic salmon fishery were the mainstays. A shipbuilding industry was established by Davidson in 1773, largely to facilitate overseas lumber exports, including masts for the British navy, and to provide winter employment for the men. Davidson's first ship, "Miramichi", was lost with her cargo off the Spanish coast. Miramichi benefited greatly from the Napoleonic wars and American independence, as Britain became dependent on its remaining North American colonies, including New Brunswick, for lumber. However, the Great Miramichi Fire of 1825, the advent of steel-hulled ships, and perhaps over-cutting of eastern white pine, would eventually contribute to a long-term decline in the area's economy. The Miramichi Fire burnt almost 1 4 of New Brunswick's forest, and consumed most of the buildings along the northern side of the river. Only 12 buildings remained in Newcastle. The towns of Newcastle and Chatham developed a long history of rivalry, including a small "war" fought between the communities ("the fighting election of 1843"). The 1843 election was fought on a political level between John T. Williston of Chatham (supported by local entrepreneur Joseph Cunard of Chatham, brother of Samuel Cunard) and John Ambrose Street of Newcastle (backed by the prominent lumber baron, Alexander Rankin of Douglastown). The Rankin and Cunard factions literally fought the election in the streets of Newcastle (Newcastle, New Brunswick) and Chatham (Chatham, New Brunswick) with sticks, stones, coal and other missiles. Railway (1875–1950) In 1875 the region's largest construction project in history was completed when the federal government's Intercolonial Railway (ICR) opened between Moncton and Campbellton (Campbellton, New Brunswick). The following year it would link Halifax (Halifax Regional Municipality) with Rivière-du-Loup and the Canadian railway network. One of the biggest geographic obstacles presented in the project was the crossing of the Miramichi River. Surveyors deemed the ideal location for bridging to be at the upper reaches of tidewater between Nelson (Nelson, New Brunswick) and Newcastle (Newcastle, New Brunswick), crossing the Southwest Miramichi (Southwest Miramichi River), then a short section of land at Derby, followed by the Northwest Miramichi (Northwest Miramichi River). The combined length of these bridges would be among the largest constructed to date in Canada (surpassed only by the Victoria Bridge (Victoria Bridge (Montreal)) in Montreal) and were the first bridges


local buildings

private. French Fort Cove French Fort Cove is a nature park located between Newcastle and Nordin. The park contains regular and advanced walking trails, canoeing, kayaking, paddle-boats, a children's playground, and an ice-cream shop. The park holds many events and activities during the summer. It is the former site of a gristmill, lumber mill and shipyard. It is also the former location of a rock quarry which was used to build many local buildings and the Langevin Block of the Parliament Hill, among others. It is the setting for the local legend of the Headless Nun. "Story Quarry", ''French Fort Cove Nature Park''. Retrieved August 21, 2006. Middle Island thumb right 200px Irish Memorial on Middle Island (IR Walker 2007) (File:Middle Island Miramichi Memorial.JPG) Middle Island was used as a quarantine station when, in 1847, typhus and scarlet fever spread throughout the ship Looshtauk as it crossed the Atlantic Ocean. Of the 462 passengers on board, at least 146 people died en route and 96 died while in quarantine. south of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick, Canada. thumb 350px right A photograph of the Morrissy Bridge (Image:MorrissyBridge.png) The '''Morrissy Bridge''' is a steel truss bridge crossing the Miramichi River at Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick, Canada. Born in Newcastle, New Brunswick (now Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)), he graduated from the Dalhousie University law school in Halifax. In 1924, he moved to Vancouver, British Columbia and practised law. Other cities and towns also elected new mayors: * In '''Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)''', John McKay (John McKay (New Brunswick politician)) won in a close three-way battle against Frank Trevors and Gerry Cormier. Arch Pafford, better known for founding the Confederation of Regions Party of New Brunswick, finished a distant fourth. There was no incumbent, as former mayor Rupert Bernard decided to (successfully) run for a seat on city council instead. * In '''Edmundston''', Gérald Allain defeated incumbent Jacques Martin. * The City of '''Edmundston''' banned smoking (Tobacco smoking) in indoor public places by a margin of 74.1% to 25.9%. * The City of '''Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)''' voted to scrap the ward (ward (politics)) system of electing city council in favour of ten at-large councillors. The plebiscite passed 53.7% to 46.3%. * The Village of '''Belledune (Belledune, New Brunswick)''' decided to keep its ward system, by a margin of 63.3% to 36.7%. Malley, a former Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick) city councillor and bus driver, was first elected to the legislature in the 1999 election (New Brunswick general election, 1999) and was re-elected in 2003 (New Brunswick general election, 2003). '''Loggieville''' is a Canadian (Canada) suburban neighbourhood in the city of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick. The community is located at the mouth of the Miramichi River on the southern bank where the river estuary discharges into the bay. Named after the Loggie family who were prominent local merchants, Loggieville was an incorporated village in Northumberland County (Northumberland County, New Brunswick) until municipal amalgamation in 1995. Early life Foran was a member of the local school board and of the Newcastle municipal council for four terms, including service as deputy mayor and acting mayor prior to Newcastle becoming a part of the City of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick). When Miramichi became a city, Foran was made the superintendent (Superintendent (police)) of the Miramichi Police Force, having previously been the chief of police for Chatham (Chatham, New Brunswick). Situated on the north shore of Miramichi Bay at the southern end of the Acadian Peninsula, the village is located 44 kilometres northeast of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick). Approximately 92% of its residents are francophone. Siege of Thomaston, Maine During the French and Indian War, on 13 August 1758 French officer Boishebert left Miramichi, New Brunswick with 400 soldiers for Fort St George (Thomaston, Maine). His detachment reached there on 9 September but was caught in an ambush and had to withdraw. This was Boishébert’s last Acadian expedition. Phyllis E. Leblanc Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online; Cyrus Eaton's history, p. 77 death_date birth_place Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick resides Windsor (Windsor, Ontario), Ontario


quot story

of the Parliament Hill, among others. It is the setting for the local legend of the Headless Nun. "Story Quarry", ''French Fort Cove Nature Park''. Retrieved August 21, 2006. Middle Island thumb right 200px Irish Memorial on Middle Island (IR Walker 2007) (File:Middle Island Miramichi Memorial.JPG) Middle Island was used as a quarantine station when, in 1847, typhus and scarlet fever spread throughout


430

1982 election (New Brunswick general election, 1982) until the eve of the 1985 leadership race. McKenna won by significant margin. *Route 425 (New Brunswick Route 425) -- Red Bank - Sunny Corner - Whitney - Strathadam - Eel Ground - '''Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)''' *Route 430 (New Brunswick Route 430) -- '''Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)''' -- Heath Steele -- Bathurst Mines -- '''Bathurst (Bathurst, New Brunswick)''' *Route 435 (New Brunswick Route 435) -- Whitney

(Route 425) -- Maple Glen (Route 430) Acadians first arrived at Shediac in 1749 as a result of the Acadian Exodus from peninsular Nova Scotia. Webster, p. 3 During the French and Indian War, French officer Charles Deschamps de Boishebert (Charles Deschamps de Boishébert et de Raffetot) made his headquarters at both Shediac and Cocagne, New Brunswick. In the autumn of 1755, Boishebert established himself on the south shore of Cocagne Bay, place known

with Route 430 (New Brunswick Route 430) in Newcastle. Within the City of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick) the highway carries the local name '''King George Highway''' and passes through the former towns of Newcastle and Douglastown. At Douglastown the highway interchanges with Route 11 (New Brunswick Route 11) at the north abutment of the Centennial Bridge (Centennial Bridge (New Brunswick)) where Route 8 turns northward as a 2-lane expressway. It bypasses the village


business amp

Ground First Nation and Metepenagiag Mi'kmaq Nation * La Fête Nationale des Acadiens—Acadian Day * Miramichi Scottish Festival * Canada's Irish Festival on the Miramichi * Miramichi Fiddle Festival Other local festivals include: City of Miramichi, New Brunswick—Community, Business & Tourism * Canada Days


local historic

Museum (c. 1908 to 1909) is designated as a Local Historic Place. Ritchie Wharf Ritchie Wharf is a park located on the waterfront of Newcastle-Miramichi. It is the location of many events that take place on the river, and is often the location of choice for local musicians. Its boardwalk is lined with restaurants, art galleries, and souvenir shops, and it is also the location of a tourist information


international game

, Canada. Williams was named to the International Game Fish Association Hall of Fame in 2000. Thus, he is the only athlete to be inducted into the Halls of Fame of two different sports. Shortly after Williams's death, conservative pundit Steve Sailer wrote: Aitken was born in Maple, Ontario, Canada, (near Keele Street and Major Mackenzie Drive) in 1879, the son of a Scottish-born Presbyterian minister (Minister (religion)). The following year, his family moved


radio music

station will operate at 95.9 MHz. Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2011-675 Newcap also applied for a new radio station in Fredericton which will broadcast a contemporary hit radio music format. If approved, the new station will operate at 93.1 MHz. Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2011-675 president city Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), Moncton, Fredericton, Saint John (Saint John, New Brunswick), St. Andrews (St. Andrews, New Brunswick) and Woodstock (Woodstock, New Brunswick) In 1996, the provincial government imposed an amalgamation of all incorporated municipalities in the lower Miramichi River valley, creating the city of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick). Longtime residents regret the loss of the town's historic name and separate identity. In 1998, the federal government opened a Central Processing Site for the Canadian Firearms Program in Chatham. The office is dedicated to implementing the ''Firearms Act'', and will maintain the records of all registered firearms in the country. The office employs several hundred civil servants and has helped to offset employment losses from the base closure. CFP celebrated the 10th anniversary of the opening of Central Processing Site in Miramichi, New Brunswick in 2008. 10th anniversary of the Canadian Firearms Program's Central Processing Site, Miramichi, N.B. Design '''St. Michael's Basilica''' in Miramichi, New Brunswick, is among the largest churches in Canada, east of Quebec City. The sandstone neo-Gothic structure was designed by the same architect (P. Keely) as Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago, Ste. Peter and Paul Cathedral in Providence, Rhode Island and the Church of the Gesu in Montreal. St. Michael's Basilica is 15 feet taller than Holy Name in Chicago, somewhat narrower and about the same length, Holy Name seats about 300 more people ( 1,520 vs 1,200). Construction on the cathedral started in 1903 and finished in 1921. Italian marble with veined panels was used throughout the interior of the nave and the sacristy.It is visible for miles especially as Chatham is approached from the north, across the Centennial Bridge spanning the Miramichi River. The city of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick) is best known for its country and bluegrass music, featuring a blend of Acadian, Irish and Scot's traditional style of music. The Miramichi Folksong Festival preserves the history and rich musical traditions of northeastern New Brunswick. Ganong also comments on the origin of the name, noting that in 1758, during the Gulf of St. Lawrence Campaign (1758), British General James Wolfe directed Colonel James Murray (James Murray (British army officer)) to destroy the French settlements at Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick). Thus, Murray destroyed an Acadian community which had been established at Burnt Church, including burning the first stone church built in New Brunswick (hence the name). '''Maurice A. Dionne''' (1936 in Bath, New Brunswick – November 17, 2003 in Miramichi, New Brunswick) was an educator and politician in the Miramichi River Valley of New Brunswick, Canada. Notable people * Max Aitken, Better known as ''First Baron Beaverbrook'', was born in the St Andrew's Presbyterian Church (Presbyterian Church in Canada) Manse in 1879. His father left for a congregation in Newcastle (Miramichi, New Brunswick) New Brunswick the following year. There is a plaque outside the Church, noting that as Lord Beaverbrook, he donated a carillon. south of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick, Canada. thumb 350px right A photograph of the Morrissy Bridge (Image:MorrissyBridge.png) The '''Morrissy Bridge''' is a steel truss bridge crossing the Miramichi River at Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick, Canada. Born in Newcastle, New Brunswick (now Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)), he graduated from the Dalhousie University law school in Halifax. In 1924, he moved to Vancouver, British Columbia and practised law. Other cities and towns also elected new mayors: * In '''Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)''', John McKay (John McKay (New Brunswick politician)) won in a close three-way battle against Frank Trevors and Gerry Cormier. Arch Pafford, better known for founding the Confederation of Regions Party of New Brunswick, finished a distant fourth. There was no incumbent, as former mayor Rupert Bernard decided to (successfully) run for a seat on city council instead. * In '''Edmundston''', Gérald Allain defeated incumbent Jacques Martin. * The City of '''Edmundston''' banned smoking (Tobacco smoking) in indoor public places by a margin of 74.1% to 25.9%. * The City of '''Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick)''' voted to scrap the ward (ward (politics)) system of electing city council in favour of ten at-large councillors. The plebiscite passed 53.7% to 46.3%. * The Village of '''Belledune (Belledune, New Brunswick)''' decided to keep its ward system, by a margin of 63.3% to 36.7%. Malley, a former Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick) city councillor and bus driver, was first elected to the legislature in the 1999 election (New Brunswick general election, 1999) and was re-elected in 2003 (New Brunswick general election, 2003). '''Loggieville''' is a Canadian (Canada) suburban neighbourhood in the city of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick. The community is located at the mouth of the Miramichi River on the southern bank where the river estuary discharges into the bay. Named after the Loggie family who were prominent local merchants, Loggieville was an incorporated village in Northumberland County (Northumberland County, New Brunswick) until municipal amalgamation in 1995. Early life Foran was a member of the local school board and of the Newcastle municipal council for four terms, including service as deputy mayor and acting mayor prior to Newcastle becoming a part of the City of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick). When Miramichi became a city, Foran was made the superintendent (Superintendent (police)) of the Miramichi Police Force, having previously been the chief of police for Chatham (Chatham, New Brunswick). Situated on the north shore of Miramichi Bay at the southern end of the Acadian Peninsula, the village is located 44 kilometres northeast of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick). Approximately 92% of its residents are francophone. Siege of Thomaston, Maine During the French and Indian War, on 13 August 1758 French officer Boishebert left Miramichi, New Brunswick with 400 soldiers for Fort St George (Thomaston, Maine). His detachment reached there on 9 September but was caught in an ambush and had to withdraw. This was Boishébert’s last Acadian expedition. Phyllis E. Leblanc Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online; Cyrus Eaton's history, p. 77 death_date birth_place Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick), New Brunswick resides Windsor (Windsor, Ontario), Ontario


including service

into the bay. Named after the Loggie family who were prominent local merchants, Loggieville was an incorporated village in Northumberland County (Northumberland County, New Brunswick) until municipal amalgamation in 1995. Early life Foran was a member of the local school board and of the Newcastle municipal council for four terms, including service as deputy mayor and acting mayor prior to Newcastle becoming a part of the City of Miramichi (Miramichi, New Brunswick). When

Miramichi, New Brunswick

'''Miramichi''' ˈmɛɚˌməˌʃi is the largest city in northern New Brunswick, Canada. New Brunswick Provincial Archives – Miramichi It is situated at the mouth of the Miramichi River where it enters Miramichi Bay. The Miramichi River valley is the second longest valley in New Brunswick, after the Saint John River Valley.

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