Mexico City

What is Mexico City known for?


regular low

; The airline operates scheduled flights to 25 domestic and 4 international destinations out of Toluca Airport (Lic. Adolfo López Mateos International Airport) and Mexico City International Airport. It is wholly owned by the Aleman Group. It is one of the first regular low-cost airlines (low-cost carrier) of Mexico and claims


huge impressive

and amblers alike. Museums Mexico is the city with the largest number of museums in the world, to name some of the most popular: * Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


performing open

denominated IMECA (Metropolitan Index for Air Quality) in order to make the population aware of the current air pollution situation. When the index exceeds 170 points, an "Environmental pre-contingency" is issued and people are asked to refrain from performing open-air activities such as sports. In the case of an "Environmental Contingency," only vehicles with a zero or double zero emissions sticker can circulate. Earthquakes The catastrophic earthquake of 8.1 magnitude


century home

that they anchor, in department stores, big-box stores and in modern shopping malls. Traditional markets left thumb Informal markets are found in public spaces throughout the city (File:CallejonCondesaDF.JPG) thumb Multi-storey Sanborns (File:Sanborns DF.jpg) department store with the façade of a 19th-century home being used as an entrance area File:LitDecorationsWestZocaloGrito2010.JPG thumb left Decorated façade

DF.jpg thumb left Modern multistory Sanborns department store in Mexico City with the facade of a 19th century home being used as an entrance aerea The retail company was founded in Mexico City on June 19, 1903 by California immigrants Walter and Frank Sanborn, who also opened Mexico's first soda fountain. The original location and its lunch counter, across from the main Mexico City post office (''Palacio de Correos'') is still in operation. Biography Born in Bohemia


international focus

classes. In 1968 Mexico City became the first city in the Spanish and Portuguese speaking world to be chosen to host an Olympic Games. Using the international focus on the country, students at the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) protested the lack of democracy and social justice. President Gustavo Díaz Ordaz (1964–1970) ordered the army to occupy the university to suppress the revolt and minimize the disruption of the Olympic Games. On October 2, 1968 student groups demanding the withdrawal of the IPN protested at the Plaza de las Tres Culturas. Unaccustomed to this type of protests, the Mexican Government made an unusual move by asking the United States for assistance, through LITEMPO, a spy-program to inform the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) of the US to obtain information from Mexico. The CIA responded by sending military radios, weapons and ammunition. ''The Tlatelolco Massacre'', Kate Doyle. The LITEMPO had previously provided the Díaz Ordaz government with 1,000 rounds of .223 Remington ammunition in 1963. ''Documents link past presidents to CIA'', October 20, 2006. During the protests shots were fired and a number of students died (officially 39, although hundreds are claimed) and hundreds were arrested. The President of the Olympic Committee then declared that the protests were against the government and not the Olympics so the games proceeded. ''1968: Student riots threaten Mexico Olympics'', BBC, October 2, 1968. birth_date Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


art book

history jtuck jtorozco.html publisher Mexico Connect accessdate 2007-09-21 Orozco was known for being a politically committed artist. He promoted the political causes of peasants and workers. thumb 300px The gay portion of the Playa de Los Muertos (Beach of The Dead) (File:Playa de Los Muertos.jpg) Guadalajara, Jalisco Guadalajara


aggressive driving

aggressive driving habits as a result of the frequent traffic jams in the city. Some traffic signals are more an ornament than what they were made for, such as Stop signs, although most people respect traffic lights and pedestrian ways. When traffic is not present, particularly at night, locals tend to speed up so be careful when changing lanes. Street names and road signs may not be present everywhere so it is strongly advisable to ask for directions before driving your car. Sometimes potholes, fissures, and large-yet-unanticipated speed-bumps ("topes") are common on the roads, so exercise some caution. Even at a small crawl, these can damage a car, especially in the backroads between towns in the Southern area. It should be avised that when driving, a fast succession of white lines cutting the road perpendicular means a 'tope' is approaching and you should slow down immediately. When off the main roads, especially in the ''colonias'', maneuvering in the narrow streets and alleys can be tricky. Often a paved road turns to cobblestone (in high-end neighborhoods) or dirt (if this happens, you've gone way off the tourist areas). Also, some ''colonia'' streets are blocked off behind gates. If you are driving through a housing development, you should beware of children, as they often run on the pavement as if they were in their backyard. You should also be mindful of people on bicycles and motorcycles alike, because they tend to drive in the narrow spaces between cars. The best thing to do is to yield to them. Trolleys have the right of way on their assigned lane, since they cannot switch lanes as easily. Those who are used to having a berm or paved area to the side of the road will quickly notice that the berm is missing on many roads and freeways such as Viaducto and Periferico. If you go off the side of the road, there will be a four to six inch drop off of the pavement. Driving in Mexico City should be avoided if at all possible. It should also be noted that in high density areas such as Centro Historico, Mexico City, there is no street parking available during business hours. Even the best of plans can go wrong when you arrive at your proposed exit at 65 mph, and there is a detour onto some other road with no markings or road signs, with everyone going as fast as they can go. At that point you may want to exit immediately and regroup before you end up miles from where you planned to exit. Maps and road signs likely will be lacking any usable information in a situation like this and your best bet may be to navigate by the seat of your pants a parallel route to the one you found closed. Drinking In many nightclubs, bars and restaurants it is common for minors to drink without proving their age as long as they appear to be over 18. It is also permitted for minors to drink alcohol if they are in the company of an adult who is willing to take responsibility. Drinking alcoholic beverages in the street is prohibited—doing so can get you in trouble with the police. Drunk driving is also strictly prohibited and strongly punished, though it seems highly common in any case. The police have incorporated random alcohol tests on streets near bars and clubs, and if you test positive, you could be arrested and spend 36 hours in jail. The system is very efficient, and you will sometimes see a stopped car or truck with a policeman interrogating the occupants. Smoking Smoking inside public and private buildings is strictly prohibited by law. Restaurants used to have smoking and non-smoking sections, but recent laws have banned smoking in any public enclosed space. Fines can be steep, so if you want to smoke in a restaurant it is best to ask the waiter before lighting up. Of course, going outside is always an option. Smoking light drugs, such as marijuana, is prohibited and offenders could be imprisoned if found in possession of more than one personal dose. Embassies Mexico City is home to a large number of embassies. * Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


traditional top

rights recognized, perhaps due to U.S. influence as many league matches are aired in the U.S., where only traditional top-flight teams are perceived to most effectively reach the immigrant fanbase). Club Necaxa also moved from Mexico City to Aguascalientes. Relocations are also common when an amateur or semi-professional club tries to acquire its own facilities in order to become a professional club, and no money and or space is available to build their own in a long-established location


character played

then studied at the Centro de Capacitación Cinematográfica ("Center of Film Training") in Mexico City. He obtained roles in prominent films such as ''Rojo amanecer'' and in 1991 a role in ''El patrullero'' for which he would received his first of many nominations to the Ariel Award of the Mexican Academy of Film. In 1995, he starred as the love interest of the character played by the also Mexican actress Salma Hayek in ''El callejón de los milagros'', a film of critical and financial success. Over the next 30 years, the party had some minor influence in the Confederation of Mexican Workers (CTM) and among the intelligentsia of Mexico City. In the mid 1960s the U.S. State Department estimated the party membership to be approximately 50,000 (0.28% of the working age population of the country). Benjamin, Roger W.; Kautsky, John H.. ''Communism and Economic Development'', in The American Political Science Review, Vol. 62, No. 1. (March 1968), p. 122. In Mexico City, Brough finished behind the United States world record holder Mike Burton (Mike Burton (swimmer)) and his teammate John Kinsella (John Kinsella (swimmer)). He also finished fourth in the 400 m, also won by Burton. At the 1970 Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Brough won a bronze in the 400 m behind fellow Australian Graham White. 1980s - A star is born The year 1980 marks the beginning of the career of a charismatic girl named Lucerito, who was born on the late 1960s in Mexico City. When she was too young, Lucerito always had concerns about being an artist, but at her 10 years of age Televisa offered her the first opportunity for a juvenile theme program named Alegrías de Mediodía (Alegrías De Mediodía) (''Eng: Midday Happiness''), next to several children and young talents in music and comedy, like Aida Pierce, Aleks Syntek among others. Lucerito combined their work with their academic studies, she also prepared taking singing and dancing lessons for a better and safer development on the stage; at that time she also performed in the program Juguemos a Cantar (''Eng: Let's play to sing''), which she was the interpreter of the theme. Following these opportunities, Lucerito received several offers in different programs, among them Chiquilladas (''Eng: Childishness''), making her first stellar appearance in the series for children, where one of her more popular roles was in a Popeye skit as Olive Oil. birth_date Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


art artistic

is an important cultural center. Having been capital of a vast pre-Hispanic empire, and also the capital of richest viceroyalty within the Spanish Empire (ruling over a vast territory in the Americas and Spanish West Indies), and, finally, the capital of the United Mexican States, Mexico City has a rich history of artistic expression (Mexican art). Since the mesoamerican pre-Classical period the inhabitants of the settlements around Lake Texcoco produced many works of art and complex

Mexico City

imagesize image_caption anthem image_map Distrito Federal en México.svg map_caption México City within Mexico latd 19 latm 26 lats latNS N longd 99 longm 8 longs longEW W coor_pinpoint coordinates_type coordinates_display inline,title coordinates_footnotes coordinates_region MX subdivision_type Country subdivision_name subdivision_type1 Entity (Political divisions of Mexico) subdivision_name1 Federal District (Administrative divisions of Mexico#Federal district) subdivision_type2 Subdivisions subdivision_name2 title Boroughs (Mexico City's boroughs) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none; 1 Álvaro Obregón (Álvaro Obregón, D.F.) 2 Azcapotzalco 3 Benito Juárez (Benito Juárez, D.F.) 4 Coyoacán 5 Cuajimalpa 6 Cuauhtémoc (Cuauhtémoc, D.F.) 7 Gustavo A. Madero (Gustavo A. Madero, D.F.) 8 Iztacalco 9 Iztapalapa 10 Magdalena Contreras 11 Miguel Hidalgo (Miguel Hidalgo, D.F.) 12 Milpa Alta 13 Tláhuac 14 Tlalpan 15 Venustiano Carranza (Venustiano Carranza, D.F.) 16 Xochimilco established_title Founded established_date * March 13, 1325: Mexico-Tenochtitlan * August 13, 1521: Ciudad de México * November 18, 1824: Distrito Federal founder seat_type seat government_footnotes leader_party leader_title Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) leader_name PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 23px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Miguel Ángel Mancera leader_title1 Senators (Senate of Mexico) Senate of Mexico website: LXII & LXIII legislatures, Distrito Federal. Retrieved November 26, 2013 leader_name1 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mario Martín Delgado PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandra Barrales PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Pablo Escudero Morales ul_style margin-bottom:5px; li_style margin-bottom:3px; leader_title2 Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) leader_name2 title Federal Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none;padding-bottom:3px; 1 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Armando Báez Pinal 2 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Marco Antonio García 3 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Cuauhtémoc Gutiérrez 4 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada 5 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Roberto Rebollo 6 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Robles 7 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Claudia Ruiz Massieu 8 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Castilla 9 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Gabriela Cuevas (Gabriela Cuevas Barron) 10 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César González 11 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Paz Gutiérrez 12 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Valdemar Gutiérrez 13 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Kenia López 14 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César Nava 15 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Rosi Orozco 16 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Silvia Pérez Ceballos 17 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Ezequiel Rétiz 18 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Esthela Damián 19 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Luis Felipe Eguía 20 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandro Encinas (Alejandro Encinas Rodríguez) 21 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Guerrero 22 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Francisco Hernández 23 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Héctor Hernández 24 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Teresa Incháustegui 25 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Ramón Jiménez 26 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Vidal Llerenas 27 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Avelino Méndez 28 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Eduardo Mendoza 29 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Nazario Norberto 30 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Quezada 31 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Rigoberto Salgado 32 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Arturo Santana 33 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Emilio Serrano 34 PRD Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mauricio Toledo 35 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Enoé Uranga (Enoé Margarita Uranga Muñoz) 36 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Balfre Vargas 37 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Araceli Vázquez (María Araceli Vázquez Camacho) 38 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Jesús Zambrano 39 Rosario Brindis 40 Pablo Escudero 41 Clara Salinas Sada 42 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Jaime Cárdenas 43 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Itzel Castillo 44 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Mario di Costanzo 45 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Fernández 46 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Ifigenia Martínez 47 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Porfirio Muñoz Ledo 48 Víctor Hugo Círigo 49 Laura Piña Olmedo 50 PNA link New Alliance Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PNA Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Del Mazo 51 María Quiñones unit_pref Metric area_footnotes area_total_km2 1485 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_water_percent area_note Ranked 32nd (List of Mexican states by area) elevation_m 2250 elevation_max_footnotes elevation_max_m 3930 elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft population_footnotes population_total 8,851,080 population_as_of 2010 population_rank 2nd (List of Mexican states by population) population_density_km2 auto population_density_rank 1st (List of Mexican states by population density) population_urban 21.2 million population_demonym population_note timezone1 CST (Central Time Zone) utc_offset1 −6 timezone1_DST CDT (Central Daylight Time) utc_offset1_DST −5 postal_code_type Postal code (Postal codes in Mexico) postal_code 00–16 area_code_type Area code area_code 55 iso_code MX-DFE blank_name_sec1 HDI (Human Development Index) blank_info_sec1 0.8307 '''Very High''' Ranked 1st of 32 (List of Mexican states by HDI) blank_name_sec2 GDP blank_info_sec2 $411.4 billion dollars (American Dollar) website footnotes b. Area of the Federal District (Mexican Federal District) that includes non-urban areas at the south '''Mexico City''' ( It is a federal entity within Mexico which is not part of any one of the 31 Mexican states (States of Mexico) but belongs to the federation as a whole. Mexico City is the country's largest city as well as its most important political, cultural, educational and financial center.

As an "alpha" global city . The city consists of sixteen boroughs (Boroughs of the Mexican Federal District).

The 2009 estimated population for the city proper was around 8.84 million people,

The Greater Mexico City has a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$411 billion in 2011, making Mexico City urban agglomeration (Greater Mexico City) one of the richest metropolitan areas in the world (List of cities by GDP). Global MetroMonitor Brookings Institution. Brookings.edu. Retrieved on April 12, 2014. The city was responsible for generating 15.8% of Mexico's Gross Domestic Product and the metropolitan area accounted for about 22% of total national GDP.

Mexico’s capital is both the oldest capital city in the Americas (List of cities by time of continuous habitation#America, Middle) and one of two founded by Amerindians (Native Americans), the other being Quito. The city was originally built on an island of Lake Texcoco by the Aztecs in 1325 as Tenochtitlan, which was almost completely destroyed in the 1521 siege of Tenochtitlan (Fall of Tenochtitlan), and subsequently redesigned and rebuilt in accordance with the Spanish urban standards (Spanish architecture#Spanish Colonial architecture). In 1524, the municipality (Municipalities of Mexico) of Mexico City was established, known as ''México Tenochtitlán'', and as of 1585 it was officially known as ''Ciudad de México'' (Mexico City). After independence from Spain (Mexican War of Independence) was achieved, the Federal District (#Federal District) was created in 1824.

After years of demanding greater political autonomy, residents were given the right to directly elect the Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) and the representatives of the unicameral (unicameralism) Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of the Federal District) by popular vote (Election) in 1997. Ever since, the left-wing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) has controlled both of them. Daniel C. Schechter, Josephine Quintero. ''Lonely Planet Mexico City, City Guide With Pullout Map ''. Third Edition. Lonely Planet, 2008. p. 288 (p. 20-21). ISBN 978-1-74059-182-9. In recent years, the local government has passed a wave of liberal policies, such as abortion (Abortion in Mexico) on request, a limited form of euthanasia (Euthanasia in Mexico), no-fault divorce and same-sex marriage (Same-sex marriage in Mexico City).

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