Mexico City

What is Mexico City known for?


great hit

; After appearing in a number of shows, she came to the fore in 1985 in ''Donna Giovanni'', an all-female adaptation of Mozart's opera (Don Giovanni), which was directed by Jesusa Rodríguez and became a great hit in Europe


important contemporary

sculpture at important contemporary art galleries in Palo Alto, Los Angeles, New York City, London, Cologne, and Essen, Germany. He lived in London for a period before settling in Los Angeles in the early 1970s. His first solo exhibition in a museum was at the Dallas Museum of Art in 1972. Since then he has had dozens of one-man shows, including several at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. DATE OF BIRTH August 19, 1938 PLACE OF BIRTH Mexico City, Mexico DATE


political event

into the New World. The Spanish Conquest of Mexico (Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire) was not only a political event for the Spanish, but a religious event as well. In the early 16th century, the Reformation (Protestant Reformation), the Counter-Reformation and the Inquisition were in full force in most of Europe. The Spaniards had just re-conquered the Iberian Peninsula, giving them special status within the Roman Catholic realm, including great liberties in the conversion of the native peoples of Mesoamerica. When the Inquisition was brought to the New World, it was employed for many of the same reasons and against the same social groups as suffered in Europe itself, minus the Indians to a large extent. Almost all of events associated with the official establishment of the Holy Office of the Inquisition occurred in Mexico City, where the Holy Office had its own “palace”, which is now the Museum of Medicine of UNAM on Republica de Brasil street. The official period of the Inquisition lasted from 1571 to 1820, with an unknown number of victims. Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


classic playing

). The 2011 Pan American Games were the third Pan American Games hosted by Mexico (the first country to do so) and the first held in the state of Jalisco. Previously, Mexico hosted the 1955 Pan American Games and the 1975 Pan American Games, both in Mexico City. The 2011 Parapan American Games were held 20 days after the Pan American Games have ended. 2009 Cuba again participated in the 2009 World Baseball Classic, playing its first round games in Pool B at Foro Sol


outstanding portraits

, exhibiting annually at the Academia de Bellas Artes. He produced outstanding portraits, including those of Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte (1808) in France and General Mariano Arista (1851; Mexico City, Mus. N. Hist.). His most important works in Mexico were costumbrista genre scenes. He died in his home town of Saint-Quentin. thumb 240px Justo Sierra. (File:Justo Sierra.jpg) '''Justo Sierra Méndez''' (Campeche, México, January 26, 1848 - Madrid, Spain, September 13, 1912


breaking time

in world record breaking time. In 2000 UNESCO proclaimed Ciudad Universitaria de Caracas in Caracas, Venezuela, as a World Heritage Site, describing it as "a masterpiece of modern city planning, architecture and art, created by the Venezuelan architect Carlos Raúl Villanueva and a group of distinguished avant-garde artists". In June 2007 UNESCO proclaimed Ciudad Universitaria of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de


modern poetry

studied in Mexico City. In August 1921, along with Vicente Lombardo Toledano, Diego Rivera, José Clemente Orozco and Xavier Guerrero, he founded the Grupo Solidario del Movimiento Obrero ("Solidarity Group of the Workers' Movement"). He lectured in modern poetry at the National Autonomous University of Mexico and served as the director of the Department of Fine Arts. He helped establish a number of museums, including the Frida Kahlo and Anahuacalli museums in Mexico City. In 1976 he was elected to the Senate (Senate of Mexico), representing Tabasco for the PRI (Partido Revolucionario Institucional). *Federal District **Mexico City – Mexico City International Airport ''Hub'' * *Guanajuato History After the war and the presidency of Robert E. Lee, the Confederate government expressed increasingly imperialistic (imperialism) ambitions. Confederate forces first invaded Mexico, then continued south and conquered the whole of South America Jules Verne, in his 1895 novel "Propeller Island", envisioned the (undivided) United States conquering and annexing the whole of South America before moving west to Pacific islands such as Hawaii. The Confederacy thrived as cities like Washington-Baltimore (merged from Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Alexandria (Alexandria, Virginia)) and Leesburg (formerly Mexico City) became renowned international centers of culture and learning. The Confederacy stood as one of the world's two superpowers following the German Union's victory in the Emperors' War, fought in Europe from 1914 to 1916. The German Union swiftly advanced across most of Europe from the Baltic Sea to the Balkans and formed an alliance with a rejuvenated Spanish Empire. To maintain the balance of power (Balance of power in international relations), the Confederacy purchased Alaska from Russia and allied with the British Empire. Tensions grew between the two nations up until the 1950s, and people around the world lived under constant threat of impending war, with the defenseless United States certain to be the battleground. At its source, it serves as a channel for water-drainage for Mexico City. From there, it becomes the state border between Hidalgo (Hidalgo (state)) and Querétaro as it moves towards San Luis Potosí. It takes the name ''Río Pánuco'' upon reaching Veracruz. It empties into the Gulf at Tampico (Tampico, Tamaulipas) and Ciudad Madero, on the border between the states (Political divisions of Mexico) of Tamaulipas and Veracruz. Most Mexicans of Basque descent are concentrated in the cities of Monterrey, Saltillo, Camargo (Camargo, Chihuahua), and the states of Jalisco, Durango, Nuevo León, Tamaulipas, and Coahuila. The Basques were important in the mining industry, many were ranchers and vaqueros (cowboys), and the rest small shops owners in major cities like Mexico City, Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Mexico) and Puebla. - Mexico City Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


distinctive sound

Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


feature articles

of Crane by friend and photographer Corwin Knapp Linson. Linson said the author's profile reminded him "of the young Napoleon (Napoleon I of France)—but not so hard, Steve." Davis, p. 80 At the end of January 1895, Crane left on what he called "a very long and circuitous newspaper trip" to the west. Davis, p. 99 While writing feature articles for the Bacheller syndicate, he traveled to Saint Louis, Missouri, Nebraska, New Orleans, Galveston, Texas and then Mexico City. Wertheim (1994), p. 121 Irving Bacheller would later state that he "sent Crane to Mexico for new color", Stallman, p. 141 which the author found in the form of Mexican slum life. Whereas he found the lower class in New York pitiful, he was impressed by the "superiority" of the Mexican peasants' contentment and "even refuse d to pity them." Stallman, p. 144 Returning to New York five months later, Crane joined the Lantern (alternately spelled "Lanthom" or "Lanthorne") Club organized by a group of young writers and journalists. Wertheim (1994), p. 132 The Club, located on the roof of an old house on William Street near the Brooklyn Bridge, served as a drinking establishment (public house) of sorts and was made to look like a ship's cabin. Davis, p. 119 There Crane ate one good meal a day, although friends were troubled by his "constant smoking, too much coffee, lack of food and poor teeth", as Nelson Greene put it. Davis, p. 120 Living in near-poverty and greatly anticipating the publication of his books, Crane began work on two more novels: ''The Third Violet'' and ''George's Mother''. History The first significant contact of the Quechan with Europeans (European colonization of the Americas) was with the Spanish (Spanish colonization of the Americas) explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and his party in the winter of 1774. Relations were friendly. On Anza's return from his second trip to Alta California in 1776, the chief (Tribal chief) of the tribe and three of his men journeyed to Mexico City to petition the Viceroy of New Spain for the establishment of a mission (Mission (station)). The chief Palma and his three companions were baptized in Mexico City on February 13, 1777. Palma was given the Spanish baptismal name ''Salvador Carlos Antonio''. Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


support band

; Garbage had just completed a second support slot (support band) on U2's Elevation Tour in Miami, Florida;

Mexico City

imagesize image_caption anthem image_map Distrito Federal en México.svg map_caption México City within Mexico latd 19 latm 26 lats latNS N longd 99 longm 8 longs longEW W coor_pinpoint coordinates_type coordinates_display inline,title coordinates_footnotes coordinates_region MX subdivision_type Country subdivision_name subdivision_type1 Entity (Political divisions of Mexico) subdivision_name1 Federal District (Administrative divisions of Mexico#Federal district) subdivision_type2 Subdivisions subdivision_name2 title Boroughs (Mexico City's boroughs) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none; 1 Álvaro Obregón (Álvaro Obregón, D.F.) 2 Azcapotzalco 3 Benito Juárez (Benito Juárez, D.F.) 4 Coyoacán 5 Cuajimalpa 6 Cuauhtémoc (Cuauhtémoc, D.F.) 7 Gustavo A. Madero (Gustavo A. Madero, D.F.) 8 Iztacalco 9 Iztapalapa 10 Magdalena Contreras 11 Miguel Hidalgo (Miguel Hidalgo, D.F.) 12 Milpa Alta 13 Tláhuac 14 Tlalpan 15 Venustiano Carranza (Venustiano Carranza, D.F.) 16 Xochimilco established_title Founded established_date * March 13, 1325: Mexico-Tenochtitlan * August 13, 1521: Ciudad de México * November 18, 1824: Distrito Federal founder seat_type seat government_footnotes leader_party leader_title Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) leader_name PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 23px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Miguel Ángel Mancera leader_title1 Senators (Senate of Mexico) Senate of Mexico website: LXII & LXIII legislatures, Distrito Federal. Retrieved November 26, 2013 leader_name1 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mario Martín Delgado PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandra Barrales PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Pablo Escudero Morales ul_style margin-bottom:5px; li_style margin-bottom:3px; leader_title2 Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) leader_name2 title Federal Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none;padding-bottom:3px; 1 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Armando Báez Pinal 2 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Marco Antonio García 3 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Cuauhtémoc Gutiérrez 4 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada 5 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Roberto Rebollo 6 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Robles 7 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Claudia Ruiz Massieu 8 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Castilla 9 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Gabriela Cuevas (Gabriela Cuevas Barron) 10 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César González 11 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Paz Gutiérrez 12 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Valdemar Gutiérrez 13 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Kenia López 14 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César Nava 15 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Rosi Orozco 16 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Silvia Pérez Ceballos 17 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Ezequiel Rétiz 18 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Esthela Damián 19 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Luis Felipe Eguía 20 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandro Encinas (Alejandro Encinas Rodríguez) 21 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Guerrero 22 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Francisco Hernández 23 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Héctor Hernández 24 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Teresa Incháustegui 25 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Ramón Jiménez 26 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Vidal Llerenas 27 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Avelino Méndez 28 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Eduardo Mendoza 29 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Nazario Norberto 30 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Quezada 31 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Rigoberto Salgado 32 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Arturo Santana 33 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Emilio Serrano 34 PRD Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mauricio Toledo 35 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Enoé Uranga (Enoé Margarita Uranga Muñoz) 36 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Balfre Vargas 37 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Araceli Vázquez (María Araceli Vázquez Camacho) 38 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Jesús Zambrano 39 Rosario Brindis 40 Pablo Escudero 41 Clara Salinas Sada 42 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Jaime Cárdenas 43 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Itzel Castillo 44 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Mario di Costanzo 45 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Fernández 46 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Ifigenia Martínez 47 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Porfirio Muñoz Ledo 48 Víctor Hugo Círigo 49 Laura Piña Olmedo 50 PNA link New Alliance Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PNA Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Del Mazo 51 María Quiñones unit_pref Metric area_footnotes area_total_km2 1485 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_water_percent area_note Ranked 32nd (List of Mexican states by area) elevation_m 2250 elevation_max_footnotes elevation_max_m 3930 elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft population_footnotes population_total 8,851,080 population_as_of 2010 population_rank 2nd (List of Mexican states by population) population_density_km2 auto population_density_rank 1st (List of Mexican states by population density) population_urban 21.2 million population_demonym population_note timezone1 CST (Central Time Zone) utc_offset1 −6 timezone1_DST CDT (Central Daylight Time) utc_offset1_DST −5 postal_code_type Postal code (Postal codes in Mexico) postal_code 00–16 area_code_type Area code area_code 55 iso_code MX-DFE blank_name_sec1 HDI (Human Development Index) blank_info_sec1 0.8307 '''Very High''' Ranked 1st of 32 (List of Mexican states by HDI) blank_name_sec2 GDP blank_info_sec2 $411.4 billion dollars (American Dollar) website footnotes b. Area of the Federal District (Mexican Federal District) that includes non-urban areas at the south '''Mexico City''' ( It is a federal entity within Mexico which is not part of any one of the 31 Mexican states (States of Mexico) but belongs to the federation as a whole. Mexico City is the country's largest city as well as its most important political, cultural, educational and financial center.

As an "alpha" global city . The city consists of sixteen boroughs (Boroughs of the Mexican Federal District).

The 2009 estimated population for the city proper was around 8.84 million people,

The Greater Mexico City has a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$411 billion in 2011, making Mexico City urban agglomeration (Greater Mexico City) one of the richest metropolitan areas in the world (List of cities by GDP). Global MetroMonitor Brookings Institution. Brookings.edu. Retrieved on April 12, 2014. The city was responsible for generating 15.8% of Mexico's Gross Domestic Product and the metropolitan area accounted for about 22% of total national GDP.

Mexico’s capital is both the oldest capital city in the Americas (List of cities by time of continuous habitation#America, Middle) and one of two founded by Amerindians (Native Americans), the other being Quito. The city was originally built on an island of Lake Texcoco by the Aztecs in 1325 as Tenochtitlan, which was almost completely destroyed in the 1521 siege of Tenochtitlan (Fall of Tenochtitlan), and subsequently redesigned and rebuilt in accordance with the Spanish urban standards (Spanish architecture#Spanish Colonial architecture). In 1524, the municipality (Municipalities of Mexico) of Mexico City was established, known as ''México Tenochtitlán'', and as of 1585 it was officially known as ''Ciudad de México'' (Mexico City). After independence from Spain (Mexican War of Independence) was achieved, the Federal District (#Federal District) was created in 1824.

After years of demanding greater political autonomy, residents were given the right to directly elect the Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) and the representatives of the unicameral (unicameralism) Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of the Federal District) by popular vote (Election) in 1997. Ever since, the left-wing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) has controlled both of them. Daniel C. Schechter, Josephine Quintero. ''Lonely Planet Mexico City, City Guide With Pullout Map ''. Third Edition. Lonely Planet, 2008. p. 288 (p. 20-21). ISBN 978-1-74059-182-9. In recent years, the local government has passed a wave of liberal policies, such as abortion (Abortion in Mexico) on request, a limited form of euthanasia (Euthanasia in Mexico), no-fault divorce and same-sex marriage (Same-sex marriage in Mexico City).

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