Mexico City

What is Mexico City known for?


deep influence

and current Senator. In 2005 she was nominated by the Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) as the State of México (Mexico (state)) governor candidate (México state election, 2005). She lost to Enrique Peña Nieto of the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party). - Mexico City align center MEX align center MMMX Mexico City International Airport align center - ''Mantra'', a portrait of Mexico City ca. 2000, reveals a deep influence of Science


white keeping

combined. Each of these clubs had a short stay in the Primera Fuerza - an now defunct amateur football league in Mexico City - in the early 1920s but due to the distance, the clubs generally played in the local league which was less competitive. The clubs kept the Veracruz Sporting Club colors which were Red and black which they used in the early part of its existence which a few years later they would switch the black to white keeping the color red as the club's main shirt color

they used in the early part of its existence which a few years later they would switch the black to white keeping the color red as the club's main shirt color. In their first year the club played in Parque Deportivo Veracruzano sharing the field with baseball club Rojos del Águila de Veracruz. The club's nickname was given by Manuel Seyde who had also help merge the two clubs. The club had the honor of having been one of the first clubs to play in the professional league as well as having


amazing+contemporary

DF lat long directions 3 blocks away from JUANACATLAN metro station (Pink Line) phone tollfree fax price Starting at US$65 checkin 13:00 checkout 12:00 content This is a modern concept with amazing contemporary Mexican design, super central only blocks away from Condesa, super nice hosts, Garden, Washing machine, free WIfi,super nice beds and linen. *


metal black

Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


play written

to go beyond the conventional surrealist ideas by embracing absurdism, and its members refused to take themselves seriously, whilst laughing at those critics who did. In 1966 he produced his first comic strip, ''Anibal 5'', which was related to the Panic Movement. The following year he created a new feature film, ''Fando y Lis'', loosely based on a play written by Fernando Arrabal, who was working with Jodorowsky

City to pursue a career in theatre. There, she met Poncho Figueroa, Pablo Valero and Jacobo Lieberman, who at that time were members of a jazz group called "the Psicotrópicos". "The Psicotrópicos" agreed to provide music for a play written for Guerrero's theatre class based on Franz Kafka's "Amérika". As they worked together, they realized they had a strong artistic affinity. After the dissolution of the "Psicotrópicos", they decided to form


international productions

Chinese (People's Republic of China) Edition ''2012 Buenos Aires'' ''2012 Manila'' + Several other International productions in major cities across the world. Buenos Aires has been a candidate city for the Summer Olympic Games on three occasions: for the 1956 Games (1956 Summer Olympics), which were lost by a single vote to Melbourne; for the 1968 Summer Olympics, held in Mexico City; and in 2004 (2004 Summer Olympics), when the games were

like ''La Leyenda de una Mascara'', ''Ave Maria'', and ''Nocturno a Rosario'' and international productions filmed in Mexico. He has work in American films with directors like Tony Scott, Joe Johnston, Stephen Gyllenhaal, ''The Warden of the Red Rock'' starring James Caan (James Caan (actor)), Brian Dennehy and David Carradine, ''The Time of Her Time'' a Norman Mailer story directed by Francis Delia and ''GallowWalker'' with Wesley Snipes, also with John Carpenter in ''Vampires: Los Muertos''. He is currently the director of el Centro de Capacitación Cinematográfica in Mexico City. Peruano beans (also called canary or mayacoba beans) are small, oval, yellow-colored beans about 1 2 inch (1 cm) long with a thin skin. Peruano beans have a creamy texture when cooked, and are one of the top-selling beans in Mexico City since 2005 (being native to Mexico, despite the name). However, yellow beans are uncommon in the United States due to a controversial patent issued in 1999 to John Proctor, who selected and named a strain of yellow bean from seeds he brought back from Mexico. U.S. Patent No. 5,894,079 (the Enola or yellow bean patent (Enola bean)) granted POD-NERS, LLC., exclusive right to import and sell yellow beans in the United States from 1999 through 2008, when the patent was rejected after reexamination. Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


small religious

, Pablo Aramburuzabala, was the Executive Vice President of the Grupo Modelo brewery. On February 26, 2005, she married Tony Garza, United States ambassador to Mexico, in a small religious ceremony in Mexico City. On April 23, they had the civil ceremony near Valle de Bravo, west of Mexico City. U.S. First Lady (First Lady of the United States) Laura Bush attended. An estimated one-third of the guests were from Texas. The couple divorced in May 2010. Aramburuzabala y Garza se divorcian (Spanish) '''The Siege of Puebla''' began the same day Mexico City fell to Winfield Scott and lasted for 28 days when a relief force was able to fight its way into the city and lift the siege. date September 8–15 1847 place Mexico City, D.F. (Mexican Federal District) result Decisive United States victory Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


including painting

) including painting, sculpture and graphic design, one of UNAM's art schools. Many of the works produced by the students and faculty of that time are now displayed in the Museo Nacional de San Carlos (National Museum of San Carlos). One of the students, José María Velasco (José María Velasco Gómez), is considered one of the greatest Mexican landscape painters of the 19th century. Porfirio Díaz's regime sponsored arts, especially those that followed the French school. Popular arts in the form of cartoons and illustrations flourished, e.g. those of José Guadalupe Posada and Manuel Manilla. The permanent collection of the San Carlos Museum also includes paintings by European masters such as Rembrandt, Velázquez, Murillo, and Rubens. After the Mexican Revolution, an avant-garde artistic movement (art movement) originated in Mexico City: muralism. Many of the works of muralists José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera are displayed in numerous buildings in the city, most notably at the National Palace (National Palace (Mexico)) and the Palacio de Bellas Artes. Frida Kahlo, wife of Rivera, with a strong nationalist expression, was also one of the most renowned of Mexican painters. Her house has become a museum that displays many of her works. The former home of Rivera muse Dolores Olmedo houses the namesake museum. The facility is in Xochimilco borough in southern Mexico City and includes several buildings surrounded by sprawling manicured lawns. It houses a large collection of Rivera and Kahlo paintings and drawings, as well as living ''Xoloizcuintles'' (Mexican Hairless Dog). It also regularly hosts small but important temporary exhibits of classical and modern art (e.g. Venetian Masters and Contemporary New York artists). During the 20th century, many artists immigrated to Mexico City from different regions of Mexico, such as Leopoldo Méndez, an engraver from Veracruz, who supported the creation of the socialist Taller de la Gráfica Popular (Popular Graphics Workshop), designed to help blue-collar (Blue-collar worker) workers find a venue to express their art. Other painters came from abroad, such as Catalan (Catalonia) painter Remedios Varo and other Spanish and Jewish exiles. It was in the second half of the 20th century that the artistic movement began to drift apart from the Revolutionary theme. José Luis Cuevas opted for a modernist style in contrast to the muralist movement associated with social politics. Museums thumb Chapultepec Castle (File:Castillo de chapultepcec.jpeg) thumb Reconstruction of the entrance to the Hochob temple in the National Museum of Anthropology (File:Hochob Campeche - Rekonstruktion des Tempels.jpg) thumb Museo Soumaya (File:Ext 06Museo Soumaya FREE Fernando Romero EnterprisE photo by Adam Wiseman.jpg) in the Nuevo Polanco district Mexico City has numerous museums dedicated to art, including Mexican colonial, modern and contemporary art, and international art. The Museo Tamayo was opened in the mid-1980s to house the collection of international contemporary art donated by famed Mexican (born in the state of Oaxaca) painter Rufino Tamayo. The collection includes pieces by Picasso, Klee, Kandinsky, Warhol and many others, though most of the collection is stored while visiting exhibits are shown. The Museo de Arte Moderno (Museum of Modern Art) is a repository of Mexican artists from the 20th century, including Rivera, Orozco, Siqueiros, Kahlo, Gerzso, Carrington, Tamayo, among others, and also regularly hosts temporary exhibits of international modern art. In southern Mexico City, the Museo Carrillo Gil (Carrillo Gil Museum) showcases avant-garde artists, as does the University Museum Contemporary Art (Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo – or MUAC), designed by famed Mexican architect Teodoro González de León, inaugurated in late 2008. The Museo Soumaya, named after the wife of Mexican magnate Carlos Slim, has the largest private collection of original Rodin (Auguste Rodin) sculptures outside Paris. It also has a large collection of Dalí sculptures, and recently began showing pieces in its masters collection including El Greco, Velázquez, Picasso and Canaletto. The museum inaugurated a new futuristic-design facility in 2011 just north of Polanco, while maintaining a smaller facility in Plaza Loreto in southern Mexico City. The Colección Júmex is a contemporary art museum located on the sprawling grounds of the Jumex juice company in the northern industrial suburb of Ecatepec (San Cristóbal Ecatepec). It is said to have the largest private contemporary art collection in Latin America and hosts pieces from its permanent collection as well as traveling exhibits by leading contemporary artists. The new Museo Júmex in Nuevo Polanco was slated to open in November 2013. The Museo de San Ildefonso, housed in the Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso in Mexico City's historic downtown district is a 17th-century colonnaded palace housing an art museum that regularly hosts world-class exhibits of Mexican and international art. Recent exhibits have included those on David LaChapelle, Antony Gormley and Ron Mueck. The National Museum of Art (Museo Nacional de Arte) is also located in a former palace in the historic center. It houses a large collection of pieces by all major Mexican artists of the last 400 years and also hosts visiting exhibits. Jack Kerouac, the noted American author, spent extended periods of time in the city, and wrote his masterpiece volume of poetry ''Mexico City Blues'' here. Another American author, William S. Burroughs, also lived in the Colonia Roma neighborhood of the city for some time. It was here that he accidentally shot his wife. Most of Mexico City's more than 150 museums can be visited from Tuesday to Sunday from 10 am to 5 pm, although some of them have extended schedules, such as the Museum of Anthropology and History, which is open to 7 pm. In addition to this, entrance to most museums is free on Sunday. In some cases a modest fee may be charged. Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


support business

in Mexico City, and Mexico has an embassy in Beirut. * Mexico was a popular destination during the Lebanese diaspora. There is a significant population of Lebanese descent in Mexico, nearing half a million people, many of which travel to and support business with Lebanon. 1980s * On August 31, 1986, Aeroméxico Flight 498, a DC-9 en route from Mexico City, Mexico to Los Angeles, began its descent into LAX when a Piper Cherokee collided with the DC-9's left


support band

; Garbage had just completed a second support slot (support band) on U2's Elevation Tour in Miami, Florida;

Mexico City

imagesize image_caption anthem image_map Distrito Federal en México.svg map_caption México City within Mexico latd 19 latm 26 lats latNS N longd 99 longm 8 longs longEW W coor_pinpoint coordinates_type coordinates_display inline,title coordinates_footnotes coordinates_region MX subdivision_type Country subdivision_name subdivision_type1 Entity (Political divisions of Mexico) subdivision_name1 Federal District (Administrative divisions of Mexico#Federal district) subdivision_type2 Subdivisions subdivision_name2 title Boroughs (Mexico City's boroughs) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none; 1 Álvaro Obregón (Álvaro Obregón, D.F.) 2 Azcapotzalco 3 Benito Juárez (Benito Juárez, D.F.) 4 Coyoacán 5 Cuajimalpa 6 Cuauhtémoc (Cuauhtémoc, D.F.) 7 Gustavo A. Madero (Gustavo A. Madero, D.F.) 8 Iztacalco 9 Iztapalapa 10 Magdalena Contreras 11 Miguel Hidalgo (Miguel Hidalgo, D.F.) 12 Milpa Alta 13 Tláhuac 14 Tlalpan 15 Venustiano Carranza (Venustiano Carranza, D.F.) 16 Xochimilco established_title Founded established_date * March 13, 1325: Mexico-Tenochtitlan * August 13, 1521: Ciudad de México * November 18, 1824: Distrito Federal founder seat_type seat government_footnotes leader_party leader_title Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) leader_name PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 23px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Miguel Ángel Mancera leader_title1 Senators (Senate of Mexico) Senate of Mexico website: LXII & LXIII legislatures, Distrito Federal. Retrieved November 26, 2013 leader_name1 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mario Martín Delgado PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandra Barrales PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Pablo Escudero Morales ul_style margin-bottom:5px; li_style margin-bottom:3px; leader_title2 Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) leader_name2 title Federal Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none;padding-bottom:3px; 1 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Armando Báez Pinal 2 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Marco Antonio García 3 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Cuauhtémoc Gutiérrez 4 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada 5 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Roberto Rebollo 6 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Robles 7 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Claudia Ruiz Massieu 8 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Castilla 9 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Gabriela Cuevas (Gabriela Cuevas Barron) 10 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César González 11 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Paz Gutiérrez 12 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Valdemar Gutiérrez 13 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Kenia López 14 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César Nava 15 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Rosi Orozco 16 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Silvia Pérez Ceballos 17 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Ezequiel Rétiz 18 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Esthela Damián 19 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Luis Felipe Eguía 20 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandro Encinas (Alejandro Encinas Rodríguez) 21 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Guerrero 22 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Francisco Hernández 23 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Héctor Hernández 24 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Teresa Incháustegui 25 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Ramón Jiménez 26 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Vidal Llerenas 27 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Avelino Méndez 28 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Eduardo Mendoza 29 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Nazario Norberto 30 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Quezada 31 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Rigoberto Salgado 32 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Arturo Santana 33 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Emilio Serrano 34 PRD Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mauricio Toledo 35 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Enoé Uranga (Enoé Margarita Uranga Muñoz) 36 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Balfre Vargas 37 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Araceli Vázquez (María Araceli Vázquez Camacho) 38 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Jesús Zambrano 39 Rosario Brindis 40 Pablo Escudero 41 Clara Salinas Sada 42 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Jaime Cárdenas 43 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Itzel Castillo 44 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Mario di Costanzo 45 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Fernández 46 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Ifigenia Martínez 47 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Porfirio Muñoz Ledo 48 Víctor Hugo Círigo 49 Laura Piña Olmedo 50 PNA link New Alliance Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PNA Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Del Mazo 51 María Quiñones unit_pref Metric area_footnotes area_total_km2 1485 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_water_percent area_note Ranked 32nd (List of Mexican states by area) elevation_m 2250 elevation_max_footnotes elevation_max_m 3930 elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft population_footnotes population_total 8,851,080 population_as_of 2010 population_rank 2nd (List of Mexican states by population) population_density_km2 auto population_density_rank 1st (List of Mexican states by population density) population_urban 21.2 million population_demonym population_note timezone1 CST (Central Time Zone) utc_offset1 −6 timezone1_DST CDT (Central Daylight Time) utc_offset1_DST −5 postal_code_type Postal code (Postal codes in Mexico) postal_code 00–16 area_code_type Area code area_code 55 iso_code MX-DFE blank_name_sec1 HDI (Human Development Index) blank_info_sec1 0.8307 '''Very High''' Ranked 1st of 32 (List of Mexican states by HDI) blank_name_sec2 GDP blank_info_sec2 $411.4 billion dollars (American Dollar) website footnotes b. Area of the Federal District (Mexican Federal District) that includes non-urban areas at the south '''Mexico City''' ( It is a federal entity within Mexico which is not part of any one of the 31 Mexican states (States of Mexico) but belongs to the federation as a whole. Mexico City is the country's largest city as well as its most important political, cultural, educational and financial center.

As an "alpha" global city . The city consists of sixteen boroughs (Boroughs of the Mexican Federal District).

The 2009 estimated population for the city proper was around 8.84 million people,

The Greater Mexico City has a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$411 billion in 2011, making Mexico City urban agglomeration (Greater Mexico City) one of the richest metropolitan areas in the world (List of cities by GDP). Global MetroMonitor Brookings Institution. Brookings.edu. Retrieved on April 12, 2014. The city was responsible for generating 15.8% of Mexico's Gross Domestic Product and the metropolitan area accounted for about 22% of total national GDP.

Mexico’s capital is both the oldest capital city in the Americas (List of cities by time of continuous habitation#America, Middle) and one of two founded by Amerindians (Native Americans), the other being Quito. The city was originally built on an island of Lake Texcoco by the Aztecs in 1325 as Tenochtitlan, which was almost completely destroyed in the 1521 siege of Tenochtitlan (Fall of Tenochtitlan), and subsequently redesigned and rebuilt in accordance with the Spanish urban standards (Spanish architecture#Spanish Colonial architecture). In 1524, the municipality (Municipalities of Mexico) of Mexico City was established, known as ''México Tenochtitlán'', and as of 1585 it was officially known as ''Ciudad de México'' (Mexico City). After independence from Spain (Mexican War of Independence) was achieved, the Federal District (#Federal District) was created in 1824.

After years of demanding greater political autonomy, residents were given the right to directly elect the Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) and the representatives of the unicameral (unicameralism) Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of the Federal District) by popular vote (Election) in 1997. Ever since, the left-wing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) has controlled both of them. Daniel C. Schechter, Josephine Quintero. ''Lonely Planet Mexico City, City Guide With Pullout Map ''. Third Edition. Lonely Planet, 2008. p. 288 (p. 20-21). ISBN 978-1-74059-182-9. In recent years, the local government has passed a wave of liberal policies, such as abortion (Abortion in Mexico) on request, a limited form of euthanasia (Euthanasia in Mexico), no-fault divorce and same-sex marriage (Same-sex marriage in Mexico City).

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