Mexico City

What is Mexico City known for?


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the work later in Mexico City in modified form, from photos taken by an assistant, Lucienne Bloch.) Dmoz:Regional North America Mexico States Federal District Commons:Category:Mexico City Wikipedia:Mexico City


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that they anchor, in department stores, big-box stores and in modern shopping malls. Traditional markets left thumb Informal markets are found in public spaces throughout the city (File:CallejonCondesaDF.JPG) thumb Multi-storey Sanborns (File:Sanborns DF.jpg) department store with the façade of a 19th-century home being used as an entrance area File:LitDecorationsWestZocaloGrito2010.JPG thumb left Decorated façade

DF.jpg thumb left Modern multistory Sanborns department store in Mexico City with the facade of a 19th century home being used as an entrance aerea The retail company was founded in Mexico City on June 19, 1903 by California immigrants Walter and Frank Sanborn, who also opened Mexico's first soda fountain. The original location and its lunch counter, across from the main Mexico City post office (''Palacio de Correos'') is still in operation. Biography Born in Bohemia


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Acoustic Folk rock Latin rock Metal rock History The duo met in Mexico City while playing in a thrash metal band called "Tierra Ácida." Growing frustrated with the limited scope of the domestic music scene, they moved to Europe, where they were well received. dissolved location Mexico City, Mexico type Archaeology museum The '''Museo Nacional de Antropología''' ('''MNA''', or ''National Museum


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, Mexico. It was an unusual accomplishment, given that Norteño (Norteño (music)) groups typically play large dance halls and rarely arenas, unless it's an all day festival event. Intocable has also won at least eight of Univision's Premio Lo Nuestro awards, and received their first Grammy win in February 2005 at the 47th Annual Grammys (Grammy Award for Best Mexican Mexican-American Album Album; ''Intimamente'') and second at the 53rd annual Grammys for their album

Classic. Vlady lived and worked in Mexico City until 1990, when he moved to Cuernavaca, where he already had a country house with a giant studio. He died of cancer in Cuernavaca, on July 21st, 2005. '''Pico del Águila''' is a peak of the mountain range called Ajusco, located in Cumbres del Ajusco National Park at the southern outskirts of Mexico City


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. In his 1948 memoirs, NAACP president Walter White (Walter Francis White) said, "He has been variously reported in Mexico, apparently supplied with ample funds, and in other parts of North America." Athens, GA isbn 9780820316987 url http: books.google.com books?id


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telephone firm first James last Bone accessdate June 17, 2011 His father, born Khalil Slim Haddad, immigrated to Mexico at the age of 14 in 1902 and changed his first name to Julián. ref name "Bone"

ilya-salkind-missing-producer-superman-mexico-missing-person title Legendary 'Superman' Producer -- Missing In Mexico last TMZ Staff date 2 February 2011 publisher TMZ (TMZ.com) accessdate 5 March 2011 The 63-year-old was staying at his family's home in Tepoztlán. On February 2, 2011, Salkind's long-time business partner filed a missing persons report (Missing person) with Mexican authorities, Salkind having left his cell phone at his Mexico


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for wrestling his body could not handle the heavy main event schedule that he wrestled as Kahoz and by 1985 he gave up the gimmick to work as ''Espectro de Ultratumba'' ("The Ghost from Beyond the grave"), giving the Kahoz gimmick to Astro Rey instead. Astro Rey's Kahoz was nowhere nearly as important nor as successful as Peña as Astro Rey lacked the charisma and theatrics of the original. Peña only worked as Espectro de Ultratumba for a short period


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of the Mexico City landmark Chapultepec Castle derives from a Nahuatl phrase meaning "Grasshopper Hill". Nearby subway station of the same name (Chapultepec metro station) features a grasshopper in its logo. *A chapulín is the mascot of the Mexico City public theme park La feria de Chapultepec. French troops under Bazaine entered Mexico City on 7 June 1863. The main army entered the city three days later led by General Forey. General Almonte was appointed the provisional


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of the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) and Mexico City crime writer (Crime fiction) Paco Ignacio Taibo II. The novel is written in the so-called "four hands" method in which one author writes a chapter or segment of the novel, handing it over to the other author who writes the next chapter or segment in response. The method has been compared to a game of ping pong between the authors. IDW Publishing Ruination went to work for Starscream, guarding


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in world record breaking time. In 2000 UNESCO proclaimed Ciudad Universitaria de Caracas in Caracas, Venezuela, as a World Heritage Site, describing it as "a masterpiece of modern city planning, architecture and art, created by the Venezuelan architect Carlos Raúl Villanueva and a group of distinguished avant-garde artists". In June 2007 UNESCO proclaimed Ciudad Universitaria of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de

Mexico City

imagesize image_caption anthem image_map Distrito Federal en México.svg map_caption México City within Mexico latd 19 latm 26 lats latNS N longd 99 longm 8 longs longEW W coor_pinpoint coordinates_type coordinates_display inline,title coordinates_footnotes coordinates_region MX subdivision_type Country subdivision_name subdivision_type1 Entity (Political divisions of Mexico) subdivision_name1 Federal District (Administrative divisions of Mexico#Federal district) subdivision_type2 Subdivisions subdivision_name2 title Boroughs (Mexico City's boroughs) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none; 1 Álvaro Obregón (Álvaro Obregón, D.F.) 2 Azcapotzalco 3 Benito Juárez (Benito Juárez, D.F.) 4 Coyoacán 5 Cuajimalpa 6 Cuauhtémoc (Cuauhtémoc, D.F.) 7 Gustavo A. Madero (Gustavo A. Madero, D.F.) 8 Iztacalco 9 Iztapalapa 10 Magdalena Contreras 11 Miguel Hidalgo (Miguel Hidalgo, D.F.) 12 Milpa Alta 13 Tláhuac 14 Tlalpan 15 Venustiano Carranza (Venustiano Carranza, D.F.) 16 Xochimilco established_title Founded established_date * March 13, 1325: Mexico-Tenochtitlan * August 13, 1521: Ciudad de México * November 18, 1824: Distrito Federal founder seat_type seat government_footnotes leader_party leader_title Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) leader_name PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 23px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Miguel Ángel Mancera leader_title1 Senators (Senate of Mexico) Senate of Mexico website: LXII & LXIII legislatures, Distrito Federal. Retrieved November 26, 2013 leader_name1 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mario Martín Delgado PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 15px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandra Barrales PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Pablo Escudero Morales ul_style margin-bottom:5px; li_style margin-bottom:3px; leader_title2 Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) leader_name2 title Federal Deputies (Chamber of Deputies of Mexico) frame_style border:none; padding: 0; title_style list_style text-align:left;display:none;padding-bottom:3px; 1 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Armando Báez Pinal 2 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Marco Antonio García 3 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Cuauhtémoc Gutiérrez 4 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Sebastián Lerdo de Tejada 5 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Roberto Rebollo 6 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Robles 7 PRI link Institutional Revolutionary Party 13px (File:PRI Party (Mexico).svg) Claudia Ruiz Massieu 8 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Castilla 9 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Gabriela Cuevas (Gabriela Cuevas Barron) 10 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César González 11 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Paz Gutiérrez 12 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Valdemar Gutiérrez 13 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Kenia López 14 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) César Nava 15 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Rosi Orozco 16 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Silvia Pérez Ceballos 17 PAN link National Action Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PAN Party (Mexico).svg) Ezequiel Rétiz 18 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Esthela Damián 19 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Luis Felipe Eguía 20 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Alejandro Encinas (Alejandro Encinas Rodríguez) 21 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Agustín Guerrero 22 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Francisco Hernández 23 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Héctor Hernández 24 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Teresa Incháustegui 25 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Ramón Jiménez 26 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Vidal Llerenas 27 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Avelino Méndez 28 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Eduardo Mendoza 29 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Nazario Norberto 30 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Leticia Quezada 31 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Rigoberto Salgado 32 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Arturo Santana 33 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Emilio Serrano 34 PRD Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Mauricio Toledo 35 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Enoé Uranga (Enoé Margarita Uranga Muñoz) 36 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Balfre Vargas 37 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Araceli Vázquez (María Araceli Vázquez Camacho) 38 PRD link Party of the Democratic Revolution 13px (File:PRD Party (Mexico).svg) Jesús Zambrano 39 Rosario Brindis 40 Pablo Escudero 41 Clara Salinas Sada 42 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Jaime Cárdenas 43 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Itzel Castillo 44 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Mario di Costanzo 45 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Fernández 46 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Ifigenia Martínez 47 PT link Labor Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PT Party (Mexico).svg) Porfirio Muñoz Ledo 48 Víctor Hugo Círigo 49 Laura Piña Olmedo 50 PNA link New Alliance Party (Mexico) 13px (File:PNA Party (Mexico).svg) Gerardo Del Mazo 51 María Quiñones unit_pref Metric area_footnotes area_total_km2 1485 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_water_percent area_note Ranked 32nd (List of Mexican states by area) elevation_m 2250 elevation_max_footnotes elevation_max_m 3930 elevation_max_ft elevation_min_m elevation_min_ft population_footnotes population_total 8,851,080 population_as_of 2010 population_rank 2nd (List of Mexican states by population) population_density_km2 auto population_density_rank 1st (List of Mexican states by population density) population_urban 21.2 million population_demonym population_note timezone1 CST (Central Time Zone) utc_offset1 −6 timezone1_DST CDT (Central Daylight Time) utc_offset1_DST −5 postal_code_type Postal code (Postal codes in Mexico) postal_code 00–16 area_code_type Area code area_code 55 iso_code MX-DFE blank_name_sec1 HDI (Human Development Index) blank_info_sec1 0.8307 '''Very High''' Ranked 1st of 32 (List of Mexican states by HDI) blank_name_sec2 GDP blank_info_sec2 $411.4 billion dollars (American Dollar) website footnotes b. Area of the Federal District (Mexican Federal District) that includes non-urban areas at the south '''Mexico City''' ( It is a federal entity within Mexico which is not part of any one of the 31 Mexican states (States of Mexico) but belongs to the federation as a whole. Mexico City is the country's largest city as well as its most important political, cultural, educational and financial center.

As an "alpha" global city . The city consists of sixteen boroughs (Boroughs of the Mexican Federal District).

The 2009 estimated population for the city proper was around 8.84 million people,

The Greater Mexico City has a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$411 billion in 2011, making Mexico City urban agglomeration (Greater Mexico City) one of the richest metropolitan areas in the world (List of cities by GDP). Global MetroMonitor Brookings Institution. Brookings.edu. Retrieved on April 12, 2014. The city was responsible for generating 15.8% of Mexico's Gross Domestic Product and the metropolitan area accounted for about 22% of total national GDP.

Mexico’s capital is both the oldest capital city in the Americas (List of cities by time of continuous habitation#America, Middle) and one of two founded by Amerindians (Native Americans), the other being Quito. The city was originally built on an island of Lake Texcoco by the Aztecs in 1325 as Tenochtitlan, which was almost completely destroyed in the 1521 siege of Tenochtitlan (Fall of Tenochtitlan), and subsequently redesigned and rebuilt in accordance with the Spanish urban standards (Spanish architecture#Spanish Colonial architecture). In 1524, the municipality (Municipalities of Mexico) of Mexico City was established, known as ''México Tenochtitlán'', and as of 1585 it was officially known as ''Ciudad de México'' (Mexico City). After independence from Spain (Mexican War of Independence) was achieved, the Federal District (#Federal District) was created in 1824.

After years of demanding greater political autonomy, residents were given the right to directly elect the Head of Government (Head of Government of the Federal District) and the representatives of the unicameral (unicameralism) Legislative Assembly (Legislative Assembly of the Federal District) by popular vote (Election) in 1997. Ever since, the left-wing Party of the Democratic Revolution (PRD) has controlled both of them. Daniel C. Schechter, Josephine Quintero. ''Lonely Planet Mexico City, City Guide With Pullout Map ''. Third Edition. Lonely Planet, 2008. p. 288 (p. 20-21). ISBN 978-1-74059-182-9. In recent years, the local government has passed a wave of liberal policies, such as abortion (Abortion in Mexico) on request, a limited form of euthanasia (Euthanasia in Mexico), no-fault divorce and same-sex marriage (Same-sex marriage in Mexico City).

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