Mazunte

What is Mazunte known for?


connection speed

? Depends on your preference. Splurge * Connect There are at least two internet cafés in Mazunte. Some restaurants and posadas have wifi. Connection

speed is 1MB so it can get quite slow when congested. Cope There is an ATM in one shop on the main road of Mazunte. If it doesn't deliver, use the ATM in Puerto Angel or an ATM or bank office in Pochutla. Cash is king. Hardly any place accepts credit cards. Go next San Augustinillo is the village and beach next door, a five minute walk. There are colectivo pick ups and taxis to Pochutla for M$10 and to Zipolite for M$5. From Zipolite you can get another colectivo to Puerto Angel. Pochutla market day is a Monday, although you will find fresh fruits and vegetables on any day. WikiPedia:Mazunte Commons:Mazunte


design+knowledge

such as the embassies of Canada, France and England as well as universities such as Stanford (Stanford University), National Polytechnic Institute and National Autonomous University of Mexico, which helped with industrial design, knowledge of local products and cosmetics making.


running water

in a suitcase An Italian in Mazunte To rebuild tourism, annual events such as the Spring Equinox Festival, The International Dance Festival and the Jazz Encounter were founded, which are the largest of their kind in Oaxaca. Since the ban and the change in economy, household income has improved by an average of 17%. Before many residences had no running water, electricity, schools or health centers, which exist now. Now there is universal

running water, three schools and a wider variety in diet. Land prices have risen as well as rents.


amazing views

Yoga center with one room and camping possibilities for people taking at least one daily Yoga class. Great views, roomy kitchen, nice people, daily cleaning, vegetarian kitchen, free movies, etc. *


sports fishing

Mazunte is a stretch of beach with a secluded cove on the far west end. Boats on this beach offer tours to Zipolite, Puerto Ángel, Estacahuite, La Mina and La Boquilla. Depending on the season, it is possible to see whales, dolphins, sea turtles, manta rays and other aquatic species. Rentals for sports fishing are also available. The main beach and the cove on the west end both have a number of small hotels


amazing

place with an amazing view. Cabanas or rooms for 200-250 pesos a night. Quite a hike from everything else but very quiet. Off of the road that leads to Punta Cometa. Look for the blue sign with cursive-like writing. *

Yoga center with one room and camping possibilities for people taking at least one daily Yoga class. Great views, roomy kitchen, nice people, daily cleaning, vegetarian kitchen, free movies, etc. *


community part

mazunte_en.html title Mazunte language Spanish accessdate January 11, 2010 Mazunte has building codes that stipulate that all constructions must blend with already existent structures. The community has strict rules about how, where and what to build in the community. Part of the reason for this is to discourage land speculation and over development. thumb 150px left Building palapa roof with palm fronds (File:BuildPalapaRoofMaz.JPG) Guido Rocco is simply called “the Italian” or “the architect” and is well known and respected for building many of the eco-friendly cabins and other buildings here, which he calls “bio-architecture.” These structures consists mostly of palm fronds, adobe, bamboo, shells stones coconut shells and wood, designed to blend in with the landscape. He arrived in Mazunte in the late 1980s and has remained since. He and his family first arrived in the 1970s as visitors when there were no roads and Mazunte was accessible only by boat. Other Italians have immigrated to Mazunte and other towns along this stretch of coast. Their presence is most easily seen in the Italian restaurants that have been established, some of which offer pizza cooked in a wood-fired oven. '''Cosméticos Naturales de Mazunte''' is a community enterprise dedicated to making high quality make-up that is 100% environmentally friendly. This began a decade ago with the sponsorship of British company The Body Shop, WikiPedia:Mazunte Commons:Mazunte


big band

works and to shop. The cooperative has the slogan of “el milagro de Mazunte” (the miracle of Mazunte). The Mazunte Jazz Festival was begun in 2005 and is held annually. It is one of the largest in Oaxaca state. The 2009 Jazz festival included artists such as Kati Mejía of the U.S., Samuel Piña of Tabasco state, the Adrian Oropeza Trio, the Jazz Oaxaca Big Band as well as Flamenco guitarist David Jenkins.


free movies

Yoga center with one room and camping possibilities for people taking at least one daily Yoga class. Great views, roomy kitchen, nice people, daily cleaning, vegetarian kitchen, free movies, etc. *


people taking

with similar prices. A good bet is to head to the one with the most people taking in the slow pace of life in Mazunte. Particularly recommended are the tlayudas, typical Oaxacan fare that cost M$25-M$50 and are big enough for two people. Also, try an agua fresca M$5-M$10, you may have to wait a while but the combination of watermelon, lemon, and water on a hot day is well worth it. Tacos are in abundance and price M$20-M$30 at most restaurants and less from vendors passing on the beach. If it is just too hard to get off the beach, there are plenty of vendors that come along with homemade tamales and deep fried tacos. If you have a sensitive stomach practice caution in your choices. The boho residents also sell homemade bread and cookies and these treats are highly recommended. * WikiPedia:Mazunte Commons:Mazunte

Mazunte

'''Mazunte''' is a small beach town on the Pacific coast in Oaxaca, Mexico(

Mazunte is famous for sea turtles (marine turtle). Before the mid 20th century, it had nearly no human population, but that changed when a market for sea turtle meat and eggs developed. Due to the many turtles that come to Mazunte to lay eggs, by the 1970s, Mazunte was the center of sea turtle hunting in Mexico, with its own slaughterhouse. Concern over the declining number of sea turtles eventually led to an absolute ban on turtle meat and eggs in Mexico, and deprived most families in Mazunte of their main source of income. To replace it, ecotourism based on the conservation of turtles and natural cosmetics developed. The main attractions of Mazunte today are the Mexican National Turtle Center and the Cosméticos Naturales de Mazunte.

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017