Marshall Space Flight Center

What is Marshall Space Flight Center known for?


major program

almost killed the LST, but the astronomy community – especially Lyman Spitzer – and the National Science Foundation pressed for a major program in this area. Congress finally funded LST in 1978, with an intended launch date of 1983. MSFC was given responsibility for the design, development, and construction of the telescope, while Goddard Space Flight Center (GFC) was to control the scientific instrument and the ground-control center. As the Project Scientist, MSFC brought on board C. Robert O’Dell, then chairman of the Astronomy Department at the University of Chicago. Several different people, at various times, served as the project manager. The telescope assembly was designed as a Cassegrain reflector with hyperbolic mirror polished to be diffraction limited; the primary mirror had a diameter of 2.4 m (95 in). The mirrors were developed by the optics firm, Perkin-Elmer. MSFC did not have a facility to check the ‘end-to-end’ performance of the mirror assembly, so the telescope could not be totally checked until launched and placed in service. Zimmerman, Robert; ''The Universe in a Mirror: The Saga of the Hubble Space Telescope and Visionaries Who Built It''; Princeton Univ. Press, 2008 The LST was named the Hubble Space Telescope in 1983, the original launch date. There were many problems, delays, and cost increases in the program, and the ''Challenger'' disaster delayed the availability of the launch vehicle. Finally, on April 24, 1990, on Mission STS-31, Shuttle ''Discovery'' launched the Hubble telescope successfully into its planned orbit. Almost immediately it was realized that the optical performance was not as expected; analysis of the flawed images showed that the primary mirror had been ground to the wrong shape, resulting in spherical aberration. Fortunately, the Hubble telescope had been designed to allow in-space maintenance, and in December 1993, mission STS-61 carried astronauts to the Hubble to make corrections and change some components. A second repair mission, STS-82, was made in February 1997, and a third, STS-103, in December 1999. For these repair missions, the astronauts practiced the work in MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Facility, simulating the weightless environment of space. Through the 1990s, the Hubble did provide astronomy images that had never before been seen. During the next decade, two additional repair missions were made (March 2002 and in May 2009), eventually bringing the telescope to even better that its initially intended performance. Chandra X-Ray Observatory Even before HEAO-2 (the Einstein Observatory) was launched in 1978, MSFC began preliminary studies for a larger X-ray telescope. To support this effort, in 1976 an X-Ray Test Facility, the only one of its size, was constructed at Marshall for verification testing and calibration of X-ray mirrors, telescope systems, and instruments. With the success of HEAO-2, MSFC was given responsibility for the design, development, and construction of what was then known as the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) partners with MSFC, providing the science and operational management. Work on the AXAF continued through the 1980s. A major review was held in 1992, resulting in many changes; four of the twelve planned mirrors were eliminated, as were two of the six scientific instruments. The planned circular orbit was changed to an elliptical one, reaching one-third of the way to the Moon at its farthest point; this eliminated the possibility of improvement or repair using the Space Shuttle, but it placed the spacecraft above the Earth's radiation belts for most of its orbit. AXAF was renamed Chandra X-ray Observatory in 1998. It was launched July 23, 1999, by the Shuttle ''Columbia'' (STS-93). An Inertial Upper Stage booster adapted by MSFC was used to transport ''Chandra'' to its high orbit Weighing about 22,700 kg (50,000 lb), this was the heaviest payload ever launched by a Shuttle. Operationally managed by the SAO, ‘’Chandra’’ has been returning excellent data since being activated. It initially had an expected life of five years, but this has now been extended to 15 years or longer. "Chandra: Exploring the Invisible Universe" MSFC Compton Gamma Ray Observatory The ''Compton'' Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) is another of NASA's Great Observatories; it was launched April 5, 1991, on Shuttle flight STS-37. At 37,000 lb (17,000 kg), it was the heaviest astrophysical payload ever flown at that time. CGRO was14 years in development by NASA; TRW was the builder. Gamma radiation (rays) is the highest energy-level of electromagnetic radiation, having energies above 100 keV (electronvolt) and thus frequencies above 10 exahertz (hertz) (10 19 Hz). This is produced by sub-atomic (atom) particle interactions, including those in certain astrophysical processes. The continuous flow of cosmic rays bombarding space objects, such as the Moon, generate this radiation Gamma rays also result in bursts from nuclear reactions. The CGRO was designed to image continuous radiation and to detect bursts. MSFC was responsible for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment, (BATSE). This triggered on sudden changes in gamma count-rates lasting 0.1 to 100 s; it was also capable of detecting less impulsive sources by measuring their modulation using the Earth occultation technique. In nine years of operation, BATSE triggered about 8000 events, of which some 2700 were strong bursts that were analyzed to have come from distant galaxies. Unlike the Hubble Space Telescope, the CGRO was not designed for on-orbit repair and refurbishment. Thus, after one of its gyroscopes failed, NASA decided that a controlled crash was preferable to letting the craft come down on its own at random. On June 4, 2000, it was intentionally de-orbited, with the debris that did not burn up falling harmlessly into the Pacific Ocean. At MSFC, Gerald J. Fishman is the principal investigator of a project to continue examination of data from BATSE and other gamma-ray projects. The 2011 Shaw Prize was shared by Fishman and Italian Enrico Costa (Enrico Costa (physicist)) for their gamma-ray research. 1960s and 1970s – the initial decades thumb Rockets developed at MSFC and ABMA before it are on display at MSFC. (File:MSFC rocket park.jpg) Shortly before activating its new Field Center in July 1960, NASA described the MSFC as the only self-contained organization in the nation that was capable of conducting the development of a space vehicle from the conception of the idea, through production of hardware, testing, and launching operations. Initially, engineers from Huntsville traveled to Florida to conduct launch activities at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The first NASA launch facility there (Launch Complex 39 (Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39)) was designed and operated by MSFC, then in on July 1, 1962, the overall site achieving equal status with other NASA centers and was named the Launch Operations Center, later renamed the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Another major NASA facility, the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) located near Houston, Texas, was officially opened in September 1963. Designated the primary center for U.S. space missions and systems involving astronauts, it coordinates and monitors crewed missions through the Mission Control Center. MSC was renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in February 1973. Through the years, there have been a number of ‘turf’ battles between MSFC and MSC JSC concerning mission responsibilities. When the Marshall Space Flight Center began official operations in July 1960, Wernher von Braun was the Director and Eberhard Rees was his Deputy for Research and Development. The administrative activities in MSFC were led by persons with backgrounds in traditional U.S. Government functions, but all of the technical heads were individuals who had assisted von Braun in his success at ABMA. The initial technical activities and leaders at MSFC were as follows: From a NASA-MSFC Organization Chart dated May 25, 1961 When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


location international

NASA year 2007 author NASA After the cancellation of the Habitation Module, Harmony was chosen to house the American Crew Quarters.


large single

at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville in 1962, becoming the first African American employee of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). The last remaining debate was over the nature of the boosters. NASA examined four solutions to this problem: development of the existing Saturn lower stage, simple pressure-fed liquid-fuel engines of a new design, a large single solid rocket, or two (or more) smaller ones. Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (where


single stage

official role in the U.S. space satellite program was delayed, however, after higher authorities elected to use the Vanguard rocket (Vanguard (rocket)) then being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). In February 1956, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) was established; von Braun was the director of the Development Operations Division. One of the primary programs was a When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


nearby white

). For the next five years, von Braun and the German scientists and engineers were primarily engaged in adapting and improving the V-2 missile for U.S. applications; testing was conducted at nearby White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico (White Sands Missile Range). Von Braun had long had a great interest in rocketry for space science and exploration. Toward this, he was allowed to use a WAC Corporal rocket as a second stage for a V-2; the combination, called Bumper, reached a record


largest production

''' was a multistage (multistage rocket) liquid-fuel expendable (expendable launch system) rocket used by NASA's Apollo (Apollo program) and Skylab programs. It was the largest production model of the Saturn family (Saturn rocket) of rockets, although larger models were theorised. The rocket was designed under the direction of Wernher von Braun and Arthur Rudolph at the Marshall Space Flight Center, with the lead contractors being The Boeing Company (Boeing), North American Aviation, Douglas Aircraft Company and IBM. Thirteen Saturn V rockets were launched from 1967 to 1973, with a perfect launch record. (Although Apollo 6 and Apollo 13 did lose engines, the onboard computers were able to compensate.) The main payloads of the rocket were the Apollo spacecraft which carried the NASA astronauts to the Moon. It also launched the Skylab space station. ('''more... (Saturn V)''') thumb right Harmony under assembly. (Image:ISS Node 2 module.jpg) Weighing approximately When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


science projects

to the ISS in February 2009. With this, the full set of solar arrays could be activated, increasing the power available for science projects to 30 kW. That marked the completion of the U.S. "core" of the station. In March 2010, Boeing turned over It is planned that the International Space Station will be operated at least through the end of 2020

, highly successful missions were started in August 1977 (HEAO 1), November 1978 (HEAO 2, also called the Einstein Observatory), and September 1979 (HEAO 3). Fred A. Speer was the HEAO project manager for MSFC. Tucker, Wallace H.; "The Star Splitters: The High Energy Astronomy Observatories" NASA, SP-466, 1984; Other research Other MSFC-managed space science projects in the 1970s included the Laser Geodynamics Satellite (LAGEOS) (LAGEOS) and Gravity Probe A. In LAGEOS, laser beams from 35 ground stations are reflected by 422 prismatic mirrors on the satellite to track movements in the Earth's crust. The measurement accuracy is a few centimeters and it tracks the movement of tectonic plates with comparable accuracy. Conceived and built at MSFC, the LAGEOS was launched by a Delta (Delta (rocket family)) rocket in May 1976. "Laser Tracking Reflector", NASA Tech Data Gravity Probe A, also called the Redshift Experiment, used an extremely precise hydrogen maser clock to confirm part of Einstein's general theory of relativity (general relativity). The probe was launched in June 1976, by a Scout (Scout (rocket family)) rocket, and remained in space for near two hours, as intended. Vessot, R.F.C. et al. (1980). "Test of Relativistic Gravitation with a Space-Borne Hydrogen Maser" ''. Rev. Ltrs.'', vol. 45, no 26 (1980), pp. 2081–2084 Directors When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


designing special

as an engineer, designing special test equipment at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Since then, Rodriguez has held several positions at NASA. Marshall News accessdate 2010-04-26 Dr. Griffin has established the Center for System Studies at the university, which will address the need for 'systems thinking' in industry and the government. System


including size

a month later. Three of these were eliminated after their proposals had been investigated. However it was then decided that the initial specifications for the entire rocket were too small and so it was decided to increase the size of the stages used. This raised difficulties for the four remaining companies as NASA had still not yet decided on various aspects of the stage including size, and the upper stages that would be placed on top. Activities Originally unnamed, the simulator was built at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1977 for use in activities such as checking roadway clearances, crane capabilities and fits within structures. It was later shipped by barge to the Kennedy Space Center and was used for ground crew testing in the Vehicle Assembly Building, Orbiter Processing Facility, and Shuttle Landing Facility. ''Pathfinder'' is approximately the same size, shape and weight of an actual Orbiter. Using ''Pathfinder'' allowed for facilities testing without requiring use of the more delicate and expensive ''Enterprise'' (Space Shuttle Enterprise). Favier was assigned as an alternate payload specialist on STS-65 IML-2, the second International Migrogravity Laboratory mission, and supported the mission as a Crew Interface Coordinator (CIC APS) from the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Experience Upon completing his B.S. degree from Columbia, Massimino worked for IBM as a systems engineer in New York City from 1984 until 1986. In 1986 he entered graduate school at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he conducted research on human operator control of space robotics systems in the MIT Mechanical Engineering Department's Human-machine systems Laboratory. His work resulted in the awarding of two patents. While a student at MIT he worked during the Summer of 1987 as a general engineer at NASA Headquarters in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, during the summers of 1988 and 1989 as a research fellow in the Man-Systems Integration Branch at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and during the summer of 1990 as a visiting research engineer at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany (Oberpfaffenhofen). After graduating from MIT in 1992, Massimino worked at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace in Houston, Texas as a research engineer where he developed laptop computer displays to assist operators of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system. These displays included the Manipulator Position Display, which was evaluated on STS-69. From 1992 to 1995 he was also an adjunct assistant professor in the Mechanical Engineering & Material Sciences Department at Rice University, where he taught feedback control of mechanical systems. In September 1995, Massimino joined the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology as an assistant professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. At Georgia Tech he taught human-machine systems engineering classes and conducted research on human-machine interfaces for space and aircraft systems in the Center for Human-Machine Systems Research, and is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Georgia Tech. He has published papers in technical journals and in the proceedings of technical conferences. In 2011, Massimino co-hosted season three of National Geographic Channel's Known Universe documentary series along with Sigrid Close, Andy Howell, David E. Kaplan, and Steve Jacobs. IMDB - Known Universe (TV Series 2009– ) When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


documentary series

, Massimino co-hosted season three of National Geographic Channel's Known Universe documentary series along with Sigrid Close, Andy Howell, David E. Kaplan, and Steve Jacobs. IMDB - Known Universe (TV Series 2009– ) When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).

Marshall Space Flight Center

The '''George C. Marshall Space Flight Center''' ('''MSFC''') is the U.S. government (Federal government of the United States)'s civilian rocketry and spacecraft propulsion research center. The largest NASA center, MSFC's first mission was developing the Saturn launch vehicles (Saturn (rocket family)) for the Apollo moon program (Apollo program). Marshall has been the agency's lead center for Space Shuttle propulsion and its external tank (Space Shuttle external tank); payloads and related crew training; International Space Station (ISS) design and assembly; and computers, networks, and information management. Located on the Redstone Arsenal near Huntsville, Alabama, MSFC is named in honor of General of the Army (General of the Army (United States)) George Marshall.

The center also contains the '''Huntsville Operations Support Center''' ('''HOSC'''), a facility that supports ISS launch, payload and experiment activities at the Kennedy Space Center. The HOSC also monitors rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station when a Marshall Center payload is on board.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017