Marshall Space Flight Center

What is Marshall Space Flight Center known for?


range+white

). For the next five years, von Braun and the German scientists and engineers were primarily engaged in adapting and improving the V-2 missile for U.S. applications; testing was conducted at nearby White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico (White Sands Missile Range). Von Braun had long had a great interest in rocketry for space science and exploration. Toward this, he was allowed to use a WAC Corporal rocket as a second stage for a V-2; the combination, called Bumper, reached a record

;Nasa report on mission * One (yellow and black) at Missile Park, White Sands Missile Range, White Sands (White Sands, New Mexico), New Mexico. The WSMR (White Sands Missile Range) exhibit is Mittelwerk rocket #FZ04 20919 captured during Special Mission V-2 (Operation Paperclip#Named activities) and is painted with a yellow and black paint scheme of the first successful V-2


national program

. Goldman - (acting) March 6, 2012 to August 3, 2012 *Robin Henderson - August 3, 2012 to September 2012 *Patrick Scheuermann - September 2012 to present * MSFC History and Fact


public based

by the contractor. The defect was found when the telescope was in orbit. The design was such that repairs were possible, and three maintenance missions were flown in Shuttles during the 1990s. Another servicing mission (STS-109) was flown on March 1, 2002. Each mission resulted in considerable improvements, with the images receiving world-wide attention from astronomers as well as the public. Based on the success of earlier maintenance missions, NASA decided to have a fifth service mission to Hubble; this was STS-125 flown on May 11, 2009. The maintenance and additions of equipment resulted in Hubble performance that is considerable better than planned in its origin. It is now expected that the Hubble will remain operational until its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), is available in 2018. http: www.jwst.nasa.gov about.html "Space Shuttle STS125: The Final Visit" When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


including size

a month later. Three of these were eliminated after their proposals had been investigated. However it was then decided that the initial specifications for the entire rocket were too small and so it was decided to increase the size of the stages used. This raised difficulties for the four remaining companies as NASA had still not yet decided on various aspects of the stage including size, and the upper stages that would be placed on top. Activities Originally unnamed, the simulator was built at the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1977 for use in activities such as checking roadway clearances, crane capabilities and fits within structures. It was later shipped by barge to the Kennedy Space Center and was used for ground crew testing in the Vehicle Assembly Building, Orbiter Processing Facility, and Shuttle Landing Facility. ''Pathfinder'' is approximately the same size, shape and weight of an actual Orbiter. Using ''Pathfinder'' allowed for facilities testing without requiring use of the more delicate and expensive ''Enterprise'' (Space Shuttle Enterprise). Favier was assigned as an alternate payload specialist on STS-65 IML-2, the second International Migrogravity Laboratory mission, and supported the mission as a Crew Interface Coordinator (CIC APS) from the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Experience Upon completing his B.S. degree from Columbia, Massimino worked for IBM as a systems engineer in New York City from 1984 until 1986. In 1986 he entered graduate school at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he conducted research on human operator control of space robotics systems in the MIT Mechanical Engineering Department's Human-machine systems Laboratory. His work resulted in the awarding of two patents. While a student at MIT he worked during the Summer of 1987 as a general engineer at NASA Headquarters in the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, during the summers of 1988 and 1989 as a research fellow in the Man-Systems Integration Branch at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and during the summer of 1990 as a visiting research engineer at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany (Oberpfaffenhofen). After graduating from MIT in 1992, Massimino worked at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace in Houston, Texas as a research engineer where he developed laptop computer displays to assist operators of the Space Shuttle remote manipulator system. These displays included the Manipulator Position Display, which was evaluated on STS-69. From 1992 to 1995 he was also an adjunct assistant professor in the Mechanical Engineering & Material Sciences Department at Rice University, where he taught feedback control of mechanical systems. In September 1995, Massimino joined the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology as an assistant professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. At Georgia Tech he taught human-machine systems engineering classes and conducted research on human-machine interfaces for space and aircraft systems in the Center for Human-Machine Systems Research, and is currently an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Georgia Tech. He has published papers in technical journals and in the proceedings of technical conferences. In 2011, Massimino co-hosted season three of National Geographic Channel's Known Universe documentary series along with Sigrid Close, Andy Howell, David E. Kaplan, and Steve Jacobs. IMDB - Known Universe (TV Series 2009– ) When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


carrying multiple

the Kodiak Launch Complex on Kodiak Island, Alaska. FASTSAT is a platform carrying multiple small payloads to low-Earth orbit, creating opportunities to conduct low-cost scientific and technology research on an autonomous satellite in space. FASTSAT, weighing just under 400 pounds (180 kg), serves as a full scientific laboratory containing all the resources needed to carry out scientific and technology research operations. It was developed at the MSFC in partnership with the Von Braun


production site

progressed, external facilities were needed. In 1961, The Michoud Plant near New Orleans, Louisiana, was selected as the Saturn production site. A isolated area in Hancock County, Mississippi was selected to conduct Saturn tests. Known as the Mississippi Test Facility (later renamed the John C. Stennis Space Center), this was primarily to test the vehicles built at the Michoud Plant. Space Shuttle File:Space Shuttle Pathfinder OV-098 original


largest production

''' was a multistage (multistage rocket) liquid-fuel expendable (expendable launch system) rocket used by NASA's Apollo (Apollo program) and Skylab programs. It was the largest production model of the Saturn family (Saturn rocket) of rockets, although larger models were theorised. The rocket was designed under the direction of Wernher von Braun and Arthur Rudolph at the Marshall Space Flight Center, with the lead contractors being The Boeing Company (Boeing), North American Aviation, Douglas Aircraft Company and IBM. Thirteen Saturn V rockets were launched from 1967 to 1973, with a perfect launch record. (Although Apollo 6 and Apollo 13 did lose engines, the onboard computers were able to compensate.) The main payloads of the rocket were the Apollo spacecraft which carried the NASA astronauts to the Moon. It also launched the Skylab space station. ('''more... (Saturn V)''') thumb right Harmony under assembly. (Image:ISS Node 2 module.jpg) Weighing approximately When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


art research

of the 16 ton (14.5 tonne), state-of-the art research laboratory in 1995 at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville (Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama. ''Destiny'' was shipped to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida in 1998, and was turned over to NASA for pre-launch preparations in August 2000. It launched on February 7, 2001 aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis on STS-98. The '''Saturn V''' was a multistage (multistage rocket) liquid-fuel expendable (expendable launch system) rocket used by NASA's Apollo (Apollo program) and Skylab programs. It was the largest production model of the Saturn family (Saturn rocket) of rockets, although larger models were theorised. The rocket was designed under the direction of Wernher von Braun and Arthur Rudolph at the Marshall Space Flight Center, with the lead contractors being The Boeing Company (Boeing), North American Aviation, Douglas Aircraft Company and IBM. Thirteen Saturn V rockets were launched from 1967 to 1973, with a perfect launch record. (Although Apollo 6 and Apollo 13 did lose engines, the onboard computers were able to compensate.) The main payloads of the rocket were the Apollo spacecraft which carried the NASA astronauts to the Moon. It also launched the Skylab space station. ('''more... (Saturn V)''') thumb right Harmony under assembly. (Image:ISS Node 2 module.jpg) Weighing approximately When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


activities making

as a reusable transportation vehicle, and with it came Spacelab and other experimental activities making use of the Shuttle’ cargo bay. These and other projects are described in a later section. But first, MSFC's present capabilities and projects are addressed. Present and future – 2000s onward Marshall Space Flight Center has capabilities and projects supporting NASA's mission in three key areas: lifting from Earth (Space Vehicles), living and working in space (International Space Station), and understanding our world and beyond (Advanced Scientific Research). "Marshall Space Flight Center: About Marshall Missions" Space vehicles MSFC is NASA's designated developer and integrator of launch systems. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Marshall has the engineering capabilities to take space vehicles from initial concept to sustained service. For manufacturing, the world's largest-known welding machine of its type was installed at MSFC in 2008; it is capable of building major, defect-free components for manned-rated space vehicles. In early March 2011, NASA Headquarters announced that MSFC will lead the efforts on a new heavy-lift rocket that, like the Saturn V of the lunar exploration program of the late 1960s, will carry large, man-rated (Human-rating certification) payloads beyond low-Earth orbit. The Center will have the program office for what is being called the Space Launch System (SLS). "SLS program office at Marshall", ''Marshall Star'', March 3, 2011, p. 1 Constellation Program Before it was cancelled by President Barack Obama in early 2010, the Constellation Program had been a major activity in NASA since 2004. In this program, MSFC was responsible for propulsion on the heavy-lift vehicles. These vehicles were designated Ares I and Ares V, and would replace the aging Space Shuttle fleet as well as transport humans to the Moon, Mars, and other deep-space destinations. Connolly, John F.; "Constellation Program Overview", NASA Constellation Program Office, October 2006; . Starting in 2006, the MSFC Exploration Launch Projects Office began work on the Ares projects. On October 28, 2009, an Ares I-X test rocket lifted off from the newly modified Launch Complex 39B (Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for a two-minute powered flight; then continued for four additional minutes traveling When the problem reoccurred, NASA ran a fuel test, which led them to believe the problem lied in the faulty connector. The connector was then removed from the tank and taken to Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) in Huntsville (w:Huntsville, Alabama), Alabama, where it is currently undergoing extensive analysis and modification. The new connector is scheduled to be installed by January 10. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (w:Marshall Space Flight Center) activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, "Just One Drop ... PRICELESS" and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System (w:Life support system) operates as used on the International Space Staton (w:International Space Station) (ISS).


main place

Flight Center (MSFC). The main place of manufacture was the Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans. Wind tunnel testing took place in Seattle and the machining of the tools needed to build the stages at Wichita (Wichita, Kansas), Kansas. In 1961 the Marshall Space Flight Center began the process to find the contractor to build the stage. Out of the 30 aerospace companies invited to a conference where the initial requirements were laid out, only seven submitted proposals

Marshall Space Flight Center

The '''George C. Marshall Space Flight Center''' ('''MSFC''') is the U.S. government (Federal government of the United States)'s civilian rocketry and spacecraft propulsion research center. The largest NASA center, MSFC's first mission was developing the Saturn launch vehicles (Saturn (rocket family)) for the Apollo moon program (Apollo program). Marshall has been the agency's lead center for Space Shuttle propulsion and its external tank (Space Shuttle external tank); payloads and related crew training; International Space Station (ISS) design and assembly; and computers, networks, and information management. Located on the Redstone Arsenal near Huntsville, Alabama, MSFC is named in honor of General of the Army (General of the Army (United States)) George Marshall.

The center also contains the '''Huntsville Operations Support Center''' ('''HOSC'''), a facility that supports ISS launch, payload and experiment activities at the Kennedy Space Center. The HOSC also monitors rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station when a Marshall Center payload is on board.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017