Marrakesh

What is Marrakesh known for?


small arts

, is noted for its dark Berber carpets and rugs. Ensemble Artisanal is a government-run complex of small

arts and crafts which offers a range of leather goods, textiles and carpets. Young apprentices are taught a range of crafts in the workshop at the back of this complex. around the medina of the city, were built by the Almoravids in the 12th century as protective fortifications. The walls are made of a distinct


original stone

and stands by joint Spanish and French forces, did the territory finally become subdued. Another uprising in 1956 - 1958 (Ifni War), initiated by the Moroccan Army of Liberation, led to heavy fighting, but eventually the Spanish forces regained control, again with French aid. However, unrest simmered, and in 1967 the Harakat Tahrir arose to challenge Spanish rule peacefully. After the events of the Zemla Intifada in 1970, when Spanish police destroyed the organization and "disappeared (forced disappearance)" its founder, Muhammad Bassiri, Sahrawi nationalism again took a militant turn. Opponents of this viewpoint, including some Mizrahi Jews themselves, see this as one-sided at best. They point to the persecutions of the Jews of North Africa in the 12th century under the Almohades, the slaughter of thousands of Jews in Fez (Fez, Morocco) in 1465 (after the Jewish deputy vizier Harun (Aaron), who had imposed heavy taxes on the population on behalf of the vizier, was accused of treating a Muslim woman "offensively"), and to similar massacres in Libya , Algiers, and Marrakesh in the 18th and 19th centuries (Morris, 2001). They also point to waves of synagogue destructions and forced conversions throughout the Arab world from the 11th to 19th centuries, and to the fact that, by the 19th century, most Jews of North Africa were forced to live in ''mellahs'' or ghettos, and were subject to a number of restrictions and humiliations, as they were in Europe.


massive range

-8327-9233-6 page 274 It also has two large cinema complexes, Le Colisée à Gueliz and Cinéma Rif, and a new shopping precinct, Al Mazar. 250px thumb left Gueliz district in Marrakech (File:Gueliz Marrakech (2844894943).jpg) Trade and crafts are extremely important to the local tourism-fueled economy. There are 18 ''souks'' in Marrakesh, employing over 40,000 people in pottery, copperware, leather and other crafts. The ''souks'' contain a massive range of items from plastic sandals


world water

United Nations and in March 1997 Marrakesh served as the site of the World Water Council's first World Water Forum, which was attended by over 500 international participants. In the 21st century, property and real estate development in the city has boomed, with a dramatic increase in new hotels and shopping centres, fuelled by the policies of Mohammed VI of Morocco, who aims to increase the number of tourists annually visiting Morocco


comedy+opera

The Théâtre Royal de Marrakesh, the Institut Français (Institut Français (Marrakesh)) and Dar Chérifa are major performing arts institutions in the city. The Théâtre Royal, built by Tunisian architect Charles Boccara, puts on theatrical performances of comedy, opera, and dance in French and Arabic. A greater number of theatrical troupes perform outdoors and entertain tourists on the main square and the streets, especially at night. Christopher Hudson


early attempt

by joint Spanish and French forces, did the territory finally become subdued. Another uprising in 1956 - 1958 (Ifni War), initiated by the Moroccan Army of Liberation, led to heavy fighting, but eventually the Spanish forces regained control, again with French aid. However, unrest simmered, and in 1967 the Harakat Tahrir arose to challenge Spanish rule peacefully. After the events of the Zemla Intifada in 1970, when Spanish police destroyed the organization and "disappeared (forced disappearance)" its founder, Muhammad Bassiri, Sahrawi nationalism again took a militant turn. Opponents of this viewpoint, including some Mizrahi Jews themselves, see this as one-sided at best. They point to the persecutions of the Jews of North Africa in the 12th century under the Almohades, the slaughter of thousands of Jews in Fez (Fez, Morocco) in 1465 (after the Jewish deputy vizier Harun (Aaron), who had imposed heavy taxes on the population on behalf of the vizier, was accused of treating a Muslim woman "offensively"), and to similar massacres in Libya , Algiers, and Marrakesh in the 18th and 19th centuries (Morris, 2001). They also point to waves of synagogue destructions and forced conversions throughout the Arab world from the 11th to 19th centuries, and to the fact that, by the 19th century, most Jews of North Africa were forced to live in ''mellahs'' or ghettos, and were subject to a number of restrictions and humiliations, as they were in Europe.


attitude quot

that he had been asked to leave the band for reasons connected with his "attitude". Coxon stated that "there were no rows" and " the band just recognised the feeling that we needed some time apart". ref


quot attitude

that he had been asked to leave the band for reasons connected with his "attitude". Coxon stated that "there were no rows" and " the band just recognised the feeling that we needed some time apart". ref


main title

; Additional notes Recorded at Marrakesh, Morocco; Bron-Yr-Aur, Wales; London, England. * Catalogue: Atlantic 82706-2-4-1 (US) In the south, a new dynasty arose: the Saadians who seized Marrakesh in 1524 and made it their capital. By 1537 the Saadians were in the ascendent when they defeated the Portuguese at Agadir. Their military successes contrast with the Wattasid policy of conciliation towards the Catholic kings to the north. Miscellanea The main title of the album ''Kutché'' is the adaptation of a popular Moroccan (Morocco) song "mul al Kutché", meaning "owner of the ''Kutché''", which is a kind of barouche used to transport people in some Moroccan towns (mainly tourists nowadays) like Marrakesh or Meknes, it originates from the Spanish (Spanish language) ''coche'',this album sold 1 million copies. Yusuf II died suddenly in early 1224 - accidentally gored while playing with his pet cows. Lacking heirs, the palace bureaucrats, led by Ibn Jam'i, quickly engineered the election of his elderly grand-uncle as the next caliph Abd al-Wahid I (Abdul-Wahid I, Almohad Caliph), as the new caliph in Marrakesh. But the hastiness and probable unconstitutionality of the Marrakesh proceedings upset his uncles, the brothers of al-Nasir, in al-Andalus. They promptly disputed the succession, and elected their own Caliph Abdallah al-Adil. It was the first such challenge to an Almohad succession. And it would set in motion a series of intercine Almohad struggles which would lead to the loss of al-Andalus and the eventual collapse of the Almohad state. Abd al-Wahid was back in Marrakesh in February 1224, when his grand-nephew, the young Almohad caliph Yusuf II (Yusuf II, Almohad Caliph), was accidentally killed, leaving no heirs. The palace vizier Abu Sa`id Uthman ibn Jam`i quickly drated the elderly Abd al-Wahid, then in his sixties, and presented him before the Almohad sheikhs of Marrakesh, who promptly elected him as the new Almohad Caliph. However, the hastiness of the election and the probable unconstitutionality of these proceedings, was disputed by his other nephews, the brothers of al-Nasir, who governed in al-Andalus. Like other leading Almohad family nobles, the brothers had probably hoped for a less-experienced and more pliable candidate, likelier to give them freer rein to carry on autonomously in the provinces, as they had enjoyed during the caliphate of Yusuf II. The succession stunt unbalanced the careful coalition that had been built up over decades, setting different branches of the Almohad family member against each other, and against the palace bureaucrats and the tribal sheikhs. Muhammad Bassiri was born to Sahrawi family in Tan-Tan Biografía de Mohamed Basiri by joint Spanish and French forces, did the territory finally become subdued. Another uprising in 1956 - 1958 (Ifni War), initiated by the Moroccan Army of Liberation, led to heavy fighting, but eventually the Spanish forces regained control, again with French aid. However, unrest simmered, and in 1967 the Harakat Tahrir arose to challenge Spanish rule peacefully. After the events of the Zemla Intifada in 1970, when Spanish police destroyed the organization and "disappeared (forced disappearance)" its founder, Muhammad Bassiri, Sahrawi nationalism again took a militant turn. Opponents of this viewpoint, including some Mizrahi Jews themselves, see this as one-sided at best. They point to the persecutions of the Jews of North Africa in the 12th century under the Almohades, the slaughter of thousands of Jews in Fez (Fez, Morocco) in 1465 (after the Jewish deputy vizier Harun (Aaron), who had imposed heavy taxes on the population on behalf of the vizier, was accused of treating a Muslim woman "offensively"), and to similar massacres in Libya , Algiers, and Marrakesh in the 18th and 19th centuries (Morris, 2001). They also point to waves of synagogue destructions and forced conversions throughout the Arab world from the 11th to 19th centuries, and to the fact that, by the 19th century, most Jews of North Africa were forced to live in ''mellahs'' or ghettos, and were subject to a number of restrictions and humiliations, as they were in Europe.


unique concept

. According to other sources, the city was known as the Berbers designations such as "Gaynou" Lagrare, and   it was founded by the Almoravids like a project to monitor the road between Fes (Fes, Morocco) and Marrakesh, to populate the area and fight against Berghouata’s heresy. Nevertheless, some manuscripts cite evidence that Saadian Dynasty founded the city in the late of sixteenth century and it was known as designation "Kelaat Lagrare". This unique concept

Marrakesh

'''Marrakesh''' or '''Marrakech''' ( ; accessdate 24 September 2014 publisher Collins Dictionary date n.d. northeast of Agadir.

Marrakesh is possibly the most important of Morocco's four former (History of Morocco) imperial cities (Imperial cities of Morocco) (cities that were built by Moroccan Berber empires). The region was inhabited by Berber (Berber people) farmers from Neolithic times, but the actual city was founded in 1062 AD by Abu Bakr ibn Umar, chieftain and cousin of Almoravid (Almoravid dynasty) king Yusuf ibn Tashfin. In the 12th century, the Almoravids built many madrasas (Koranic schools) and mosques in Marrakesh that bear Andalusian influences. The red walls of the city, built by Ali ibn Yusuf in 1122-1123, and various buildings constructed in red sandstone during this period, have given the city the nickname of the "Red City" or "Ochre City". Marrakesh grew rapidly and established itself as a cultural, religious, and trading centre for the Maghreb and sub-Saharan Africa; Jemaa el-Fnaa is the busiest square in Africa.

After a period of decline, the city was surpassed by Fes, but in the early 16th century, Marrakesh again became the capital of the kingdom. The city regained its preeminence under wealthy Saadian (Saadian dynasty) sultans Abu Abdallah al-Qaim and Ahmad al-Mansur, who embellished the city with sumptuous palaces such as the El Badi Palace (1578) and restored many ruined monuments. Beginning in the 17th century, the city became popular among Sufi (sufism) pilgrims for Morocco's seven patron saints, who are entombed here. In 1912 the French Protectorate in Morocco was established and T'hami El Glaoui became Pasha of Marrakesh and held this position nearly throughout the duration of the protectorate until the role was dissolved upon independence of Morocco and the reestablishment of the monarchy in 1956. In 2009, Marrakesh mayor Fatima Zahra Mansouri became the second woman to be elected mayor in Morocco.

Like many Moroccan cities, Marrakesh comprises an old fortified city packed with vendors and their stalls (the ''medina'' (medina quarter)), bordered by modern neighborhoods, the most prominent of which is ''Gueliz''. Today it is one of the busiest cities in Africa and serves as a major economic centre and tourist destination. Tourism is strongly advocated by the reigning Moroccan monarch, Mohammed VI (Mohammed VI of Morocco), with the goal of doubling the number of tourists visiting Morocco to 20 million by 2020. Despite the economic recession, real estate and hotel development in Marrakesh has grown dramatically in the 21st century. Marrakesh is particularly popular with the French, and numerous French celebrities own property in the city. Marrakesh has the largest traditional Berber market (''souk'') in Morocco, with some 18 ''souks'' selling wares ranging from traditional Berber carpets to modern consumer electronics. Crafts employ a significant percentage of the population, who primarily sell their products to tourists.

Marrakesh is served by Ménara International Airport (Menara International Airport) and the Marrakesh railway station, which connects the city to Casablanca and northern Morocco. Marrakesh has several universities and schools, including Cadi Ayyad University. A number of Moroccan football clubs are located here, including Najm de Marrakech, KAC Marrakech, Mouloudia de Marrakech and Chez Ali Club de Marrakech. The Marrakesh Street Circuit hosts the World Touring Car Championship, Auto GP World Series and FIA Formula Two Championship races.

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