Malinalco

What is Malinalco known for?


contemporary arts

The '''Casa de Cultura or Cultural Center''' is located in the center of town in front of the Municipal Palace. It is decorated with replicas of the murals found at the archeological zone and old photographs of native cultures. It also hosts dances, expositions and other cultural events. The '''Tlakuikani Gallery''' hosts expositions of contemporary arts done by artists from Malinalco and other parts of the State of Mexico. This gallery is located in the Barrio de Santa Maria Norte and specializes in the exposition and sale of oil paintings and wood carvings. thumb Chapel of San Pedro (File:Capilla de San Pedro Siglo XVI Malinalco.jpg) Outside of the center of town, there are many small barrios or neighborhoods, each having its own chapel. Most of these chapels were built between the 16th and the 17th centuries and many of these, such as those of '''Santa Maria''', '''San Martin''', '''San Guillermo''', '''San Pedro''', '''San Andres''' and '''La Soledad''' are considered to be works of art. For example, the chapel of San Juan has reliefs of Augustinian monks and the head of the encomendero of Malinalco, Cristobàl Romero. All of the chapels in the town face west with the exception of the Chapel of Santa Mónica. This one is dedicated to the mother of the founder of the order and faces the convent. Each one is unique in some way, and each has its own feast day. Most of these are located south of the town center following Benito Juarez Street out of town. Chapels here include those of Santa María, San Martín, San Guillermo, San Pedro, San Andrés and the Virgin of Soledad. One to the north is the Chapel of San Juan, which has reliefs of Augustine friar Cristobal Romero. To the west is the Chapel of Santa Mónica, which has been quite altered in the last two centuries. At la '''Casa Mia''', handcrafts, particularly alebrijes are for sale. The municipality As municipal seat, the town of Malinalco is the governing authority over 54 other named communities, where the Aztecs built a garrison to keep the rebellious Chontal (Tequistlatecan)es in line, in Quauhquechollan (modern day Huauquechula) near Atlixco where the Aztecs built a garrison in order to always have forces close to their traditional enemies the Tlaxcalteca (Tlaxcala (Nahua state)), Chololteca (Cholula) and Huexotzinca, and in Malinalco near Toluca. The latter is where Ahuitzotl built garrisons and fortifications to keep watch over the Matlatzinca, Mazahua and Otomi (Otomi people)es and to always have troops close to the enemy Tarascan state - the borders with which were also guarded and at least partly fortified on both sides. The area was first settled between 1800 an 1300 BC with remains found around the hills of Nixcongo, Exhacienda de Monte de Pozo and Tepoxtepec showing Olmec influence. During the Pre-classic and Classic periods (Mesoamerica) the area was dominated by the Tarascan. During the Aztec invasion of the area, the Tenancingo chief Tezozomoctli, collaborated with Axayacatl to subdue the rival chief Chicaquiauh of Malinalco and to conquer Calpulli de Coapipitzoatepec (Xochiaca). In return, he remained an independent chieftain within the Aztec Empire. In 1535, after the Conquest, the area was given to Juan Salcedo. In 1537, the Augustinians evangelized the area and built a hermitage here. The modern town of Tenancingo was founded by the Spanish in 1551 near the older native settlements at the base of the Hill of Las Tres Marías (The Three Marias). In 1771, the Carmelites built a monastery here. In 1861, the village gained town status, and in1878, Tenancingo was recognized as a city. Malinalco, Valle, Tlalpujahua, Xonotla, Otumba, Aculco de Espinoza, Lerma, Tonatico, Luvianos, Tarimoro, Guanajuato, Tambopata - Candamo, Donato Guerra, Angangeo, Huixquilucan, Tlatlaya, Jiquipilco, Juchitepec


activities including

that these families depend on multiple economic activities, including temporary migration to nearby cities or the United States.


natural water

. During the colonial period, a communal water supply system was developed, taking advantage of the natural water flows in the box canyon that surrounds the town. where the Aztecs built a garrison to keep the rebellious Chontal (Tequistlatecan)es in line, in Quauhquechollan (modern day Huauquechula) near Atlixco where the Aztecs built a garrison in order to always have forces close to their traditional enemies the Tlaxcalteca (Tlaxcala (Nahua state)), Chololteca (Cholula) and Huexotzinca, and in Malinalco near Toluca. The latter is where Ahuitzotl built garrisons and fortifications to keep watch over the Matlatzinca, Mazahua and Otomi (Otomi people)es and to always have troops close to the enemy Tarascan state - the borders with which were also guarded and at least partly fortified on both sides. The area was first settled between 1800 an 1300 BC with remains found around the hills of Nixcongo, Exhacienda de Monte de Pozo and Tepoxtepec showing Olmec influence. During the Pre-classic and Classic periods (Mesoamerica) the area was dominated by the Tarascan. During the Aztec invasion of the area, the Tenancingo chief Tezozomoctli, collaborated with Axayacatl to subdue the rival chief Chicaquiauh of Malinalco and to conquer Calpulli de Coapipitzoatepec (Xochiaca). In return, he remained an independent chieftain within the Aztec Empire. In 1535, after the Conquest, the area was given to Juan Salcedo. In 1537, the Augustinians evangelized the area and built a hermitage here. The modern town of Tenancingo was founded by the Spanish in 1551 near the older native settlements at the base of the Hill of Las Tres Marías (The Three Marias). In 1771, the Carmelites built a monastery here. In 1861, the village gained town status, and in1878, Tenancingo was recognized as a city. Malinalco, Valle, Tlalpujahua, Xonotla, Otumba, Aculco de Espinoza, Lerma, Tonatico, Luvianos, Tarimoro, Guanajuato, Tambopata - Candamo, Donato Guerra, Angangeo, Huixquilucan, Tlatlaya, Jiquipilco, Juchitepec


title+landscapes

: Malinalco: A Place between Heaven and Earth editor Christie, Jessica Joyce title Landscapes of Origin in the Americas: Creation Narratives Linking Ancient Places and Present Communities publisher University of Alabama Press location Tuscaloosa, Alabama pages 57–76 isbn 978-0-8173-1673-0 The name Malinalco comes from the Nahuatl word ''malinalli'', which is a kind of grass (Poaceae) called ''zacate del


bright green

a number of fresh-water springs such as the San Miguel, Ateopa and Cuatzonco, most of which are the source of potable water for the communities of the municipality. The climate here is warm but not hot with rains mostly in the summer. The landscape is bright green in the summer and a golden color in the winter. Average temperatures vary between 20C in the higher elevations to 35C in the lower ones. The higher elevations mostly have mixed pine forests, with more tropical vegetation in the lowlands. Wildlife includes deer, various small mammals, a number of reptile species and birds. The San Miguel River is part of the Chalma-Malinalco sub-basin. It is an intermittent river and crosses the entire municipality, including the town itself. It has been used to dump trash so that the river produces disease, fetid odors and environmental damage. This has discouraged tourism to the town, and prevented the town from becoming a “Pueblo Mágico.” where the Aztecs built a garrison to keep the rebellious Chontal (Tequistlatecan)es in line, in Quauhquechollan (modern day Huauquechula) near Atlixco where the Aztecs built a garrison in order to always have forces close to their traditional enemies the Tlaxcalteca (Tlaxcala (Nahua state)), Chololteca (Cholula) and Huexotzinca, and in Malinalco near Toluca. The latter is where Ahuitzotl built garrisons and fortifications to keep watch over the Matlatzinca, Mazahua and Otomi (Otomi people)es and to always have troops close to the enemy Tarascan state - the borders with which were also guarded and at least partly fortified on both sides. The area was first settled between 1800 an 1300 BC with remains found around the hills of Nixcongo, Exhacienda de Monte de Pozo and Tepoxtepec showing Olmec influence. During the Pre-classic and Classic periods (Mesoamerica) the area was dominated by the Tarascan. During the Aztec invasion of the area, the Tenancingo chief Tezozomoctli, collaborated with Axayacatl to subdue the rival chief Chicaquiauh of Malinalco and to conquer Calpulli de Coapipitzoatepec (Xochiaca). In return, he remained an independent chieftain within the Aztec Empire. In 1535, after the Conquest, the area was given to Juan Salcedo. In 1537, the Augustinians evangelized the area and built a hermitage here. The modern town of Tenancingo was founded by the Spanish in 1551 near the older native settlements at the base of the Hill of Las Tres Marías (The Three Marias). In 1771, the Carmelites built a monastery here. In 1861, the village gained town status, and in1878, Tenancingo was recognized as a city. Malinalco, Valle, Tlalpujahua, Xonotla, Otumba, Aculco de Espinoza, Lerma, Tonatico, Luvianos, Tarimoro, Guanajuato, Tambopata - Candamo, Donato Guerra, Angangeo, Huixquilucan, Tlatlaya, Jiquipilco, Juchitepec


oil paintings

in the Barrio de Santa Maria Norte and specializes in the exposition and sale of oil paintings and wood carvings. thumb Chapel of San Pedro (File:Capilla de San Pedro Siglo XVI Malinalco.jpg) Outside of the center of town, there are many small barrios or neighborhoods, each having its own chapel. Most of these chapels were built between the 16th and the 17th centuries and many of these, such as those of '''Santa Maria''', '''San Martin''', '''San Guillermo


main building

"A-G-64" where the Aztecs built a garrison to keep the rebellious Chontal (Tequistlatecan)es in line, in Quauhquechollan (modern day Huauquechula) near Atlixco where the Aztecs built a garrison in order to always have forces close to their traditional enemies the Tlaxcalteca (Tlaxcala (Nahua state)), Chololteca (Cholula) and Huexotzinca, and in Malinalco near Toluca. The latter is where Ahuitzotl built garrisons and fortifications to keep watch over the Matlatzinca, Mazahua and Otomi (Otomi people)es and to always have troops close to the enemy Tarascan state - the borders with which were also guarded and at least partly fortified on both sides. The area was first settled between 1800 an 1300 BC with remains found around the hills of Nixcongo, Exhacienda de Monte de Pozo and Tepoxtepec showing Olmec influence. During the Pre-classic and Classic periods (Mesoamerica) the area was dominated by the Tarascan. During the Aztec invasion of the area, the Tenancingo chief Tezozomoctli, collaborated with Axayacatl to subdue the rival chief Chicaquiauh of Malinalco and to conquer Calpulli de Coapipitzoatepec (Xochiaca). In return, he remained an independent chieftain within the Aztec Empire. In 1535, after the Conquest, the area was given to Juan Salcedo. In 1537, the Augustinians evangelized the area and built a hermitage here. The modern town of Tenancingo was founded by the Spanish in 1551 near the older native settlements at the base of the Hill of Las Tres Marías (The Three Marias). In 1771, the Carmelites built a monastery here. In 1861, the village gained town status, and in1878, Tenancingo was recognized as a city. Malinalco, Valle, Tlalpujahua, Xonotla, Otumba, Aculco de Espinoza, Lerma, Tonatico, Luvianos, Tarimoro, Guanajuato, Tambopata - Candamo, Donato Guerra, Angangeo, Huixquilucan, Tlatlaya, Jiquipilco, Juchitepec


large wooden

in which to put the hearts of sacrifice victims, who then turn into messengers of the sun. The orientation of the building relates to the movement of the stars. Before it was covered with a thatched roof to preserve it, openings in the walls provoked light phenomena at certain times such as at the summer solstice. From here was found a large wooden huéhuetl or ceremonial war drum, which is now in the Museum of Anthropology and History in the Mexiquense Cultural Center in Toluca. At the spring and fall equinoxes some 5,000 to 7,000 people visit the site. where the Aztecs built a garrison to keep the rebellious Chontal (Tequistlatecan)es in line, in Quauhquechollan (modern day Huauquechula) near Atlixco where the Aztecs built a garrison in order to always have forces close to their traditional enemies the Tlaxcalteca (Tlaxcala (Nahua state)), Chololteca (Cholula) and Huexotzinca, and in Malinalco near Toluca. The latter is where Ahuitzotl built garrisons and fortifications to keep watch over the Matlatzinca, Mazahua and Otomi (Otomi people)es and to always have troops close to the enemy Tarascan state - the borders with which were also guarded and at least partly fortified on both sides. The area was first settled between 1800 an 1300 BC with remains found around the hills of Nixcongo, Exhacienda de Monte de Pozo and Tepoxtepec showing Olmec influence. During the Pre-classic and Classic periods (Mesoamerica) the area was dominated by the Tarascan. During the Aztec invasion of the area, the Tenancingo chief Tezozomoctli, collaborated with Axayacatl to subdue the rival chief Chicaquiauh of Malinalco and to conquer Calpulli de Coapipitzoatepec (Xochiaca). In return, he remained an independent chieftain within the Aztec Empire. In 1535, after the Conquest, the area was given to Juan Salcedo. In 1537, the Augustinians evangelized the area and built a hermitage here. The modern town of Tenancingo was founded by the Spanish in 1551 near the older native settlements at the base of the Hill of Las Tres Marías (The Three Marias). In 1771, the Carmelites built a monastery here. In 1861, the village gained town status, and in1878, Tenancingo was recognized as a city. Malinalco, Valle, Tlalpujahua, Xonotla, Otumba, Aculco de Espinoza, Lerma, Tonatico, Luvianos, Tarimoro, Guanajuato, Tambopata - Candamo, Donato Guerra, Angangeo, Huixquilucan, Tlatlaya, Jiquipilco, Juchitepec


traditional food

under banana trees. A traditional drink to have with the meal is pineapple juice prepared with tequila, vodka or mezcal. Market day is Wednesday, when vendors come into town from the outlying villages to sell. This market sells regional produce, traditional food and wood crafted in different forms such as animals and musical instruments. ref name "cdtravel" >


bright

Carranza both claimed this area. During the regime of Victoriano Huerta, Malinalco stayed loyal to the Zapatistas, despite government efforts to eradicate the rebels. The town Malinalco is set in a semi-enclosed valley, surrounded by cliffs. The houses are mostly made of adobe with red tile roofs, some of which are painted bright colors. ref name "saenz" >

a number of fresh-water springs such as the San Miguel, Ateopa and Cuatzonco, most of which are the source of potable water for the communities of the municipality. The climate here is warm but not hot with rains mostly in the summer. The landscape is bright green in the summer and a golden color in the winter. Average temperatures vary between 20C in the higher elevations to 35C in the lower ones. The higher elevations mostly have

Malinalco

'''Malinalco''' is a town and municipality located 65 kilometers south of the city of Toluca in the south of the western portion of the State of Mexico.

Malinalco has always been associated with magic or sorcery due to the legend that it was the home the goddess Malinalxóchil.

The Aztecs conquered the area in the 1470s, and established here a sanctuary for their military elite, the Eagle (Eagle warrior) and Jaguar warriors. The complex was built on the Cerro de los Idolos (Hill of the Idols), over an older ceremonial site. The main attraction of this archeological site is the Cuauhcalli or House of Eagles, which is a building carved out of the side of the mountain.

The name Malinalco comes from the Nahuatl word ''malinalli'', which is a kind of grass (Poaceae) called ''zacate del carbonero'' in Spanish, the word ''xóchitl'', which means flower and ''co'', which means place, which a translation of “where they worship the goddess Malinalxóchitl, the malinalli flower”. The name also refers to one of the time periods on the Aztec calendar, marked by the malinalli plant, according to the Quauhtinchan Annals. In Aztec and early colonial times, the area was represented by a number of glyphs, often with elements of the malinalli plant and or a human skull to indicate sacrifice.

Unlike most other municipalities in the state of Mexico, Malinalco does not use an Aztec glyph or coat of arms. Instead, it has a logo that was designed by Ernesto Romero Tetazin in 1985. It consists of the seal of the nation of Mexico (coat of arms of Mexico), from which rises a figure that simulates a low mountain under a malinalli flower. This includes the motto “Your archeology is the perseverance of our race, culture and work” (''Tu arqueología constancia de nuestra raza cultura y trabajo''). To the left is the word Malinaltepetl.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017