Mahabad

What is Mahabad known for?


involvement

, six weeks of riots and protests erupted in Kurdish towns and villages throughout eastern Kurdistan. Scores were killed and injured, and an untold number arrested without charge. The Iranian authorities have also shut down several major Kurdish newspapers and arrested editors and reporters. Among those was Roya Toloui, a Women's rights activist and head of the ''Rasan'' ("Rising") newspaper in Sanandaj, who was alleged to be tortured for two months for involvement

, a Women's rights activist and head of the ''Rasan'' ("Rising") newspaper in Sanandaj, who was alleged to be tortured for two months for involvement in the organization of peaceful protests throughout Kurdistan province. Amnesty International According to the one of Iran analyst's of International Crisis Group (a NGO founded in 1995 by World Bank Vice-President and former US


religious training

going through the elementary school of Saadat in Mahabad and completing his religious training at the Shaikh Borhan's Khanaqah in the village of Sharafkand, Hemin joined the Kurdish Resurrection Party (Komeley Jiyanewey Kurd), founded in 1942. This was the first Kurdish political organization with a clear ambition for the establishment of an independent Greater Kurdistan. During the WWII when the Red Army invaded parts of northern Iran, including most of Azarbaijan and parts of Kurdistan, KJK changed its name to Kurdish Democratic Party and declared the first Kurdish republic with Mahabad as its capital. Mukriyani, along with his best friend Abd-al-Rahman Sharafkandi (Hazhar), was named the Kurdish national poet of the Republic of Mahabad, and became the secretary of Haji Baba Shaikh (Hadschi Baba Scheich), the prime minister and head of the self-proclaimed Republic. He fled the oppression that followed the downfall of the Republic in December 1946 and he took refuge in Sulaimaniya in Iraqi Kurdistan, where he was arrested. He was released after a while. After the agreements of 11 March 1970, which allowed the Kurdish insurgents and Baghdad's central government a four years' respite, Hemin settled down in Baghdad and became an active member of the Kurdish Academy of Science. birth_date 1920 birth_place Mahabad, Eastern Kurdistan death_date 1991 Biography Hejar was born in the city of Mahabad in north-western Iran. He began religious studies in early childhood, but was forced to abandon it when he lost his father at the age of 17. He started writing poems in Kurdish (Kurdish language) around 1940. Through his readings, he came under the influence of famous Kurdish poets such as Malaye Jaziri, Ahmad Khani, Wafaei and Haji Qadir Koyi. He was involved in the Kurdish movement led by Qazi Muhammad and was appointed as one of the official poets of the Republic of Mahabad in 1947. After the fall of the republic, he was forced into exile. For about 30 years, he lived in different countries such as Iraq, Syria, Lebanon and Egypt. In Iraq, he became involved in the nationalist movement led by Mustafa Barzani, with whom he developed a close friendship. In 1975, after the defeat of the movement, he moved back to Iran, and settled in the city of Karaj, where he lived until his death on February 22, 1990. He is buried in his home town of Mahabad. DATE OF BIRTH 1920 PLACE OF BIRTH Mahabad, Eastern Kurdistan DATE OF DEATH February 22, 1990 Early life and career Nali was born in Khaku-Khol, a village belongs to Sharbajer area or Shahrazur or Sharazur in Sulaimany, Kurdistan region of Iraq. As was the custom in the old days in Kurdistan, he started studying the Quran first and Arabic language in mosques in Kurdistan, then he became a Faqi. “Faqi is a Mullah’s student, which is the name of students in mosques. During the process of becoming a Faqi, he visited many cities in the whole of Kurdistan or Iran and Iraq, cities like; Sennah, Mahabad, Halabja, and Sulaimany. In Qaradakh he studied under Shaikh Muhammed Ibin al Khayat, in Sulaimany in Saiyd Hasan Mosque, he studied under Mullah Abdoullah Rash, also in Qaradax he studied mathematics under Shaikh Ali Mullah. He spent long time in the Khanaqa of Mawlana Khalid in Sulaimany. He also studied under Shaikh Awla Kharpani. '''Wafaei''' or '''Wefayî''', (1844-1902), was a Kurdish (Kurdish people) poet. His real name was ''Abdorrahim''. He was born in Mahabad in present-day north-western Iran. He finished religious studies in Mahabad and became a cleric, and a teacher in the local school. He moved to Sulaimaniya in 1900 and stayed there for a while. He travelled to Mecca three times, the last one in 1902. He was accompanied by the Kurdish poet Piramerd. During his last pilgrimage, he became ill and died in the region between Iraq and Syria. Since Mamle was a Kurdish political activist, he was arrested several times by the Iranian government. He died on the 13 January 1999 at the age of 74 in the Kurdish city of Mahabad, and was buried there in the Budak Sultan graves. He is very popular in all over Kurdistan region especially in his hometown Mahabad and the neighuring Piranshahr. Kurdish Women in Iran During World War I, Kurdish women suffered from attacks of Russian and Turkish armies. In 1915, Russian army massacred the male population of Mahabad and abused two hundred women. Reza Shah issued his decree for coercive unveiling of women in 1936. According to government correspondence, there was no need for unveiling in Kurdistan (Iranian Kurdistan), since women were usually unveiled. Nevertheless, government treated the colorful traditional Kurdish female custome as ''ugly and dirty'' and it had to be replaced with ''civilized''(i.e. Western) dress. Kurds called this forced dress as Ajami rather than European. ''Violence and culture: Confidential records about the abolition of hijab 1934-1943'', Iran National Archives, Tehran, 1992, pp.171, 249-250, 273. The Solitude of the Stateless: Kurdish Women at the Margins of Feminist Knowledge On July 13, unconfirmed reports began to emerge of a general strike in the four largely-Kurdish (w:Kurdish people) provinces in the north-west of Iran which make up Iranian Kurdistan (w:Iranian Kurdistan). Videos showed empty, deserted streets and shuttered shops in Mahabad (w:Mahabad), Saghez (w:Saghez) and other Kordestani cities. The reports of the strike coincide with the twentieth anniversary of the murder of Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou (w:Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou), the leader of the Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran (w:Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran) (PDKI).


opposition including

Iran, the Soviet-backed Kurdish Republic of Mahabad declared independence in parts of Iranian Kurdistan. Nevertheless, the Soviet forces left Iran in May 1946, and the self-declared republic fell to the Iranian army after only a few months and the president of the republic Qazi Muhammad was hanged publicly in Mahabad. After the 1953 Iranian coup d'état, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi became more autocratic and suppressed most opposition including Kurdish political groups seeking

a few months and the president of the republic Qazi Muhammad was hanged publicly in Mahabad. After the 1953 Iranian coup d'état, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi became more autocratic and suppressed most opposition including Kurdish political groups seeking greater rights for Iranian Kurds. He also prohibited any teaching of the Kurdish language. In Iran, Kurds express their cultural identity freely, but have no self-government


parts

Iran, the Soviet-backed Kurdish Republic of Mahabad declared independence in parts of Iranian Kurdistan. Nevertheless, the Soviet forces left Iran in May 1946, and the self-declared republic fell to the Iranian army after only a few months and the president of the republic Qazi Muhammad was hanged publicly in Mahabad. After the 1953 Iranian coup d'état, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi became more autocratic and suppressed most opposition including Kurdish political groups seeking

greater rights for Iranian Kurds. He also prohibited any teaching of the Kurdish language. In Iran, Kurds express their cultural identity freely, but have no self-government or administration. As in all parts of Iran, membership of a non-governmental political party is punishable by imprisonment or even death. Kurdish human rights activists in Iran have been threatened by Iranian authorities.

in the organization of peaceful protests throughout Kurdistan province. According to an Iran analyst at International Crisis Group, "Kurds, who live in the some of the least developed parts of Iran, pose the most serious internal problem for Iran to resolve, and given what they see next door--the newfound confidence of Iraqi Kurds


open amp

ENGMDE130102005?open&of ENG-370 Iran: Threats against Kurdish human rights defenders must stop Following the killing of Kurdish opposition activist Shivan Qaderi and two other Kurdish men by Iranian security forces in Mahabad on July 9, 2005

or administration. As in all parts of Iran, membership of a non-governmental political party is punishable by imprisonment or even death. Kurdish human rights activists in Iran have been threatened by Iranian authorities in connection with their work.open&of ENG-370 Iran: Threats against Kurdish human rights defenders must stop Status of minorities


622

;ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CBUQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q %22Qazi%20Mohammad%20in%20Mahabad%20(Iranian%20Kurdistan)%22&f false p. 56. Marion Farouk-Sluglett, Peter Sluglett, ''Iraq Since 1958: From Revolution to Dictatorship'', .B.Tauris, 2001, ISBN 978-1-86064-622-5,


296

;ref Nowadays, there is a community of nearly 1.7 million people who are descendants of the tribes deported from Kurdistan to Khurasan (Northeastern Iran) by the Safavids.<

-- ISBN 0-89158-296-7 O. Dzh. Dzhalilov, ''Kurdski geroicheski epos "Zlatoruki Khan"'' (''The Kurdish heroic epic "Gold-hand Khan"''), Moscow, 1967, pp. 5–26, 37–39, 206. thumb 200px Kurdish independent kingdoms and autonomous principalities circa 1835. (Image:Kurdish states 1835.png) The modernizing and centralizing efforts of Sultan Mahmud II, antagonized Kurdish feudal chiefs. As a result two powerful Kurdish


modern history/

'''Wafaei''' or '''Wefayî''', (1844-1902), was a Kurdish (Kurdish people) poet. His real name was ''Abdorrahim''. He was born in Mahabad in present-day north-western Iran. He finished religious studies in Mahabad and became a cleric, and a teacher in the local school. He moved to Sulaimaniya in 1900 and stayed there for a while. He travelled to Mecca three times, the last one in 1902. He was accompanied by the Kurdish poet Piramerd. During his last pilgrimage, he became ill and died in the region between Iraq and Syria. Since Mamle was a Kurdish political activist, he was arrested several times by the Iranian government. He died on the 13 January 1999 at the age of 74 in the Kurdish city of Mahabad, and was buried there in the Budak Sultan graves. He is very popular in all over Kurdistan region especially in his hometown Mahabad and the neighuring Piranshahr. Kurdish Women in Iran During World War I, Kurdish women suffered from attacks of Russian and Turkish armies. In 1915, Russian army massacred the male population of Mahabad and abused two hundred women. Reza Shah issued his decree for coercive unveiling of women in 1936. According to government correspondence, there was no need for unveiling in Kurdistan (Iranian Kurdistan), since women were usually unveiled. Nevertheless, government treated the colorful traditional Kurdish female custome as ''ugly and dirty'' and it had to be replaced with ''civilized''(i.e. Western) dress. Kurds called this forced dress as Ajami rather than European. ''Violence and culture: Confidential records about the abolition of hijab 1934-1943'', Iran National Archives, Tehran, 1992, pp.171, 249-250, 273. The Solitude of the Stateless: Kurdish Women at the Margins of Feminist Knowledge On July 13, unconfirmed reports began to emerge of a general strike in the four largely-Kurdish (w:Kurdish people) provinces in the north-west of Iran which make up Iranian Kurdistan (w:Iranian Kurdistan). Videos showed empty, deserted streets and shuttered shops in Mahabad (w:Mahabad), Saghez (w:Saghez) and other Kordestani cities. The reports of the strike coincide with the twentieth anniversary of the murder of Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou (w:Abdul Rahman Ghassemlou), the leader of the Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran (w:Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran) (PDKI).


quot title

under the leadership of Kurdish nationalist Qazi Muhammad. The republic received strong support from the Soviet Union, which occupied Iran during the same era and included the Kurdish towns of '''Bukan''', Piranshahr, Sardasht and Oshnavieh.


opposition

Iran, the Soviet-backed Kurdish Republic of Mahabad declared independence in parts of Iranian Kurdistan. Nevertheless, the Soviet forces left Iran in May 1946, and the self-declared republic fell to the Iranian army after only a few months and the president of the republic Qazi Muhammad was hanged publicly in Mahabad. After the 1953 Iranian coup d'état, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi became more autocratic and suppressed most opposition including Kurdish political groups seeking

ENGMDE130102005?open&of ENG-370 Iran: Threats against Kurdish human rights defenders must stop Following the killing of Kurdish opposition activist Shivan Qaderi and two other Kurdish men by Iranian security forces in Mahabad on July 9, 2005

a few months and the president of the republic Qazi Muhammad was hanged publicly in Mahabad. After the 1953 Iranian coup d'état, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi became more autocratic and suppressed most opposition including Kurdish political groups seeking greater rights for Iranian Kurds. He also prohibited any teaching of the Kurdish language. In Iran, Kurds express their cultural identity freely, but have no self-government

Mahabad

'''Mahabad''' (

The city's population is predominantly Kurdish (Kurdish people), with the city lying south of Lake Urmia in a narrow valley 1,300 metres above sea level in Iranian Kurdistan, a part of northwestern Iran. S. J. Laizer, ''Martyrs, Traitors, and Patriots: Kurdistan after the Gulf War'', Zed Books, 1996, ISBN 978-1-85649-396-3, p. 56. Marion Farouk-Sluglett, Peter Sluglett, ''Iraq Since 1958: From Revolution to Dictatorship'', .B.Tauris, 2001, ISBN 978-1-86064-622-5, p. 28.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017