Lytton, British Columbia

What is Lytton, British Columbia known for?


title literary

and political legacies of his great ancestor. between the valleys of the Stein River (N) and Kwoiek Creek (S). As a region and historical identity, the Cariboo is sometimes considered to extend to the Thompson River to the south of that, and to border on the city of Kamloops (Kamloops, British Columbia) at its southeastern corner and even as far as Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia), at the confluence of the Fraser and Thompson Rivers. The town of Lillooet (Lillooet, British Columbia) is generally considered to be in the Cariboo, while the Bridge River Country to its west was sometimes referred to as the West Cariboo, as were also the ranches along the west side of the Fraser northwards towards the Gang Ranch (Gang Ranch, British Columbia). Broader meanings of "the Cariboo" sometimes include the Chilcotin (Chilcotin District), west of the Fraser. The geographic region known as the Quesnel Highland, which forms a mountainous series of foothills between the plateau proper and the Cariboo Mountains, is likewise considered to be part of the Cariboo in a cultural-historical sense – not the least because it is the location of the famous Cariboo goldfields (Cariboo Gold Rush) and the one-time economic capital of the Interior of British Columbia, Barkerville (Barkerville, British Columbia). Governorship of Sir James Douglas The influx of people into the new colony required Douglas to act quickly in drawing up regulations and creating infrastructure. Magistrates and constables were hired, mining regulations drawn up, and townsites surveyed at Yale, Hope (Hope, British Columbia) and Fort Langley (Fort Langley, British Columbia) in order to discourage squatting on crown land. In addition, roads were constructed into the areas of greatest mining exploration around Lillooet (Lillooet, British Columbia) and Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia). The colony, however, was not immediately granted a representative (representative government) colonial assembly, because of uncertainty as to whether the gold rush would yield a stable, settled population. Douglas, who had endured unhappy conflicts with the assembly on Vancouver Island, was relieved. thumb right A portion of the Cariboo Road (File:Cariboo Road.jpg) in the Fraser Canyon, circa 1867. thumb Skihist Provincial Park (File:Skihist Provincial Park (157709431).jpg) '''Skihist Provincial Park''' is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, located on the Thompson River and adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway between the towns of Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia) (W) and Spences Bridge (Spences Bridge, British Columbia) (E). The park is named for Skihist Mountain, which is visible from the park though on the opposite side of the Fraser River to the west of Lytton. The Ktunaxa (Kutenai) people who neighboured the Sinixt to the east were driven further into the mountains by the Blackfoot, who had obtained control of Ktunaxa territory in the foothills and northwestern plains. Ethnographic and historical evidence suggests the Ktunaxa and the Sinixt battled each other over the territory along the lower Kootenay River between the present cities of Nelson (Nelson, British Columbia) and Castlegar, British Columbia. The Ktunaxa were considered the intruders, and the dispute was reportedly ended after the Sinixt mounted a large-scale raid into (Lower) Ktunaxa Territory at the south end of Kootenay Lake. The Sinixt later renewed their historic peace with the Ktunaxa, and took common cause with them, the Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles (tribe)), the Flathead (Choctaw), the Coeur d'Alene (#Coeur D'Alene Tribe), the Spokane (Spokane (tribe)), the Nez Perce (Nez Perce tribe), and others against the Blackfoot. While the Sinixt never directly fought the Blackfoot as a group, it is very likely that individual Sinixt joined their Salishan neighbours (and the Ktunaxa) in war parties and buffalo hunts to the Western Plains. Reyes says they had ongoing skirmishes with the Blackfoot, from whom, according to him, they stole horses. Reyes 2002, p. 8. They also took part with other regional peoples in the punitive expedition in 1838 against the St'at'imc of Seton Lake led by Nicola (Hwistesmexteqen) (Nicola (chief)), chief of the Nicola people. James Teit, ''Papers of the Jesup North Pacific Expedition, History of the Okanagan people"'' They were allied with the interior tribes led by the Nlaka'pamux, who assembled at Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia) (Camchin) during the Fraser Canyon War of 1858. Hauka, Donald J., ''McGowan's War''


work literary

first Zachary date January 18, 2013 work Literary Digest accessdate 9 June 2013 However, Bulwer-Lytton is also responsible for well-known sayings such as "The pen is mightier than the sword" from his play ''Richelieu (Richelieu (play))''. Despite being a very popular author for 19th century readers, few people today are even aware of his prodigious body of literature spanning many genres. In the 21st century he is known best as the namesake for the Bulwer-Lytton


strong quot

with this meaning it is pronounced the same way as the "big and strong" meaning. A derivative usage of the skookum-as-monster context was the application of the name to a souvenir doll, simply called "a skookum", once common in tourist areas such as gift shops. *Skookum, either alone or in the combination skookumchuck, occurs in dozens of placenames (List of Chinook Jargon placenames) throughout the Pacific Northwest region and beyond. A short form used with personal names, "Skook", is found on the map of British Columbia at Mount Skook Davidson near the confluence of the Kechika (Kechika River) and Gataga Rivers in northern British Columbia and Mount Skook Jim, near the head of the Stein River in the northern Lillooet Ranges between Pemberton (Pemberton, British Columbia) and Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia). Local lore in any area of British Columbia may have a Skookum Charlie or a Skookum Brown - the most famous of such nicknames was that of Skookum Jim, one of the co-discoverers of the Klondike (Klondike, Yukon) goldfields in the Yukon. *There is also a breed of purebred cat called a Skookum (Skookum (cat)). Location Located near Lytton, British Columbia, or 185 kilometres west of Kamloops, British Columbia. The '''Thompson-Nicola Regional District''' is a regional district in the Canadian province (Provinces and territories of Canada) of British Columbia. The Canada 2006 Census population was 122,286 and the area covers 45,279 square kilometres. The administrative offices are in the main population centre is the city of Kamloops (Kamloops, British Columbia), which accounts for 75 percent of the regional district's population. The only other city is Merritt (Merritt, British Columbia); however, there are locally important communities such as the District Municipality (district municipality) of Logan Lake (Logan Lake, British Columbia), and the Villages of Chase (Chase, British Columbia), Ashcroft (Ashcroft, British Columbia), Cache Creek (Cache Creek, British Columbia), Clinton (Clinton, British Columbia) and Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia). The region is named indirectly for the Thompson River by way of the traditional regional names of "the Thompson Country" and "the Nicola Country"; the Nicola Country was named for Chief Nicola (Nicola (chief)) and was originally "Nicola's Country", where he held sway; he is also the namesake of that river. The area is governed by the Thompson-Nicola Regional District which operates over 115 services including the region's libraries, solid waste management and recycling, emergency and development services, plus a film commission. between the valleys of the Stein River (N) and Kwoiek Creek (S). As a region and historical identity, the Cariboo is sometimes considered to extend to the Thompson River to the south of that, and to border on the city of Kamloops (Kamloops, British Columbia) at its southeastern corner and even as far as Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia), at the confluence of the Fraser and Thompson Rivers. The town of Lillooet (Lillooet, British Columbia) is generally considered to be in the Cariboo, while the Bridge River Country to its west was sometimes referred to as the West Cariboo, as were also the ranches along the west side of the Fraser northwards towards the Gang Ranch (Gang Ranch, British Columbia). Broader meanings of "the Cariboo" sometimes include the Chilcotin (Chilcotin District), west of the Fraser. The geographic region known as the Quesnel Highland, which forms a mountainous series of foothills between the plateau proper and the Cariboo Mountains, is likewise considered to be part of the Cariboo in a cultural-historical sense – not the least because it is the location of the famous Cariboo goldfields (Cariboo Gold Rush) and the one-time economic capital of the Interior of British Columbia, Barkerville (Barkerville, British Columbia). Governorship of Sir James Douglas The influx of people into the new colony required Douglas to act quickly in drawing up regulations and creating infrastructure. Magistrates and constables were hired, mining regulations drawn up, and townsites surveyed at Yale, Hope (Hope, British Columbia) and Fort Langley (Fort Langley, British Columbia) in order to discourage squatting on crown land. In addition, roads were constructed into the areas of greatest mining exploration around Lillooet (Lillooet, British Columbia) and Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia). The colony, however, was not immediately granted a representative (representative government) colonial assembly, because of uncertainty as to whether the gold rush would yield a stable, settled population. Douglas, who had endured unhappy conflicts with the assembly on Vancouver Island, was relieved. thumb right A portion of the Cariboo Road (File:Cariboo Road.jpg) in the Fraser Canyon, circa 1867. thumb Skihist Provincial Park (File:Skihist Provincial Park (157709431).jpg) '''Skihist Provincial Park''' is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, located on the Thompson River and adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway between the towns of Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia) (W) and Spences Bridge (Spences Bridge, British Columbia) (E). The park is named for Skihist Mountain, which is visible from the park though on the opposite side of the Fraser River to the west of Lytton. The Ktunaxa (Kutenai) people who neighboured the Sinixt to the east were driven further into the mountains by the Blackfoot, who had obtained control of Ktunaxa territory in the foothills and northwestern plains. Ethnographic and historical evidence suggests the Ktunaxa and the Sinixt battled each other over the territory along the lower Kootenay River between the present cities of Nelson (Nelson, British Columbia) and Castlegar, British Columbia. The Ktunaxa were considered the intruders, and the dispute was reportedly ended after the Sinixt mounted a large-scale raid into (Lower) Ktunaxa Territory at the south end of Kootenay Lake. The Sinixt later renewed their historic peace with the Ktunaxa, and took common cause with them, the Kalispel (Pend d'Oreilles (tribe)), the Flathead (Choctaw), the Coeur d'Alene (#Coeur D'Alene Tribe), the Spokane (Spokane (tribe)), the Nez Perce (Nez Perce tribe), and others against the Blackfoot. While the Sinixt never directly fought the Blackfoot as a group, it is very likely that individual Sinixt joined their Salishan neighbours (and the Ktunaxa) in war parties and buffalo hunts to the Western Plains. Reyes says they had ongoing skirmishes with the Blackfoot, from whom, according to him, they stole horses. Reyes 2002, p. 8. They also took part with other regional peoples in the punitive expedition in 1838 against the St'at'imc of Seton Lake led by Nicola (Hwistesmexteqen) (Nicola (chief)), chief of the Nicola people. James Teit, ''Papers of the Jesup North Pacific Expedition, History of the Okanagan people"'' They were allied with the interior tribes led by the Nlaka'pamux, who assembled at Lytton (Lytton, British Columbia) (Camchin) during the Fraser Canyon War of 1858. Hauka, Donald J., ''McGowan's War''


amp year

: climate.weatheroffice.gc.ca climateData dailydata_e.html?timeframe 2&Prov CA&StationID 966&Year 1941&Month 7&Day 26 title Daily Data Report for July 1941 publisher Environment Canada accessdate March 25, 2010 Lytton also holds the record for the hottest temperature ever recorded in the province during the month of August after the temperature reached on the August 14, 2004.

dailydata_e.html?timeframe 2&Prov BC&StationID 961&dlyRange 1990-03-01&Month 8&Year 2004&cmdB1 Go title Daily Data Report for August 2004 publisher Environment Canada accessdate February 13, 2013 Hot summer temperatures are made more tolerable by low humidity; however, the heat can be intense with usually clear blue skies and blazing sunlight – heat also radiates from the valley's slopes, and forest fires are not uncommon in the region during the summer. Lytton's


title famous

, exemplified by his most popular work, ''The Last Days of Pompeii''. He is best remembered today for the opening line to the novel ''Paul Clifford'', which begins "It was a dark and stormy night..." and is considered by some to be the worst opening sentence in the English language.


rich gold

in earnest. The first major find, and among the largest on the river, was at Hill's Bar about 15 kilometres south of Fort Yale (Yale, British Columbia), which had become the epicentre of the gold rush as it was at the head of river navigation and at the foot of the Fraser Canyon and its difficult trails and rich gold-bearing bars. Hill's Bar's first claim, known as the "Boatmen of San Francisco", worked the bar alongside Chief Kowpelst (Kowpelst) and his people


novels quot

Fiction Contest (BLFC), sponsored annually by the English Department at San Jose State University, which challenges entrants "to compose the opening sentence to the worst of all possible novels". Lord Lytton literary debate On August 30, 2008, the Village of Lytton invited Henry Lytton-Cobbold, the great-great-great grandson of Edward Bulwer-Lytton, to defend the great man's honour by debating Professor Scott Rice, the sponsor of the BLFC, on the literary


large gold

and Washington Territory, despite an injunction from Douglas that all access to the goldfields would be through Victoria only. Those who came by those routes, the busiest but war-ridden Okanagan Trail, also spread farther afield in the Interior, leading to gold discoveries further and further afield and a string of small and large gold rushes including what would become the largest and most famous, the Cariboo (Cariboo Gold Rush). Not for nothing that among the most common sobriquet used


historical sense

of "the Cariboo" sometimes include the Chilcotin (Chilcotin District), west of the Fraser. The geographic region known as the Quesnel Highland, which forms a mountainous series of foothills between the plateau proper and the Cariboo Mountains, is likewise considered to be part of the Cariboo in a cultural-historical sense – not the least because it is the location of the famous Cariboo goldfields (Cariboo Gold Rush) and the one-time economic capital of the Interior


range line

, British Columbia Mount Currie . "The Stein" is the largest unlogged watershed in the southern Coast Mountains and, like the rest of the Lillooet Ranges, varies from coastal-type alpine in the west to desert-canyon arid on its east. It and the neighbouring Marble Range line the east bank of the Fraser River north of the town of Lytton, British Columbia. The Clear Range extends as far as the town of Pavilion (Pavilion, British Columbia) and is bounded by the south

, which drains northeast to join the Bonaparte River, a tributary of the Thompson (Thompson River). All of these areas, including the Clear Range, are classified by geographers as belonging to the Fraser Plateau, which is part of the Interior Plateau. It and the neighbouring Marble Range line the east bank of the Fraser River north of the town of Lytton, British Columbia. The Clear Range extends as far as the town of Pavilion (Pavilion, British Columbia) and is bounded

Lytton, British Columbia

'''Lytton''' in British Columbia, Canada, sits at the confluence of the Thompson River and Fraser River on the east side of the Fraser. The location has been inhabited by the Nlaka'pamux people for over 10,000 years, and is one of the earliest locations settled by non-natives in the Southern Interior of British Columbia (British Columbia Interior), having been founded during the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush of 1858–59, when it was originally known as '''"The Forks"'''. The community includes both the Village of Lytton and the surrounding Indian Reserves of the Lytton Indian Band (Lytton First Nation), whose name for the community is Camchin, also spelled Kumsheen ("river meeting").

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