Lviv

What is Lviv known for?


artistic activities

Region Europe (List of World Heritage Sites in Europe) Year 1998 Session 22nd Link http: whc.unesco.org en list 865 Lviv is one of the most important cultural centres of Ukraine. The city is known as a centre of art, literature, music and theatre. Nowadays, the indisputable evidences of the city cultural richness is a big number of theatres, concert halls, creative unions, and also high number of many artistic activities (more than 100 festivals annually, 60 museums, 10


architecture high

). * Shevchenkivskyi Hay, in the park situated unique open air museum that has gathered the best collection of Ukrainian wooden architecture. * High Castle Park, the park is situated on the highest city hill (413 m) and occupies the territory of 36 hectares consisting of the lower terrace once called Knyazha Hora (Prince Mount), and the upper terrace with a television tower and artificial embankment. * Zalizni Vody Park, the park originated from the former garden Zalizna Voda (Iron


previous home

, the previous home of Dynamo Kyiv (which presently only uses the stadium for major European matches). The alternative stadiums include: Ukraina (Ukraina Stadium) (Lviv), Dnipro Stadium (Dnipropetrovsk), Chornomorets (Chornomorets Stadium) (Odessa), Metalist (Metalist Stadium) (Kharkiv), and now most recently Donbass Arena, along with many others. However as new infrastructure and stadiums are built (especially in preparation for Euro 2012), other venues

will include stadiums in the cities of Lviv, Donetsk, Odessa, among others. Stadiums The most important matches of the Ukrainian national team are held in Kiev's Olimpiysky National Sports Complex, the previous home of Dynamo Kyiv (which presently only uses the stadium for major European matches). The alternative stadiums include: Ukraina (Ukraina Stadium) (Lviv), Dnipro Stadium (Dnipropetrovsk), Chornomorets (Chornomorets Stadium) ( Odessa


political writing

Pavlyk and Ostap Terletsky. They were accused of belonging to a secret socialist organization, which did not in fact exist. However, the nine months in prison did not discourage his political writing or activities. In prison Franko wrote the satire ''Smorhonska Akademiya'' (''The Smorhon Academy''). After release, he studied the works of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, contributed articles to the Polish newspaper ''Praca (Praca (newspaper))'' (Labor) and helped organize workers


great personal

Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


innovative design

Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


hot amp

checkout price €28-€55 (breakfast included) content Hotel "NTON" has been in operation since January 2001. Offers more than 70 modern comfortable rooms equipped with phones, TV-sat, showers and bathrooms, air conditioning, hairdryers, refrigerators with mini-bars. Hot & cold water is around a clock, heating is autonomous. Services include restaurant, guarded parking place, 4 conference halls, business center and free wireless Internet. The hotel transfer service brings you


culture military

government emphasized the Polish nature of the city and limited public displays of Jewish and Ukrainian culture. Military parades and commemorations of battles at particular streets within the city, all celebrating the Polish forces who fought against the Ukrainians in 1918, became frequent, and in the 1930s a vast memorial monument and burial ground of Polish soldiers (Cemetery of the Defenders of Lwów) from that conflict was built in the city's Lychakiv Cemetery. The Polish government fostered the idea of Lviv as an eastern Polish outpost standing strong against eastern "hordes." Paul Robert Magocsi. (2005)Galicia: a Multicultured Land. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. pp.144–145 World War II and Soviet occupation Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


special role

Commons:Category:Lviv Wikipedia:Lviv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Lviv Oblast Lviv


single event

Swedish Championship , a title he's won six times since, including three times in a row from 1997 to 1999. That year, he also won a bronze medal at the Junior World Championships in Lviv. In 1991, he made his debut at the World Championship in Göteborg, and surprised many by winning silver (silver medal). This promising performance was followed up by two fourteenth-places at the next World Championship, before he won the last single-event World Championships in an extra play-off race

Lviv

'''Lviv''' ( , Latin: ''Leopolis'', ''the city of the lion'') is a city in western Ukraine that was once a major population centre of the Halych-Volyn Principality, the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland, the Habsburg Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, and later the capital of Lwów Voivodeship during the Second Polish Republic.

Formerly capital of the historical region of Galicia (Galicia (Eastern Europe)), Lviv is now regarded as one of the main cultural centres of today's Ukraine (Ukrainian culture). The historical heart of Lviv with its old buildings and cobblestone streets has survived Soviet and Nazi occupation during World War II largely unscathed. The city has many industries and institutions of higher education such as Lviv University and Lviv Polytechnic. Lviv is also a home to many world-class cultural institutions, including a philharmonic orchestra and the famous Lviv Theatre of Opera and Ballet. The historic city centre (Old Town (Lviv)) is on the UNESCO World Heritage List (List of World Heritage Sites in Europe#Ukraine). Lviv celebrated its 750th anniversary with a ''son et lumière (son et lumière (show))'' in the city centre in September 2006.

The archaeological traces of settlement on the site of Lviv city date from as early as the 5th century. Archaeological excavations in 1977 showed Lendian (Lendians) settlement between the 8th and 10th centuries AD. In 1031 the settlement site with the rest of adjacent region was conquered from Mieszko II Lambert King of Poland by prince Yaroslav the Wise. After the invasion of Batu Khan, the city was rebuilt in 1240 by King Daniel (Daniel of Galicia) of the Rurik Dynasty, ruler of the medieval Ruthenian (Ruthenians) kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia, and named after his son, Lev (Lev I of Galicia).

The first record of Lviv in chronicles dates from 1256. In 1340 Galicia (Galicia (Eastern Europe)) including Lviv were incorporated into the Kingdom of Poland (Kingdom of Poland (1025–1385)) by Casimir III the Great by inheritance from prince Bolesław Jerzy II of Mazovia. In 1356, Lviv received Magdeburg Rights from King Casimir III the Great. Lviv belonged to the Kingdom of Poland (Crown of the Kingdom of Poland) till 1772. Under subsequent partitions (Partitions of Poland), Lviv became part of the Austrian Empire. From 1918, the city of Lviv became the capital of the Lwów Voivodeship of the Second Polish Republic, until the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939; it later fell into German hands. On 22 July 1944, following the successful Lwów Uprising, Lviv was liberated from Nazi occupation by Polish troops (Armia Krajowa), cooperating with advancing Soviet forces.

From the 15th century the city acted as a major Polish and later also as a Jewish cultural centre, with Poles and Jews comprising a demographic majority of the city until the outbreak of World War II, and the Holocaust, and the population transfers of Poles (Polish population transfers (1944–1946)) that followed. The other ethnic groups living within the city – Germans, Ruthenians (Ukrainians), and Armenians – also contributed greatly to Lviv's culture. With the joint German–Soviet Invasion of Poland at the outbreak of World War II, the city of Lwów and its province (Lwów Voivodeship) were annexed by the Soviet Union (territories of Poland annexed by the Soviet Union) and became part (occupation of Poland (1939–45)) of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic from 1939 to 1941. Between 30 June 1941 and 27 July 1944 Lwów was under German occupation, and was located in the General Government. On 27 July 1944 it was captured (Lwów Uprising) by the Soviet Red Army (Red Army). According to the agreements of the Yalta Conference, Lwów was transferred to the Ukrainian SSR, most of the Poles living in Lwów were deported into lands newly acquired from Germany under terms of the Potsdam Agreement (officially termed Recovered Territories in Poland), and the city became the main centre of the western part of Soviet Ukraine, inhabited predominantly by Ukrainians with a significant Russian minority.

After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, the city of Lviv remained a part of the now independent Ukraine, for which it currently serves as the administrative centre of Lviv Oblast, and is designated as its own raion (district) within that oblast.

On 12 June 2009 the Ukrainian magazine ''Focus (Focus (Ukrainian magazine))'' judged Lviv the best Ukrainian city to live in. Lviv is the best city for living in Ukraine – rating, UNIAN (Ukrainian Independent Information Agency) (12 June 2009) Its more Western European flavor has earned it the nickname the "Little Paris of Ukraine" . The city expected a sharp increase in the number of foreign visitors as a venue for UEFA Euro 2012, and as a result a major new airport terminal has been built.

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