Lusitania

What is Lusitania known for?


game series

as ''Lusophone'', meaning Portuguese-speaking, and ''Lusitanic'', referring to the Community of Portuguese Language Countries — once Portugal's colonies (Portuguese Empire) and presently independent countries still sharing some common heritage. In popular culture In the second book in the science fiction novels comprising the Ender's Game Series, titled ''Speaker for the Dead'', the inhabitants of the colony have named their new planet ''Lusitania''. It is explained


power news

and Vespasian—successively vied for imperial power. News of Nero's death reached Vespasian as he was preparing to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Almost simultaneously the Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis (modern Spain), as Emperor of Rome. Rather than continue his campaign, Vespasian decided to await further orders and send Titus to greet the new Emperor. Sullivan (1953), p. 69 Before reaching Italy however, Titus

, during which the four most influential generals in the Roman Empire—Galba, Otho, Vitellius and Vespasian—successively vied for the imperial power. News of Nero's death reached Vespasian as he was preparing to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Almost simultaneously the Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis (modern Spain), as Emperor of Rome. Rather than continue his campaign, Vespasian decided to await further orders and send


population great

required the involvement and support of the general population. Great Britain was subjected to bombing raids by both dirigibles and airplanes (fixed-wing aircraft), resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. Attacks on non combat ships, like the Lusitania, presented another threat to non combatants. The British responded with an organized effort which was soon copied in the US. This was formalized with the creation of the Council of National Defense on August 29, 1916. Civil defense responsibilities at the federal level were vested in this council, with subsidiary councils at the state and local levels providing additional support—a multi-level structure which was to remain throughout the history of United States civil defense.


growing opposition

indicate provinces loyal to Vespasian and Gaius Licinius Mucianus. Green areas indicate provinces loyal to Vitellius. On 9 June 68, amidst growing opposition of the Senate (Roman Senate) and the army, Nero committed suicide, and with him the Julio-Claudian dynasty came to an end. Chaos ensued, leading to a year of brutal civil war known as the Year of the Four Emperors, during which the four most influential generals in the Roman Empire—Galba, Otho, Vitellius and Vespasian—successively vied for imperial power. News of Nero's death reached Vespasian as he was preparing to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Almost simultaneously the Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis (modern Spain), as Emperor of Rome. Rather than continue his campaign, Vespasian decided to await further orders and send Titus to greet the new Emperor. Sullivan (1953), p. 69 Before reaching Italy however, Titus learnt that Galba had been murdered and replaced by Otho, the governor of Lusitania (modern Portugal). At the same time Vitellius and his armies in Germania had risen in revolt, and prepared to march on Rome, intent on overthrowing Otho. Not wanting to risk being taken hostage by one side or the other, Titus abandoned the journey to Rome and rejoined his father in Judaea. Wellesley (2000), p. 44 Assassination M. Salvius Otho (Otho), formerly governor of Lusitania, and one of Galba's earliest supporters, disappointed at not being chosen instead of Piso, entered into communication with the discontented Praetorians, and was adopted by them as their emperor. Galba at once set out to meet the rebels, though he was so feeble that he had to be carried in a litter. He was met by a troop of Otho's cavalry and was killed near Lacus Curtius. One guard, centurion Sempronius Densus, died defending him. Piso was killed shortly afterwards. According to Plutarch, during Galba's last moments he offered his neck, and said, "Strike, if it be for the good of the Romans!" According to Suetonius, Galba prior to his death had put on a linen corset—although remarking that it had little protection against so many swords. After his death, Galba's head was brought to Otho, who gave it to his camp followers who paraded and mocked it—the camp followers' mocking was their angry response to a remark by Galba that his strength was unimpaired. The head was then bought by a freedman so he could throw it on the place where his former master had been executed on Galba's orders. Galba's steward buried both head and trunk in a tomb by the Aurelian Road. In 666 the southern extreme of the province, beyond the Douro, was formally reincorporated into Lusitania, but the destruction of the Visigothic kingdom in 711 by the Arabs (Arab expansion), and the early reconquest of Coimbra by Galician forces in 866 led to the name ''Gallicia'' being applied not just to the westernmost areas north of the Douro, but alto to much of the north-west of the Iberian peninsula, In 1957 the remains were by Albert-Félix de Lapparent and Georges Zbyszewski named as a new species of ''Brachiosaurus'': ''Brachiosaurus atalaiensis''. A.F. de Lapparent & G. Zbyszewski, 1957, "Les dinosauriens du Portugal", ''Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série'' '''2''': 1-63 The specific name (specific name (zoology)) referred to the site, Atalaia (Atalaia (Lourinhã)). It was in 2003 by Octávio Mateus and Miguel Telles Antunes renamed a separate genus: ''Lusotitan''. The type species is ''Lusotitan atalaiensis''. The generic name is derived from ''Luso'', the Latin name for an inhabitant of Lusitania, and Greek Titan (Titan (mythology)), a mythological giant. Roman times The Romans (Ancient Rome) likely came to the Trabancos region in the 2nd century, during the campaigns of Lucius Licinius Lucullus (152 BC), but the area was peripheral to the regions of principal occupation, as well as to the creation of early towns and more importantly, trade routes: most travel routes were in the east of this region, which followed the river Eresma from the town of Coca (''Cauca'', in Roman times) and Matapozuelos village (''Nivaria'' in Roman times), up to Simancas (''Septimanca''); and at the west, for the "Vía de la Plata (Roman road#Spain)" ("silver road"), the most important Roman route in Lusitania Province. Nevertheless, it is known that in the Vallisoletan area, there was several villages that probably are of pre-Roman origin. In fact, the etymology of the word 'Trabancos' suggests a name originating before the Roman occupation. In 1909, Thomas Jeffery died and the leadership of the company passed to his son Charles, who, in 1914, renamed the car the Jeffery in honor of his late father. While successful, Charles Jeffery decided to leave auto making in 1915, following a harrowing ordeal in the sinking of the Lusitania. Jeffery’s wife had purchased a high-quality life preserver prior to her husband’s trip, and it saved his life. However the event also caused Jeffery to re-evaluate his life and priorities, and automaking wasn’t one of them; he sold the Jeffery concern to Charles Nash (Charles W. Nash), who renamed the concern the Nash Motors Company (Nash Motors). World War I Civil Defense truly began to come of age, both worldwide and in the United States, during the first World War (World War I)--although it was usually referred to as ''civilian defense.'' This was the first major Total war, which required the involvement and support of the general population. Great Britain was subjected to bombing raids by both dirigibles and airplanes (fixed-wing aircraft), resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. Attacks on non combat ships, like the Lusitania, presented another threat to non combatants. The British responded with an organized effort which was soon copied in the US. This was formalized with the creation of the Council of National Defense on August 29, 1916. Civil defense responsibilities at the federal level were vested in this council, with subsidiary councils at the state and local levels providing additional support—a multi-level structure which was to remain throughout the history of United States civil defense.


quot play

as "game" or "play", while ''lyssa'' is a borrowing from the Greek (Greek language) λυσσα, "frenzy" or "rage", and sometimes rage personified; for later poets, Lusus and Lyssa become flesh-and-blood companions of Bacchus. Luís de Camões' ''Os Lusíadas'', which portrays Lusus as the founder of Lusitania, extends these ideas, which have no connection with modern etymology. In his work, "Geography", the classical geographer Strabo


books books

; translated by Wolf, pp. 73f 130px thumb right A reading campaign in East Timor (Image:Leia livros timor.jpg). The message reads "Read books! Books are open windows to the world". A '''Lusophone''' (or '''lusophone''') is someone who speaks the Portuguese language, either as a native, as an additional language, or as a learner. As an adjective, it means "Portuguese-speaking". The word itself is derived from the name of the ancient Ancient Rome Roman


national+poem

Fatherland) from the national poem Os Lusíadas and from all Epic Poetry and Chronicles of the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance. '''Luxitania''' and '''Portugraal''' (''Port of Grail'') in Esotericism and metaphysical literature. - '''Lusitanic''' (Portuguese (Portuguese language) '''Lusitânico'''), from Latin (Latin language) '''Lusitanicus''', adjective from '''Lusitania''', the name of a Roman (Ancient Rome) province in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the two official


short+written

of the Alentejo and the Algarve. The Lusitanians The '''Lusitanians''' (or '''Lusitani''' in Latin) were an Indo-European speaking people (Proto-Indo-Europeans) living in the Western Iberian Peninsula long before it became the Roman (Ancient Rome) province (Roman provinces) of Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura and a small part of Salamanca). They spoke the Lusitanian language, of which only a few short written fragments survive. Culturally


knowledge great

;, ''Britannia'' 10, 1979 The modern English pronunciation is . Boudicca. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. (accessed: December 20, 2007). It is suggested that the most comparable English name would be "Victoria". Rhys, Sir John. 1908. General Literature Committee: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain). ''Early Britain


early metal

economy in Hispania (economy of Hispania), in the provinces of Lusitania and Gallaecia, as producers and exporters to the Roman Empire. This continued under the Visigoths and then Al-Andalus Moorish rule, until the Kingdom of Portugal was established in 1139. The territory's mineral wealth made it an important strategic region during the early metal ages, and one of the first objectives of the Romans (Roman Empire) when invading the peninsula was to access the mines near New Carthage. After the Second Punic War, from 29 BC to 411 AD, Rome governed the Iberian peninsula, expanding and diversifying the economy, and extending trade with the Roman Empire. Indigenous peoples paid tribute to Rome through an intricate web of alliances and allegiances. The economy experienced a major production expansion, profiting from some of the best agricultural lands under Roman hegemony and fueled by roads, trade routes, and the minting (Mint (coin)) of coins, which eased commercial transactions. Lusitania developed, driven by an intensive mining industry; fields explored included the Aljustrel (Aljustrel mine) mines (Vipasca), São Domingos (Sao Domingos Mine), and Riotinto (Rio Tinto (river)) in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, which extended to Seville, and contained copper, silver, and gold. All mines belonged to the Roman Senate, and were operated by slaves (Slavery in ancient Rome). The '''Archaeological Ensemble of Mérida (Mérida, Spain) ''' is one of the largest and most extensive archaeological sites in Spain. Mainly of Emerita Augusta, ancient capital of Lusitania (current city of Mérida (Mérida, Spain)). It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1993. :'''''Julia of Mérida''' redirects here'' '''Eulalia of Mérida''' was a young Roman Christian (Early Christianity) martyred in Emerita, the capital of Lusitania (modern Mérida (Mérida, Spain) in Spain), conventionally during the persecution (Persecution of Christians#Persecution from the second century to Constantine) under Diocletian (Diocletian#Persecution of Christians) and Maximian. Other views place her death at the time of Trajan Decius (AD 249-51). In 1957 the remains were by Albert-Félix de Lapparent and Georges Zbyszewski named as a new species of ''Brachiosaurus'': ''Brachiosaurus atalaiensis''. A.F. de Lapparent & G. Zbyszewski, 1957, "Les dinosauriens du Portugal", ''Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série'' '''2''': 1-63 The specific name (specific name (zoology)) referred to the site, Atalaia (Atalaia (Lourinhã)). It was in 2003 by Octávio Mateus and Miguel Telles Antunes renamed a separate genus: ''Lusotitan''. The type species is ''Lusotitan atalaiensis''. The generic name is derived from ''Luso'', the Latin name for an inhabitant of Lusitania, and Greek Titan (Titan (mythology)), a mythological giant. Roman times The Romans (Ancient Rome) likely came to the Trabancos region in the 2nd century, during the campaigns of Lucius Licinius Lucullus (152 BC), but the area was peripheral to the regions of principal occupation, as well as to the creation of early towns and more importantly, trade routes: most travel routes were in the east of this region, which followed the river Eresma from the town of Coca (''Cauca'', in Roman times) and Matapozuelos village (''Nivaria'' in Roman times), up to Simancas (''Septimanca''); and at the west, for the "Vía de la Plata (Roman road#Spain)" ("silver road"), the most important Roman route in Lusitania Province. Nevertheless, it is known that in the Vallisoletan area, there was several villages that probably are of pre-Roman origin. In fact, the etymology of the word 'Trabancos' suggests a name originating before the Roman occupation. In 1909, Thomas Jeffery died and the leadership of the company passed to his son Charles, who, in 1914, renamed the car the Jeffery in honor of his late father. While successful, Charles Jeffery decided to leave auto making in 1915, following a harrowing ordeal in the sinking of the Lusitania. Jeffery’s wife had purchased a high-quality life preserver prior to her husband’s trip, and it saved his life. However the event also caused Jeffery to re-evaluate his life and priorities, and automaking wasn’t one of them; he sold the Jeffery concern to Charles Nash (Charles W. Nash), who renamed the concern the Nash Motors Company (Nash Motors). World War I Civil Defense truly began to come of age, both worldwide and in the United States, during the first World War (World War I)--although it was usually referred to as ''civilian defense.'' This was the first major Total war, which required the involvement and support of the general population. Great Britain was subjected to bombing raids by both dirigibles and airplanes (fixed-wing aircraft), resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. Attacks on non combat ships, like the Lusitania, presented another threat to non combatants. The British responded with an organized effort which was soon copied in the US. This was formalized with the creation of the Council of National Defense on August 29, 1916. Civil defense responsibilities at the federal level were vested in this council, with subsidiary councils at the state and local levels providing additional support—a multi-level structure which was to remain throughout the history of United States civil defense.

Lusitania

thumb 300px The Iberian peninsula in the time of Hadrian (File:Iberian Peninsula in 125.svg) (ruled 117–138 AD), showing, in western Iberia (Iberian Peninsula), the imperial province of '''Lusitania'' (Portugal and Extremadura) thumb right 300px Map of the Roman Hispania around 10 AD, Lusitania is colored in orange (File:Hispania 10dC Es.jpg)

'''Lusitania''' (

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