Lusitania

What is Lusitania known for?


religious history

the Suevi and the Visigoths — Germanic tribes (Germanic peoples) already Christianized — came into the Iberian Peninsula in the fifth century. Early Visigoths followed the Arian heresy (Arianism), but they joined Roman mainstream after the eighth century. The city of Braga played an important role in the religious history of the period, namely when of the renunciation of the Arian and Priscillianist heresies, at two synods held there in the sixth century, marking the origin of its ecclesiastical greatness. The Archbishops of Braga (Ecclesiastical history of Braga) retains the title of Primate of Portugal, and long claimed supremacy over the whole of the churches of Hispania. In 1947 by Manuel de Matos, collector of the Geological Survey of Portugal, fossils of a large sauropod were found in the Portuguese Lourinhã Formation dating to the Tithonian stage of the Late Jurassic. In 1957 the remains were by Albert-Félix de Lapparent and Georges Zbyszewski named as a new species of ''Brachiosaurus'': ''Brachiosaurus atalaiensis''. A.F. de Lapparent & G. Zbyszewski, 1957, "Les dinosauriens du Portugal", ''Mémoires des Services Géologiques du Portugal, nouvelle série'' '''2''': 1-63 The specific name (specific name (zoology)) referred to the site, Atalaia (Atalaia (Lourinhã)). It was in 2003 by Octávio Mateus and Miguel Telles Antunes renamed a separate genus: ''Lusotitan''. The type species is ''Lusotitan atalaiensis''. The generic name is derived from ''Luso'', the Latin name for an inhabitant of Lusitania, and Greek Titan (Titan (mythology)), a mythological giant. Roman times The Romans (Ancient Rome) likely came to the Trabancos region in the 2nd century, during the campaigns of Lucius Licinius Lucullus (152 BC), but the area was peripheral to the regions of principal occupation, as well as to the creation of early towns and more importantly, trade routes: most travel routes were in the east of this region, which followed the river Eresma from the town of Coca (''Cauca'', in Roman times) and Matapozuelos village (''Nivaria'' in Roman times), up to Simancas (''Septimanca''); and at the west, for the "Vía de la Plata (Roman road#Spain)" ("silver road"), the most important Roman route in Lusitania Province. Nevertheless, it is known that in the Vallisoletan area, there was several villages that probably are of pre-Roman origin. In fact, the etymology of the word 'Trabancos' suggests a name originating before the Roman occupation. In 1909, Thomas Jeffery died and the leadership of the company passed to his son Charles, who, in 1914, renamed the car the Jeffery in honor of his late father. While successful, Charles Jeffery decided to leave auto making in 1915, following a harrowing ordeal in the sinking of the Lusitania. Jeffery’s wife had purchased a high-quality life preserver prior to her husband’s trip, and it saved his life. However the event also caused Jeffery to re-evaluate his life and priorities, and automaking wasn’t one of them; he sold the Jeffery concern to Charles Nash (Charles W. Nash), who renamed the concern the Nash Motors Company (Nash Motors). World War I Civil Defense truly began to come of age, both worldwide and in the United States, during the first World War (World War I)--although it was usually referred to as ''civilian defense.'' This was the first major Total war, which required the involvement and support of the general population. Great Britain was subjected to bombing raids by both dirigibles and airplanes (fixed-wing aircraft), resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. Attacks on non combat ships, like the Lusitania, presented another threat to non combatants. The British responded with an organized effort which was soon copied in the US. This was formalized with the creation of the Council of National Defense on August 29, 1916. Civil defense responsibilities at the federal level were vested in this council, with subsidiary councils at the state and local levels providing additional support—a multi-level structure which was to remain throughout the history of United States civil defense.


power news

and Vespasian—successively vied for imperial power. News of Nero's death reached Vespasian as he was preparing to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Almost simultaneously the Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis (modern Spain), as Emperor of Rome. Rather than continue his campaign, Vespasian decided to await further orders and send Titus to greet the new Emperor. Sullivan (1953), p. 69 Before reaching Italy however, Titus

, during which the four most influential generals in the Roman Empire—Galba, Otho, Vitellius and Vespasian—successively vied for the imperial power. News of Nero's death reached Vespasian as he was preparing to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Almost simultaneously the Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis (modern Spain), as Emperor of Rome. Rather than continue his campaign, Vespasian decided to await further orders and send


population great

required the involvement and support of the general population. Great Britain was subjected to bombing raids by both dirigibles and airplanes (fixed-wing aircraft), resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. Attacks on non combat ships, like the Lusitania, presented another threat to non combatants. The British responded with an organized effort which was soon copied in the US. This was formalized with the creation of the Council of National Defense on August 29, 1916. Civil defense responsibilities at the federal level were vested in this council, with subsidiary councils at the state and local levels providing additional support—a multi-level structure which was to remain throughout the history of United States civil defense.


important ancient

;– discharged soldiers – of the army of Augustus, who founded the city; the name ''Mérida'' is an evolution of this) by order of Emperor Augustus (Caesar Augustus), to protect a pass and a bridge over the Guadiana river. The city became the capital of Lusitania province (Roman province), and one of the most important cities in the Roman empire. Mérida preserves more important ancient Roman monuments (Roman architecture) than any other city in Spain (including a Roman


classical world

isbn 9780306472572 year 2002 when writing about a people living near "Massilia" (Marseille). H. D. Rankin, According to the testimony of Julius Caesar and Strabo, the Latin name "


national poem

Fatherland) from the national poem Os Lusíadas and from all Epic Poetry and Chronicles of the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance. '''Luxitania''' and '''Portugraal''' (''Port of Grail'') in Esotericism and metaphysical literature. - '''Lusitanic''' (Portuguese (Portuguese language) '''Lusitânico'''), from Latin (Latin language) '''Lusitanicus''', adjective from '''Lusitania''', the name of a Roman (Ancient Rome) province in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the two official


short written

of the Alentejo and the Algarve. The Lusitanians The '''Lusitanians''' (or '''Lusitani''' in Latin) were an Indo-European speaking people (Proto-Indo-Europeans) living in the Western Iberian Peninsula long before it became the Roman (Ancient Rome) province (Roman provinces) of Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura and a small part of Salamanca). They spoke the Lusitanian language, of which only a few short written fragments survive. Culturally


knowledge great

;, ''Britannia'' 10, 1979 The modern English pronunciation is . Boudicca. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. (accessed: December 20, 2007). It is suggested that the most comparable English name would be "Victoria". Rhys, Sir John. 1908. General Literature Committee: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain). ''Early Britain


extremely+significant

non-existent. The opposite concept is lusophilia. Invading southern Iberia, Rechila took the provincial capitals of Mérida (Mérida, Spain) in 439 and Seville (Seville, Spain) in 441. Thompson, ''Romans and Barbarians'', 172. These conquests were extremely significant, but nothing of the sequence of events leading to them is known. The provinces of Lusitania, Baetica, and Carthaginiensis were subjected to the Suevi with the exception of the Levante


amp visual

until 298 AD, settled again by Suebi, Buri (Buri (Germanic tribe)), and Visigoths, and conquered by Moors. Other minor influences include some 5th century vestiges of Alan (Alans) settlement, which were found in Alenquer (Alenquer Municipality, Portugal), Coimbra and even Lisbon. Milhazes, José.amp;visual 16&rss 0 Os antepassados caucasianos dos portugueses – Rádio e Televisão de Portugal

Lusitania

thumb 300px The Iberian peninsula in the time of Hadrian (File:Iberian Peninsula in 125.svg) (ruled 117–138 AD), showing, in western Iberia (Iberian Peninsula), the imperial province of '''Lusitania'' (Portugal and Extremadura) thumb right 300px Map of the Roman Hispania around 10 AD, Lusitania is colored in orange (File:Hispania 10dC Es.jpg)

'''Lusitania''' (

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