Lusitania

What is Lusitania known for?


power news

and Vespasian—successively vied for imperial power. News of Nero's death reached Vespasian as he was preparing to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Almost simultaneously the Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis (modern Spain), as Emperor of Rome. Rather than continue his campaign, Vespasian decided to await further orders and send Titus to greet the new Emperor. Sullivan (1953), p. 69 Before reaching Italy however, Titus

, during which the four most influential generals in the Roman Empire—Galba, Otho, Vitellius and Vespasian—successively vied for the imperial power. News of Nero's death reached Vespasian as he was preparing to besiege the city of Jerusalem. Almost simultaneously the Senate had declared Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis (modern Spain), as Emperor of Rome. Rather than continue his campaign, Vespasian decided to await further orders and send


population great

required the involvement and support of the general population. Great Britain was subjected to bombing raids by both dirigibles and airplanes (fixed-wing aircraft), resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. Attacks on non combat ships, like the Lusitania, presented another threat to non combatants. The British responded with an organized effort which was soon copied in the US. This was formalized with the creation of the Council of National Defense on August 29, 1916. Civil defense responsibilities at the federal level were vested in this council, with subsidiary councils at the state and local levels providing additional support—a multi-level structure which was to remain throughout the history of United States civil defense.


books books

; translated by Wolf, pp. 73f 130px thumb right A reading campaign in East Timor (Image:Leia livros timor.jpg). The message reads "Read books! Books are open windows to the world". A '''Lusophone''' (or '''lusophone''') is someone who speaks the Portuguese language, either as a native, as an additional language, or as a learner. As an adjective, it means "Portuguese-speaking". The word itself is derived from the name of the ancient Ancient Rome Roman


quot play

as "game" or "play", while ''lyssa'' is a borrowing from the Greek (Greek language) λυσσα, "frenzy" or "rage", and sometimes rage personified; for later poets, Lusus and Lyssa become flesh-and-blood companions of Bacchus. Luís de Camões' ''Os Lusíadas'', which portrays Lusus as the founder of Lusitania, extends these ideas, which have no connection with modern etymology. In his work, "Geography", the classical geographer Strabo


historical people

in the book that it was named for the historical people and territory in Portugal, which the inhabitants are descended from. See also *Lusitanians *Lusitanian mythology *Lusitanian language *Emerita Augusta *Ophiussa *Portugal *History of Portugal *Timeline of Portuguese history *Spain *History of Spain *Timeline of Spanish history *Pre-Roman peoples of the Iberian Peninsula * Romanization of Hispania


distinct+quality

is Prior to modern times, horse breeds throughout Europe were known primarily by the name of the region where they were bred. Bennett, ''Conquerors'', p. 158 The Lusitano takes its name from ''Lusitania'', an ancient Roman name for the region that today is Portugal. A very similar horse, the Spanish Andalusian (Andalusian horse), originally described the horses of distinct

quality that came from Andalusia in Spain. Bennett, ''Conquerors'', p. 159 Some sources state that the Andalusian and the Lusitano are genetically the same breed, and the only difference is the country in which individual horses are born.


national+poem

Fatherland) from the national poem Os Lusíadas and from all Epic Poetry and Chronicles of the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance. '''Luxitania''' and '''Portugraal''' (''Port of Grail'') in Esotericism and metaphysical literature. - '''Lusitanic''' (Portuguese (Portuguese language) '''Lusitânico'''), from Latin (Latin language) '''Lusitanicus''', adjective from '''Lusitania''', the name of a Roman (Ancient Rome) province in the Iberian Peninsula and one of the two official


short written

of the Alentejo and the Algarve. The Lusitanians The '''Lusitanians''' (or '''Lusitani''' in Latin) were an Indo-European speaking people (Proto-Indo-Europeans) living in the Western Iberian Peninsula long before it became the Roman (Ancient Rome) province (Roman provinces) of Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura and a small part of Salamanca). They spoke the Lusitanian language, of which only a few short written fragments survive. Culturally


game series

as ''Lusophone'', meaning Portuguese-speaking, and ''Lusitanic'', referring to the Community of Portuguese Language Countries — once Portugal's colonies (Portuguese Empire) and presently independent countries still sharing some common heritage. In popular culture In the second book in the science fiction novels comprising the Ender's Game Series, titled ''Speaker for the Dead'', the inhabitants of the colony have named their new planet ''Lusitania''. It is explained


amp visual

until 298 AD, settled again by Suebi, Buri (Buri (Germanic tribe)), and Visigoths, and conquered by Moors. Other minor influences include some 5th century vestiges of Alan (Alans) settlement, which were found in Alenquer (Alenquer Municipality, Portugal), Coimbra and even Lisbon. Milhazes, José.amp;visual 16&rss 0 Os antepassados caucasianos dos portugueses – Rádio e Televisão de Portugal

Lusitania

thumb 300px The Iberian peninsula in the time of Hadrian (File:Iberian Peninsula in 125.svg) (ruled 117–138 AD), showing, in western Iberia (Iberian Peninsula), the imperial province of '''Lusitania'' (Portugal and Extremadura) thumb right 300px Map of the Roman Hispania around 10 AD, Lusitania is colored in orange (File:Hispania 10dC Es.jpg)

'''Lusitania''' (

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