Lebanon, Pennsylvania

What is Lebanon, Pennsylvania known for?


north lebanon

"GR1" , all of it land. Lebanon is bordered to the north and east by North Lebanon Township (North Lebanon Township, PA) (4.5 mi), to the south and east by South


major television

market. Of the major television network affiliates in this media market, only one, the Fox (Fox Broadcasting Company) affiliate WPMT, has its base of operations in York. Other stations in the market include NBC Affiliate WGAL, from Lancaster, ABC (American Broadcasting Company) affiliate WHTM-TV, CBS Affiliate WHP-TV, CW (The CW Television Network) Affiliate WLYH, and PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) member WITF-TV, all from Harrisburg. It is also


light quot

wvlancasterinfo.htm A Brief History of Lancaster County . Web.archive.org (1999-02-03). Retrieved on 2013-07-27. Lebanon was settled by European colonists in 1720, many with the family names of "Steitz" and "Light", along a creek that was then named "Steitz Creek". The Light patriarchs built a fort to protect against Indians and named it "Light's Fort". The town was laid out in 1753, incorporated as a borough on February 20, 1821, and became a city on November 25, 1885. It adopted the commission form of government, consisting of four councilmen and a mayor. In 1900, 17,628 people lived in Lebanon; in 1910, 19,240; in 1920; and in 1940, 27,206. Lebanon bologna was first made here. Lebanon was formerly home to a major steel mill operated by Bethlehem Steel. Points of interest thumb Reading Railroad station on Eighth Street (File:Lebanon Reading RR Station.jpg) Local points of interest listed on the National Register of Historic Places '''WITF-FM''' is a public radio station based in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, located on the FM dial (FM broadcasting) at 89.5 MHz. Since its debut on April 1, 1971, it has aired classical music and NPR news throughout central Pennsylvania, including the Susquehanna Valley, which includes Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania), Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania) and York (York, Pennsylvania). It is a sister station to the area's PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) member station, WITF-TV. Both stations are based at the WITF Public Media Center in Swatara Township (Swatara Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania). He first went into church work as a Lutheran pastor at Lebanon, Pennsylvania (1883–1903). He became editor in chief of the ''Lutheran Church Review'', which he had helped found and organize. (1889–1920). Between 1903 and 1920, Dr. Schmauk served in numerous capacities with the United Lutheran Church in America. Dr. Schmauk was President of the General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North American (General Council (Lutheran)) (1903–20). ''The Philadelphia Seminary Biographical Record 1864-1923''(edited By Luther D. Reed, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia. Issued By The Seminary And The Alumni Association. 1923)http: files.usgwarchives.org pa 1pa bios psbr3.txt WSBA was originally an ABC (American Broadcasting Company) affiliate. However, in 1961, the station switched to CBS and joined the Keystone Network which comprised WHP-TV in Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) and WLYH-TV in Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania). The three stations provided a strong combined signal with about 55% overlap. Initially, WHP-TV, WLYH and WSBA aired the same programming. By the late 1960s, while all three stations ran most of the CBS programming schedule, WHP-TV ran different local programming during non-network hours, while WLYH and WSBA continued to simulcast nearly all the broadcast day. WHP ran CBS shows that WSBA and WLYH preempted. These two stations ran programming that WHP preempted. All three ran most of the CBS lineup duplicating over 3 4 of the network's programs. In May 1983, Susquehanna sold WSBA-TV to Idaho-based Mohawk Broadcasting, who changed its calls to the current '''WPMT'''. The station signed off in August and returned to the air in September as an independent station--the first in the state outside Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. It was a typical UHF independent airing cartoons, sitcoms, movies, dramas, sports, and westerns. thumb left 175px WTAJ "TV-10" logo used from 1972 until 1995 (Image:WTAJ_TV-10_1986.png) In 1956, WFBG-AM-FM-TV was sold to the Annenberg family's Triangle Publications. In 1969, then-Governor of Pennsylvania Milton J. Shapp accused Triangle of using its three Pennsylvania television stations--WFBG-TV, WFIL-TV in Philadelphia (now WPVI-TV) and WLYH-TV in Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania)--to conduct a smear campaign against him. The FCC found that the charges were true, and forced Triangle to unload all of its broadcasting properties. WFBG-TV was among the last to be sold, going to Gateway Communications in October 1972 along with sister station WLYH. The radio stations weren't included in the sale because the FCC had barred common ownership of radio and television stations in all but a few cases a few months before the Shapp case. Accordingly, Gateway changed channel 10's call letters to the present-day '''WTAJ-TV''' (which stands for '''W'''e're '''T'''elevision for '''A'''ltoona and '''J'''ohnstown). The new calls were chosen to acknowledge channel 10's large viewership in Johnstown. Until 1982, Johnstown and Altoona State College were separate markets. Although Johnstown had a CBS affiliate of its own, WJNL-TV (channel 19), channel 10 had long claimed Johnstown as part of its primary coverage area; it provided a strong city-grade signal to almost the entire Johnstown market. Until the mid-1980s, it was also available on many cable systems in the Pittsburgh area because Pittsburgh's CBS affiliate, KDKA-TV, preempted a decent amount of CBS shows and most of the preempted shows aired on WTAJ. - 39. Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania)-Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania)-Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania)-York (York, Pennsylvania) '''WHP-DT2 (WHP-TV)''' 21.2 1 2006 New digital subchannel Newport Television airdate October 25, 1953 (1953 in television) location Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania) Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) York, Pennsylvania callsign_meaning '''W'''e're '''L'''ebanon (or '''L'''ancaster) '''Y'''ork '''H'''arrisburg The station signed-on October 25, 1953 (1953 in television) as an Independent (Independent station (North America)) with the call sign '''WLBR-TV'''. Licensed to Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania), it aired an analog signal on UHF channel 15 from a one kW (kilowatt) transmitter and 572 foot tower just north of Mount Gretna (Mount Gretna, Pennsylvania). The station was originally owned by the Lebanon Television Corporation formed by the Lebanon Broadcasting Company (WLBR radio (WLBR)) and the Lebanon News Publishing Company (''Lebanon Daily News''). In October 1954 after a power failure caused by Hurricane Hazel, the station went dark (Dark (broadcasting)). He was born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania to Jonathan and Verda (McGill) Brightbill and attended Pennsylvania Military College for two years before graduating from Pennsylvania State University in 1964. He went on to obtain a law degree at Duquesne University School of Law in 1970. Prior to being elected to the Senate in 1982, he served as Lebanon County District Attorney from 1977 to 1981. He was elected Majority Whip in 1989 and 1997 by the Republican caucus and became the Majority Leader in 2001 after Senator Joseph Loeper resigned in December 2000. Pennsylvania Manual: Floor Leaders


422

USGS Allentown map. PA 222 was designated as US 222. By the early 1930s the road then signed as US 22 became problematic for motorists in Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania) along the current U.S. Route 422 (U.S. Route 422 (Pennsylvania)); Reading (Reading, Pennsylvania) via U.S. Routes 22 and 222; and Allentown on Hamilton Street (US 22).

thumb right US 422 west approaching US 222 in Reading. (Image:Route 422 & 222.jpg) The eastern section of US 422 begins at an interchange with US 322 and PA 39 in Hershey (Hershey, Pennsylvania) near the Hershey Medical Center and just outside Hummelstown (Hummelstown, Pennsylvania). US 422 proceeds east as a two-or-three-lane highway, traveling through Palmyra (Palmyra, Pennsylvania), Annville, Pennsylvania Annville

and Cleona (Cleona, Pennsylvania). In Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania), US 422 departs Cumberland Street to southbound 12th Street then turns left onto Walnut Street as its eastbound alignment. Cumberland Street is its one-way westbound alignment. It returns to a two-to-three-lane road east from Lebanon to Myerstown (Myerstown, Pennsylvania), and Wernersville (Wernersville, Pennsylvania) prior to entering the Berks County (Berks County, Pennsylvania) city of Reading, Pennsylvania


662

Reading . thumb left East of Douglassville and Pennsylvania Route 662 PA 662 (Image:422 West Express ends.jpg) on US 422 west as the freeway ends. birth_date birth_place Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania), Pennsylvania awards 1988 ARCA Racing Series Rookie of the Year thumb left Gerhart in 1984 at Pocono (File:BobbyGerhartNascarCar71.jpg) '''Bobby Gerhart''' (born July 21, 1958, in Lebanon


school blue

is provided by the Lebanon School District and Cornwall-Lebanon School District. Private institutions include Lebanon Catholic High School, Blue Mountain Christian School, New Covenant Christian School and Lebanon Christian Academy. All three private institutions have a varsity sports department and an elementary, junior high, and senior high. Students in Lebanon School District also may attend the Lebanon County Career and Technology Center Lebanon County Career and Technology


personal history

attended Cedar Crest High School in Lebanon, Pennsylvania where he played baseball, football, and basketball. Reich started on the football team for his last two years in high school. He played quarterback in the Big 33 Football Classic (known as the "Super Bowl of high school games") his senior year of high school. Reich, Frank. Telephone Interview. 9 February 2009. Personal history Born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania, George Rentz received his undergraduate degree from Gettysburg College in 1903, which was at the time known as Pennsylvania College, and then graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary. He was ordained in 1909 and for the next eight years served as a Presbyterian minister for the Presbytery of Northumberland, as well as pastoring churches in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. A '''Fasnacht''', sometimes spelled '''Fastnacht''' or '''Faschnacht''' or '''Fosnot''' or '''Fosnaught''', is a fatty doughnut treat served traditionally on Fastnacht Day (Shrove Tuesday), the day before Lent starts. Fasnachts were made as a way to empty the pantry of lard, sugar, fat, and butter, which were traditionally fasted from during Lent. '''WITF-FM''' is a public radio station based in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, located on the FM dial (FM broadcasting) at 89.5 MHz. Since its debut on April 1, 1971, it has aired classical music and NPR news throughout central Pennsylvania, including the Susquehanna Valley, which includes Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania), Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania) and York (York, Pennsylvania). It is a sister station to the area's PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) member station, WITF-TV. Both stations are based at the WITF Public Media Center in Swatara Township (Swatara Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania). He first went into church work as a Lutheran pastor at Lebanon, Pennsylvania (1883–1903). He became editor in chief of the ''Lutheran Church Review'', which he had helped found and organize. (1889–1920). Between 1903 and 1920, Dr. Schmauk served in numerous capacities with the United Lutheran Church in America. Dr. Schmauk was President of the General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in North American (General Council (Lutheran)) (1903–20). ''The Philadelphia Seminary Biographical Record 1864-1923''(edited By Luther D. Reed, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia. Issued By The Seminary And The Alumni Association. 1923)http: files.usgwarchives.org pa 1pa bios psbr3.txt WSBA was originally an ABC (American Broadcasting Company) affiliate. However, in 1961, the station switched to CBS and joined the Keystone Network which comprised WHP-TV in Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) and WLYH-TV in Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania). The three stations provided a strong combined signal with about 55% overlap. Initially, WHP-TV, WLYH and WSBA aired the same programming. By the late 1960s, while all three stations ran most of the CBS programming schedule, WHP-TV ran different local programming during non-network hours, while WLYH and WSBA continued to simulcast nearly all the broadcast day. WHP ran CBS shows that WSBA and WLYH preempted. These two stations ran programming that WHP preempted. All three ran most of the CBS lineup duplicating over 3 4 of the network's programs. In May 1983, Susquehanna sold WSBA-TV to Idaho-based Mohawk Broadcasting, who changed its calls to the current '''WPMT'''. The station signed off in August and returned to the air in September as an independent station--the first in the state outside Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. It was a typical UHF independent airing cartoons, sitcoms, movies, dramas, sports, and westerns. thumb left 175px WTAJ "TV-10" logo used from 1972 until 1995 (Image:WTAJ_TV-10_1986.png) In 1956, WFBG-AM-FM-TV was sold to the Annenberg family's Triangle Publications. In 1969, then-Governor of Pennsylvania Milton J. Shapp accused Triangle of using its three Pennsylvania television stations--WFBG-TV, WFIL-TV in Philadelphia (now WPVI-TV) and WLYH-TV in Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania)--to conduct a smear campaign against him. The FCC found that the charges were true, and forced Triangle to unload all of its broadcasting properties. WFBG-TV was among the last to be sold, going to Gateway Communications in October 1972 along with sister station WLYH. The radio stations weren't included in the sale because the FCC had barred common ownership of radio and television stations in all but a few cases a few months before the Shapp case. Accordingly, Gateway changed channel 10's call letters to the present-day '''WTAJ-TV''' (which stands for '''W'''e're '''T'''elevision for '''A'''ltoona and '''J'''ohnstown). The new calls were chosen to acknowledge channel 10's large viewership in Johnstown. Until 1982, Johnstown and Altoona State College were separate markets. Although Johnstown had a CBS affiliate of its own, WJNL-TV (channel 19), channel 10 had long claimed Johnstown as part of its primary coverage area; it provided a strong city-grade signal to almost the entire Johnstown market. Until the mid-1980s, it was also available on many cable systems in the Pittsburgh area because Pittsburgh's CBS affiliate, KDKA-TV, preempted a decent amount of CBS shows and most of the preempted shows aired on WTAJ. - 39. Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania)-Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania)-Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania)-York (York, Pennsylvania) '''WHP-DT2 (WHP-TV)''' 21.2 1 2006 New digital subchannel Newport Television airdate October 25, 1953 (1953 in television) location Lancaster (Lancaster, Pennsylvania) Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania) Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) York, Pennsylvania callsign_meaning '''W'''e're '''L'''ebanon (or '''L'''ancaster) '''Y'''ork '''H'''arrisburg The station signed-on October 25, 1953 (1953 in television) as an Independent (Independent station (North America)) with the call sign '''WLBR-TV'''. Licensed to Lebanon (Lebanon, Pennsylvania), it aired an analog signal on UHF channel 15 from a one kW (kilowatt) transmitter and 572 foot tower just north of Mount Gretna (Mount Gretna, Pennsylvania). The station was originally owned by the Lebanon Television Corporation formed by the Lebanon Broadcasting Company (WLBR radio (WLBR)) and the Lebanon News Publishing Company (''Lebanon Daily News''). In October 1954 after a power failure caused by Hurricane Hazel, the station went dark (Dark (broadcasting)). He was born in Lebanon, Pennsylvania to Jonathan and Verda (McGill) Brightbill and attended Pennsylvania Military College for two years before graduating from Pennsylvania State University in 1964. He went on to obtain a law degree at Duquesne University School of Law in 1970. Prior to being elected to the Senate in 1982, he served as Lebanon County District Attorney from 1977 to 1981. He was elected Majority Whip in 1989 and 1997 by the Republican caucus and became the Majority Leader in 2001 after Senator Joseph Loeper resigned in December 2000. Pennsylvania Manual: Floor Leaders


film documentary

). '''''Jim in Bold''''' is a documentary (Documentary film) about Jim


world award

American and as a standby on Broadway (Broadway theatre) in ''The Girl in the Freudian Slip'' (1967). She made her Broadway debut in ''Johnny No-Trump'' in 1967, and next appeared as George M. Cohan's sister opposite Joel Grey in ''George M!'' (1968), winning the Theatre World Award. In 1763, together with his brothers John Peter Gabriel (John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg) and Gotthilf Henry Ernst (Gotthilf Henry Ernst Muhlenberg), he attended


show featured

date January 2011 the show featured the Wertz Candy Shop. TV.com episode recap In 2010, an independent film drama ''Lebanon, PA (Lebanon, PA (film))'' was made. While the movie was set in Lebanon, all filming was done in other parts of Pennsylvania. Lebanon, Pennsylvania, is named after the ancient Middle East ern nation of Lebanon

Lebanon, Pennsylvania

'''Lebanon''', formerly known as '''Steitztown''', Lebanon: About Lebanon is a city in and the county seat of Lebanon County (Lebanon County, Pennsylvania), Pennsylvania, United States. west of Reading (Reading, Pennsylvania).

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