Later Yan

What is Later Yan known for?


title quot

of Northern Wei (386-409) Original from the University of California and was said to have settled down in Shangdang Commandery (上黨, roughly modern Changzhi, Shanxi) in the aftermaths of the conquest of the northern half of Jin (Jin Dynasty (265-420)) during the reign of Emperor Huai of Jin by Han Zhao. Feng Ba's father Feng An (馮安) later served the Western Yan emperor Murong Yong as a general. When Western Yan was destroyed by the Later Yan emperor Murong Chui in 394, Feng An's household was forcibly moved to Helong (和龍, also known as Longcheng (龍城), in modern Jinzhou, Liaoning), where Feng Ba grew up, apparently under heavy Xianbei influence, for his nickname Qizhifa suggested Xianbei origin. He had three younger brothers, all of whom admired heroic behavior and largely ignored social restraints, but Feng Ba himself was considered to be careful and diligent, managing his household well. During Murong Bao's reign, he became a general. He came to respect Murong Bao's adoptive son Murong Yun (Gao Yun (Northern Yan)) the Duke of Zhaoyang, and they became great friends.


398

year_leader1 384-396 year_leader2 396-398 year_leader3 398 year_leader4 398-401 year_leader5 401-407 year_leader6 407-409 title_leader Emperor representative1 representative2 representative3 representative4 year_representative1 year_representative2

Chuí 384-396 Yanwang (燕王 Yànwáng) 384-386 Jianxing (建興 Jiànxīng) 386-396 - Liezong (烈宗 Lièzōng) Huimin (惠愍 Huìmǐn) 慕容寶 Mùróng Bǎo (Murong Bao) 396-398 Yongkang (永康 Yǒngkāng) 396-398 - Unknown Unknown 蘭汗 兰汗 Lán Hàn (Lan Han) 398 Qinglong (青龍 青龙 Qīnglóng) 398 - Zhongzong (中宗 Zhōngzōng) Zhaowu (昭武 Zhāowǔ) 慕容盛 Mùróng Shèng (Murong Sheng) 398-401 Jianping (建平 Jiànpíng) 398 Changle (長樂 Chánglè) 399-401 br>

of the Xianbei state Later Yan (b. 373) * Empress Yang (Empress Yang (Ling)), wife of Lü Zuan * Jin Xiaowudi (Emperor Xiaowu of Jin), emperor of the Eastern Jin Dynasty (Jin Dynasty (265-420)) (b. 362) * Murong Chui, general and founder of Later Yan (b. 326) * Fan Tai, Chinese general during the Jin Dynasty (Jin Dynasty (265-420)) (d. 428) * Murong Bao, emperor of the Xianbei state Later Yan (d. 398) * Alaric I, king


abilities

who later became the founding emperor of Later Yan. He was a controversial figure in Chinese history, as his military abilities were plain, but as he was forced to flee Former Yan due to the jealousies of the regent Murong Ping, he was taken in and trusted by the Former Qin emperor Fu Jiān, but later betrayed him and established Later Yan, leading to a reputation of him as a traitor. Further, his reputation was damaged in that soon after his death, the Later Yan state

), was a general and imperial prince of the Chinese (History of China) Xianbei state Later Yan. He was a son of the founding emperor Murong Chui (Emperor Wucheng) and a brother of Murong Bao (Emperor Huimin). Throughout most of the state's history, he was admired by the people and officials alike for his military and governance abilities, but his inexplicable failures in 398 helped to lead to the downfall of himself, his brother Murong Bao, and the Later Yan state. During

with the Later Yan vassal Northern Wei's prince Tuoba Gui (Emperor Daowu of Northern Wei), fight the Xiongnu chieftain Liu Xian (劉顯) and later other rebels that threatened Tuoba Gui's safety. It was in 391 when he saw Tuoba Gui's abilities, and he recommended to Murong Chui to force Tuoba Gui to take up residence at the Later Yan capital Zhongshan (中山, in modern Baoding, Hebei) and entrust Northern Wei to a brother. Murong Chui refused. '''Murong Hui''' (慕容會) (373–397) was a general


arts long

into the most prosperous state of civilization seen in the world, which saw extravagant palaces, architecture, music, literature, and fine arts, long before Europe was in the Dark Ages (Dark Ages (historiography)). The Khitans who founded the subsequent Liao Dynasty (916-1125) and the Mongols who founded the Yuan Dynasty (1271–1368) in China proper also derived their ancestries from the Xianbei. Through these extensive political establishments, the Xianbei who entered


historical view

book_result&ct result&resnum 1&ved 0CC0Q6AEwAA '''Empress Li''' (李皇后, personal name unknown) (died 409?) was an empress whose husband Gao Yun (Gao Yun (Northern Yan)) (Emperor Huiyi) is considered, depending on which historical view is involved, to have been either the last emperor of the Chinese (History of China) Xianbei state Later Yan or the first emperor of Later Yan's successor state Northern Yan. Early life Tuoba Si


394

was succeeded in 246 by his son Muyan (木延) who also aided the Cao Wei campaign against the Goguryeo that same year. The Former Yan (337-370), Western Yan (384-394), Later Yan (384-409) dynasties as well as the Tuyuhun Kingdom (285-670) were all later founded by the Murong. The Tuoba (Tabgach) tribe started their rise with Tuoba Liwei (219-277) who was the ancestor of the future Northern Wei Dynasty and was thus posthumously honored as Emperor Shenyuan

a Mongol name (meaning 'rich') and title. The Göktürks relentlessly pursued the Rouran (whose subjects they formerly were) west all the way to Crimea in the 550's-570's. During the Sixteen Kingdoms (304-439) period, the Xianbei founded six kingdoms in China proper, including the Former Yan (281-370), Western Yan (384-394), Later Yan (384-407), Southern Yan (398-410), Western Qin (385-430) and Southern Liang (397-414). Most of them were unified by the Tuoba

the Former Yan (281-370), Western Yan (384-394), Later Yan (383-407), Southern Yan (398-410), Western Qin (385-430) and Southern Liang (397-414). Most of them were unified by the Tuoba Xianbei, who established the Northern Wei (386-535), which was the first of the Northern Dynasties (386-581) founded by the Xianbei. Ma, Changshou 馬長壽 (1962). Wuhuan yu Xianbei Wuhuan and Xianbei 烏桓與鮮卑. Shanghai 上海 , Shanghai ren min chu ban she Shanghai People's


military abilities

who later became the founding emperor of Later Yan. He was a controversial figure in Chinese history, as his military abilities were plain, but as he was forced to flee Former Yan due to the jealousies of the regent Murong Ping, he was taken in and trusted by the Former Qin emperor Fu Jiān, but later betrayed him and established Later Yan, leading to a reputation of him as a traitor. Further, his reputation was damaged in that soon after his death, the Later Yan state


extreme political

; 384-394) was a state (Sovereign state) of Xianbei ethnicity during the era of Sixteen Kingdoms in China. It was founded by Murong Hong in 384 in the aftermaths of Former Qin's defeat by Jin Dynasty (265-420) at the Battle of Fei River, with the stated intent of permitting the Xianbei, whom Former Qin's emperor Fu Jiān had relocated to Former Qin's capital region after destroying Former Yan in 370. It initially also was intended to rescue the last Former Yan emperor Murong Wei, until he was executed by Fu Jiān in 385. It was a state that was characterized by extreme political instability and internal fighting, as all seven of its rulers (during a short span of 10 years) died of unnatural causes. After eviscerating Former Qin, the people of the state abandoned the Guanzhong region and headed east back toward their homeland, but eventually settled down in modern Shanxi. It was destroyed in 394 as Later Yan's emperor Murong Chui wanted to reunite the people formerly of Yan and conquered it. Legacy The area of today's Ding County was part of the Zhongshan (Zhongshan Commandery) Commandery (Commandery (China)) during the Han Dynasty. The commandery capital, Zhongshan (Zhongshan, Hebei), was an economic center from the Eastern Han Dynasty until the Tang Dynasty. It was the capital of Later Yan during the reign of its first emperor, Murong Chui. In the 1970s, the tomb of King Cuo was excavated. ** '''Later Qin''' - Yao Xing, Emperor of Later Qin (Later Qin) (394-416) ** '''Later Yan''' - Murong Sheng, Emperor of Later Yan (Later Yan) (398-401) ** '''Northern Liang''' - Duan Ye, Prince of Northern Liang (Northern Liang) (397-401) ** '''Later Qin''' - Yao Xing, Emperor of Later Qin (Later Qin) (394-416) ** '''Later Yan''' - Murong Sheng, Emperor of Later Yan (Later Yan) (398-401) ** '''Northern Liang''' - Duan Ye, Prince of Northern Liang (Northern Liang) (397-401) Northwestern campaign At the time China was invaded by five foreign races (Wu Hu) and divided into Sixteen Kingdoms. Later Yan Dynasty, which was based on present-day Liaoning Province, was defeated so heavily by Gwanggaeto the Great's forces and finally came to an end in 408. After the fall of Later Yan, Han Chinese drove Murong clan of Xianbei northward and established Northern Yan Kingdom in the area. However, Northern Yan was no match for Xianbei Northern Wei Dynasty, which unified most of northern China. Then Northern Yan began to seek alliances with Goguryeo, which had greater power than itself and which also can fight equally against Northern Wei. In 436 Goguryeo cavalry arrived in Northern Yan and eventually drove Xianbeis away. History Chaoyang has a long and rich history. The discovery of the over five thousand year old Niuheliang Hongshan Cultural Ruins in the region has drawn attention to Chaoyang as one of the birthplaces of ancient Chinese culture.


396

year_leader1 384-396 year_leader2 396-398 year_leader3 398 year_leader4 398-401 year_leader5 401-407 year_leader6 407-409 title_leader Emperor representative1 representative2 representative3 representative4 year_representative1 year_representative2

Chuí 384-396 Yanwang (燕王 Yànwáng) 384-386 Jianxing (建興 Jiànxīng) 386-396 - Liezong (烈宗 Lièzōng) Huimin (惠愍 Huìmǐn) 慕容寶 Mùróng Bǎo (Murong Bao) 396-398 Yongkang (永康 Yǒngkāng) 396-398 - Unknown Unknown 蘭汗 兰汗 Lán Hàn (Lan Han) 398 Qinglong (青龍 青龙 Qīnglóng) 398 - Zhongzong (中宗 Zhōngzōng) Zhaowu (昭武 Zhāowǔ) 慕容盛 Mùróng Shèng (Murong Sheng) 398-401 Jianping (建平 Jiànpíng) 398 Changle (長樂 Chánglè) 399-401 br>

of the Visigoths (d. 410) * Murong Hui (Murong Hui (Later Yan)), imperial prince of the Xianbei state Later Yan (d. 397) * Murong Sheng, emperor of the Xianbei state Later Yan (d. 401) * Constantius Gallus, Caesar (Caesar (title)) and son of Julius Constantius (d. 354) * Murong Chui, general and founder of Later Yan (d. 396) thumb left 1500-year-old iron lion in Cangzhou (File:IronLion.jpg) After the invasions of northern nomadic peoples at the end


founding

who later became the founding emperor of Later Yan. He was a controversial figure in Chinese history, as his military abilities were plain, but as he was forced to flee Former Yan due to the jealousies of the regent Murong Ping, he was taken in and trusted by the Former Qin emperor Fu Jiān, but later betrayed him and established Later Yan, leading to a reputation of him as a traitor. Further, his reputation was damaged in that soon after his death, the Later Yan state

of the Chinese (History of China) Xianbei state Later Yan. Her husband was the state's founding emperor, Murong Chui (Emperor Wucheng). Her name is actually lost to history, but her courtesy name Yuanfei was recorded and used by historians. She was the niece of two of Murong Chui's prior wives, who were daughters of the Xianbei chief Duan Mopei (段末怌). Her father Duan Yi (段儀) was a brother of the Princesses Duan. Early reign: establishment of Later Qin as regional power

Tuoba Gui , Later Qin sent a relief force to aid Northern Wei, although Later Qin forces did not actually engage Later Yan. Further, in 397, with Later Yan under heavy attack by Northern Wei after its founding emperor Murong Chui died and was replaced by Murong Bao, Later Qin refused to provide aid to Later Yan. '''Wei''' ( ) was a state of Dingling ethnicity that existed during China (History of China)'s Sixteen Kingdoms period—specifically, from 388

Later Yan

The '''Later Yan''' ( ; 384-407 or 409) was a Murong–Xianbei state, located in modern-day northeast China, during the era of Sixteen Kingdoms in China.

All rulers of the Later Yan declared themselves "emperors (Chinese nobility)".

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