Languedoc

What is Languedoc known for?


past century

, with France accounting for 45%, Spain 35%, Italy 20%, and small amounts from Slovenia, Croatia and the Australian states of Tasmania and Western Australia (see below (#In New Zealand and Australia)). In 1937, France produced around 1,000 metric tonnes (1,100 short tons) of under vines and is the single biggest wine-producing region (List of wine-producing regions) in the world, being responsible for more than a third of France's total wine production. K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 293 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 As recently as 2001, the region produced more wine than the entire United States (American wine). K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 294 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 Nicetas then went on to Languedoc. In 1167 in the presence of Mark and other representatives of Cathar churches in Languedoc, France and Catalonia, Nicetas presided over the Council of Saint-Félix at which he renewed the ''consolamenta'' and confirmed the episcopal office of six Cathar bishops: Most well known as a painter, his bold, arguably brutal depictions of the South Wales valleys are his most powerful legacy. ‘Pithead Funeral’, a response to the Aberfan disaster that affected him so deeply, stands out amongst his work together with 'Fallen Figure' (opposite). Also the series of miner’s paintings produced following the week he spent sketching underground in a Welsh (Wales) coal mine. In sharp contrast are the paintings and drawings produced as a result of the considerable time he spent in the Languedoc region of France.


century historic

province de Languedoc, de l'époque romaine à nos jours , by Élie Pélaquier, CNRS. under vines and is the single biggest wine-producing region (List of wine-producing regions) in the world, being responsible for more than a third of France's total wine production. K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 293 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 As recently as 2001, the region produced more wine than the entire United States (American wine). K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 294 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 Nicetas then went on to Languedoc. In 1167 in the presence of Mark and other representatives of Cathar churches in Languedoc, France and Catalonia, Nicetas presided over the Council of Saint-Félix at which he renewed the ''consolamenta'' and confirmed the episcopal office of six Cathar bishops: Most well known as a painter, his bold, arguably brutal depictions of the South Wales valleys are his most powerful legacy. ‘Pithead Funeral’, a response to the Aberfan disaster that affected him so deeply, stands out amongst his work together with 'Fallen Figure' (opposite). Also the series of miner’s paintings produced following the week he spent sketching underground in a Welsh (Wales) coal mine. In sharp contrast are the paintings and drawings produced as a result of the considerable time he spent in the Languedoc region of France.


white lead

taught the theories of Antoine Lavoisier. The capital he acquired by the death of a wealthy uncle was employed in the establishment of chemical works for the manufacture (Manufacturing) of the mineral acids, alum, white-lead (Cerussite), soda (Sodium) and other substances. Then came the Jubilee (Jubilee (Christian)) year of 1300, that filled Rome with the fervent masses of pilgrims and made up for the lack of French gold in the treasury. The following year, Philip's ministers


studies series

Languedoc, by Gregg Stern, Routledge Jewish Studies Series '''Catharism''' (from was a name given to a Christian religious movement with dualistic (dualism) and gnostic (gnosticism) elements that appeared in the Languedoc region of France and other parts of Europe in the 11th century and flourished in the 12th and 13th centuries. The movement was extinguished in the early decades


long+famous

works at Trévoux were long famous, and the college at Thoissey was well endowed and influential. The French, though Louis XIII of France and Cardinal Richelieu were concerned at home with Huguenot uprisings in Languedoc after the fall of La Rochelle in 1628, sent forces to relieve Casale near the border with Milanese territory, besieged by a Habsburg army from Milan. Richelieu's address to the King, December 1628. The French forces crossed the Alps in March 1629, forced Susa (Susa (TO)) in Piedmont, on 6 March, delivered the siege of Casale on 18 March and took the fortress of Pinerolo on 30 March. In April, the Treaty of Susa was signed with the Duke of Savoy, whereupon they returned to France, leaving behind a small garrison. The papal envoy in negotiations at Casale was Jules Mazarin. Life Gaussen was born at Geneva. His father, Georg Markus Gaussen, a member of the Council of Two Hundred, was descended from an old Languedoc family which had been scattered at the time of the religious persecutions in France. At the close of his university career at Geneva, Louis was in 1816 appointed pastor of the Swiss Reformed Church at Satigny near Geneva, where he formed a close relationship with J. E. Cellrier, who had preceded him in the pastorate, and also with the members of the dissenting congregation at Bourg-de-Four, which, together with the ''Église du témoignage'', had been formed under the influence of the preaching of James (James Alexander Haldane) and Robert Haldane in 1817. The Swiss revival (Réveil) was distasteful to the pastors of Geneva (''Venérable Compagnie des Pasteurs''), and on 7 May 1817 they passed an ordinance hostile to it. He fought at the Battle of Patay in 1429. That year he married Eleanor of Bourbon-La Marche, daughter and ultimately heir of James II, Count of La Marche. He served as lieutenant-general in La Marche and governor of Limousin (Limousin (province)) in 1441, and later as lieutenant-general of Languedoc and Roussillon in 1461. Geography Frontignan is located in the Languedoc coastal plain between the towns of Sète and Montpellier. under vines and is the single biggest wine-producing region (List of wine-producing regions) in the world, being responsible for more than a third of France's total wine production. K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 293 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 As recently as 2001, the region produced more wine than the entire United States (American wine). K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 294 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 Nicetas then went on to Languedoc. In 1167 in the presence of Mark and other representatives of Cathar churches in Languedoc, France and Catalonia, Nicetas presided over the Council of Saint-Félix at which he renewed the ''consolamenta'' and confirmed the episcopal office of six Cathar bishops: Most well known as a painter, his bold, arguably brutal depictions of the South Wales valleys are his most powerful legacy. ‘Pithead Funeral’, a response to the Aberfan disaster that affected him so deeply, stands out amongst his work together with 'Fallen Figure' (opposite). Also the series of miner’s paintings produced following the week he spent sketching underground in a Welsh (Wales) coal mine. In sharp contrast are the paintings and drawings produced as a result of the considerable time he spent in the Languedoc region of France.


quot violent

of the Mediterranean around the Camargue region. The ''Petit Larousse Illustre (1997) ,'' defines Mistral as "Vent violent, froid, turbulent et sec qui souffle du secteur nord" (Violent, cold, turbulent and dry wind which blows from the north)." See also definition of Meteo France on their website and the U.S. Navy Marine Meteorology site, which describe the mistral as a strong, cold northwesterly wind It affects the northeast of the plain of Languedoc


international role

region , the largest region in metropolitan France. It is also the capital of the Haute-Garonne department (Departements of France). During his time as mayor, Toulouse's economy and population boomed. He tried to strengthen the international role of Toulouse (such as its Airbus operations), as well as revive the cultural heritage of the city. The Occitan cross, flag of Languedoc and symbol of the counts of Toulouse, was chosen as the new flag of the city, instead of the traditional


quot architectural

;Como-Pavian" architectural sculpture is recognized in the cathedral of Modena and its Torre della Ghirlandina, William Montorsi, ''La torre della Ghirlandina: Comacini e Campionesi a Modena''. in central The ''Casa del Maestri Comacini'' is still shown to tourists in Assisi. and southern Italy, west across Languedoc to Iberian Peninsula, across southern Germany as far as Hungary, and even in England. Serra 1969:353. . Terminology varies regionally. When used as field boundaries, dry stone structures often are known as dykes, particularly in Scotland. Dry stone walls are characteristic of upland areas of Britain (Great Britain) and Ireland where rock outcrops naturally or large stones exist in quantity in the soil. They are especially abundant in the West of Ireland, particularly Connemara. They also may be found throughout the Mediterranean, as in the Balearic Islands, Catalonia, València, Languedoc, Provence, Liguria, the Apulia region of Italy, Croatia, Cyprus, and in the Canary Islands, including retaining walls used for terracing. Such constructions are common where large stones are plentiful (for example, in The Burren) or conditions are too harsh for hedges capable of retaining livestock to be grown as reliable field boundaries. Many thousands of miles of such walls exist, most of them centuries old. * Circa 3200 BC: Constructions in Malta (Ħaġar Qim and Tarxien). * Circa 3000 BC: Constructions in France (Saumur, Dordogne, Languedoc, Biscay, and the Mediterranean coast), Spain (Los Millares), Sicily, Belgium (Ardennes), and Orkney, as well as the first henges (circular earthworks) in Britain (Great Britain). * Circa 2800 BC: Climax of the megalithic Funnel-beaker culture (Funnelbeaker culture) in Denmark, and the construction of the henge at Stonehenge. Early life Born in Saint-Pierre-de-Nogaret, Lozère, as the son of an apothecary, he studied chemistry at the University of Montpellier, obtaining his doctorate in 1777, when he settled in Paris. In 1781 the States (Estates of the realm) of Languedoc founded a chair of chemistry for him at the school of medicine in Montpellier, where he taught the theories of Antoine Lavoisier. The capital he acquired by the death of a wealthy uncle was employed in the establishment of chemical works for the manufacture (Manufacturing) of the mineral acids, alum, white-lead (Cerussite), soda (Sodium) and other substances. Then came the Jubilee (Jubilee (Christian)) year of 1300, that filled Rome with the fervent masses of pilgrims and made up for the lack of French gold in the treasury. The following year, Philip's ministers overstepped their bounds. Bernard Saisset, the Bishop of Pamiers in Foix, the farthest southern march (Marches) of Languedoc was recalcitrant and difficult. There was no love between the south, that had suffered so recently with the Albigensian Crusade, and the Frankish north. Pamiers was one of the last strongholds of the Cathars. Saisset made no secret of his disrespect for the King of France. Philip's ministry decided to make an example of the bishop. He was brought before Philip and his court, on 24 October 1301, where the chancellor, Pierre Flotte, charged him with high treason, and he was placed in the keeping of the archbishop of Narbonne, his metropolitan. Before they could attack him in the courts, the royal ministry needed the Pope to remove him from his See and strip him of his clerical protections, so that he could be tried for treason. Philip IV tried to obtain from the pope this "canonical degradation". Instead, Boniface ordered the king in December 1301 to free the bishop to go to Rome to justify himself. In the Bull, ''Ausculta Fili'' ("Give ear, my son") he accused Philip of sinfully subverting the Church in France, and not in terms that were conciliatory: History The Gallic settlement on a rocky peak over the Rhône (Rhône River) river was called ''Bergoiata''. Bourg-Saint-Andéol has one of the very rare testimonies of post-roman and pre-Christian religions with its sculpted ''bas relief'' of God Mithra. It acquired its present name after Saint Andeolus, the 'apostle of the Vivarais', a disciple of St. Polycarp, supposedly arriving from Minor Asia, who evangelized the area under Emperor Septimius Severus, and was martyred in 208. The region was named ''Helvia'' in Julius Caesar's ''De Bello Gallico'', with Alba-la-Romaine as capital city, then Vivarais from the mediaeval times after the see of Viviers, a region of Languedoc province during Ancient Regime until ''département (Departments of France)s'' were created at the French Revolution. Due to the citizen's engagement for the Revolution, the town's name rejected a while the quite whimmy saint and was named ''Bourg-sur-Rhône''. (At the Napoleonic times, Andéol had already been brought in back...) * thumb 300px The Roman Province of Gallia Narbonensis in 20 BC (File:GalliaNarbonensis En.jpg) '''Gallia Narbonensis''' ( under vines and is the single biggest wine-producing region (List of wine-producing regions) in the world, being responsible for more than a third of France's total wine production. K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 293 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 As recently as 2001, the region produced more wine than the entire United States (American wine). K. MacNeil ''The Wine Bible'' pg 294 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345 Nicetas then went on to Languedoc. In 1167 in the presence of Mark and other representatives of Cathar churches in Languedoc, France and Catalonia, Nicetas presided over the Council of Saint-Félix at which he renewed the ''consolamenta'' and confirmed the episcopal office of six Cathar bishops: Most well known as a painter, his bold, arguably brutal depictions of the South Wales valleys are his most powerful legacy. ‘Pithead Funeral’, a response to the Aberfan disaster that affected him so deeply, stands out amongst his work together with 'Fallen Figure' (opposite). Also the series of miner’s paintings produced following the week he spent sketching underground in a Welsh (Wales) coal mine. In sharp contrast are the paintings and drawings produced as a result of the considerable time he spent in the Languedoc region of France.


education promotion

and with Iraq's president in Paris in 2009. She and Sheikha Mozah (wife of Emir of Qatar) will be working together on the topic of education promotion. Bruni visited Doha on invitation of Sheikha Mozah in November 2009. Doha, first official visit to Qatar – Carla Bruni-Sarkozy official Website She also took cause for a woman in Iran, Sakineh Mohammadi


syphilis

influence of the Italian improvisational Commedia dell'arte, and displayed his talent for mockery. In the course of his travels he met Armand, Prince of Conti, the governor of Languedoc, who became his patron, and named his company after him. This friendship later ended when Conti, having contracted syphilis from a courtesan, attempted to cure himself by reconciling himself with religion. Conti's religious advisor counseled him against maintaining actors and encouraged him to join

Languedoc

'''Languedoc''' ( ) is a former province of France, now continued in the modern-day ''régions'' (List of regions in France) of Languedoc-Roussillon and Midi-Pyrénées in the south of France, and whose capital city was Toulouse, now in Midi-Pyrénées. It had an area of approximately 27,376 square kilometers.

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