Lalibela

What is Lalibela known for?


significant fact

decorative details" (hardly surprising given the theological, ecclesiastical, and cultural links between the Ethiopian Orthodox (Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church) and Coptic Orthodox Churches (Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria)), he is adamant about the native origins of these creations: "But the significant fact is remains that the rock-churches continue to follow the style of the local built-up prototypes, which themselves retain clear evidence of their basically Axumite


high place

, 1961), p. 226. Beckingham and Huntingford add an appendix which discuss Alvarez's description of these churches, pp. 526-42. thumbnail Priest of rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela, a high place of Ethiopian Christianity, still today a place of pilmigrage and devotion. Lalibela, Ethiopia (File:Priest of rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela, a high place of Ethiopian Christianity, still today a place of pilmigrage and devotion..jpg) Although Ramuso included plans


religious tradition

of wonder and religious tradition" by Rudi Bakhtiar, CNN Student News, November 28, 2001. (Church of Saint George, Lalibela) * The stelae (Obelisk of Axum) of Axum, Ethiopia WikiPedia:Lalibela Commons:Lalibela


fine views

areas: :'''Shimbrima''' at the ''north''-western end of Adebabay St, many with stunning escarpment views and a gentle climb to the economic centre of town and a steeper descent to the church complexes :'''Getergie''' at the ''south''-western end of town, on and off Getergie Rd and without the stunning escarpment views (but still with fine views of the surrounding buttes and mesas) but still a long way to the bus station on the eastern side of town. Hotels in this district have both a steep climb to the church complexes and then an equally steep climb to the economic centre of town. However, maybe it's better to stagger downhill to your bed after a day's sightseeing? For those arriving by bus, this very basic hotel may save them both some dosh and a long uphill hike to the town proper: * WikiPedia:Lalibela Commons:Lalibela


architecture+rock

elevation_ft postal_code_type postal_code area_code website footnotes '''Lalibela''' is a town in northern Ethiopia that is famous for its 11 monolithic (monolithic church) rock-cut (Rock-cut architecture) churches. Lalibela is one of Ethiopia's holiest cities, second only to Aksum, and is a center of pilgrimage for much of the country. Unlike Aksum, the population of Lalibela is almost completely Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church Ethiopian Orthodox

of the rock-hewn (Rock cut architecture) churches of Lalibela in Ethiopia. In 1966 Gray secured the support of philanthropist Lila Acheson Wallace (1889-1984), who offered $150,000 to the ''International Fund for Monuments'' and UNESCO for this project. The project continued until the Communist overthrow of Haile Selassie I and the subsequent expulsion of foreigners from Ethiopia. After Ethopia, Gray's interests shifted to Easter Island Easter Island (Rapa Nui


classical architecture'

right View of Tigray from Emperor Yohannes' Palace A distinctive feature of Tigray are its rock-hewn churches. Similar in design to those of Lalibela, these churches are found in four or five clusters—Gheralta, Teka-Tesfay, Atsbi and Tembien -- with Wukro sometimes included. Some of the churches are considered earlier than those of Lalibela, perhaps dating from the eighth century. Mostly monolithic (monolithic architecture), with designs partly inspired by classical architecture, they are often located at the top of cliffs or steep hills, for security. For example, Tigray's ancient Debre Damo monastery is accessible only by climbing a rope 25 meters up a sheer cliff. WikiPedia:Lalibela Commons:Lalibela


classical architecture

right View of Tigray from Emperor Yohannes' Palace A distinctive feature of Tigray are its rock-hewn churches. Similar in design to those of Lalibela, these churches are found in four or five clusters—Gheralta, Teka-Tesfay, Atsbi and Tembien -- with Wukro sometimes included. Some of the churches are considered earlier than those of Lalibela, perhaps dating from the eighth century. Mostly monolithic (monolithic architecture), with designs partly inspired by classical architecture, they are often located at the top of cliffs or steep hills, for security. For example, Tigray's ancient Debre Damo monastery is accessible only by climbing a rope 25 meters up a sheer cliff. WikiPedia:Lalibela Commons:Lalibela


amazing concentration

the ground up. History Since the town, first called '''Roha''', was founded by the eponymous King Gebre Mesqel Lalibela of the Zagwe dynasty more than 900 years ago as the "new Jerusalem", the later-renamed Lalibela has been a major ecclesiastical centre of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church and a place of pilgrimage to its amazing concentration of rock-hewn churches. Pious Ethiopians often walk hundreds of kilometres in bare feet from all over Ethiopia to receive blessings


fine views

areas: :'''Shimbrima''' at the ''north''-western end of Adebabay St, many with stunning escarpment views and a gentle climb to the economic centre of town and a steeper descent to the church complexes :'''Getergie''' at the ''south''-western end of town, on and off Getergie Rd and without the stunning escarpment views (but still with fine views of the surrounding buttes and mesas) but still a long way to the bus station on the eastern side of town. Hotels in this district have both a steep climb to the church complexes and then an equally steep climb to the economic centre of town. However, maybe it's better to stagger downhill to your bed after a day's sightseeing? For those arriving by bus, this very basic hotel may save them both some dosh and a long uphill hike to the town proper: * WikiPedia:Lalibela Commons:Lalibela


traditional cover

restaurant set in a mature garden in the commercial centre of town is circular, with a giant 10m diameter weaving forming the ceiling and making you feel like you are under the giant traditional cover of a ''mittad'' cooking ''injera''! Drink * WikiPedia:Lalibela Commons:Lalibela

Lalibela

'''Lalibela''' is a town in northern Ethiopia that is famous for its 11 monolithic (monolithic church) rock-cut (Rock-cut architecture) churches. Lalibela is one of Ethiopia's holiest cities, second only to Aksum, and is a center of pilgrimage for much of the country. Unlike Aksum, the population of Lalibela is almost completely Ethiopian Orthodox Christian (Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church). The layout and names of the major buildings in Lalibela are widely accepted, especially by the local clergy, to be a symbolic representation of Jerusalem. David W. Phillipson, ''Ancient Churches of Ethiopia'' (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009), p. 181 This has led some experts to date the current form of its churches to the years following the capture of Jerusalem in 1187 by the Muslim soldier Saladin. Phillipson, ''Ancient Churches'', p. 179

Lalibela is located in the Semien Wollo Zone of the Amhara (Amhara Region) ethnic division (Regions of Ethiopia) (or ''kilil'') at roughly 2,500 meters above sea level. It is the main town in Lasta (Lasta (woreda)) woreda, which was formerly part of Bugna woreda.

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