Kyrgyzstan

What is Kyrgyzstan known for?


cultural role

берген? ) is a pass (mountain pass) in the Tian Shan mountain range on the border between the Naryn Province of Kyrgyzstan and the Xinjiang Autonomous Region (Xinjiang) of China (People's Republic of China). Cultural role The capital of Kyrgyzstan, Bishkek, is named after the paddle used to churn the fermenting milk, showing the importance of the drink in the national culture. '''European route E&nbsp


blue+high

, crystal blue high alpine lake up in the Tian Shan Mountains. * Lake Song Kul — Issyk Kul's little cousin, far more remote, and many would say more beautiful as well. * Lake Kul Ukuk * The caravanserai of Tash Rabat (Naryn#See) — a well-preserved 15th century stone caravanserai near Naryn. * Burana Tower (Tokmok#See) — all that remains of the ancient Silk Road capital of Balasagun, a massive minaret standing alone on the step. * Ala Archa National


related training

of individuals per month receive free-of-charge access to the Internet as well as to a wide variety of computer-related training programs. IATP access sites are located in the countries of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia (Georgia (country)), Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. This edition of the Asian Games saw two additions. One is the addition of the return of Cambodia, surviving years of civil strife


making sense

of people capable of organising knowledge and making sense of world events lies in tatters. "Tonight's top story: Old man is ill! By the way, there's also been a revolution in Kyrgyzstan." — Trilobite (User:Trilobite) (Talk) (User_talk:Trilobite) 19:41, 24 Mar 2005 (UTC) ** Isn't this limited to the US? Haven't heard about it in Danish media but there is an article on the BBC webpage. The article here is in a horrible state but I don't know if that would be a reason


previous period

) argues that this culture and its "new contributions" are "nevertheless in line with the cultural traditions of the previous period", and remarks that "to attribute a historical value to ... the slender links with northwestern Iran and northern Afghanistan ... is a mistake", since "it could well be the spread of particular objects and, as such, objects that could circulate more easily quite apart from any real contacts." Antonini (1973), Stacul and other scholars argue that this culture is not related with the Beshkent culture of Kyrgyzstan and Vakhsh culture of Tajikistan (Bryant 2001). However, E. Kuz'mina (Yelena_Yefimovna_Kuzmina), in her book ''"The origin of the Indo-Iranians, volume 3"'' (2007) argues the opposite on the basis of both archeology and the human remains from the sepultures. In addition to four locations in Turkey, regional editions are printed and distributed in Australia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Germany, Romania, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia), Turkmenistan, and the US (United States). Zaman bureaus and correspondents are located in major world capitals and cities like Washington DC, New York, Brussels, Moscow, Cairo, Baku, Frankfurt, Ashgabat, Tashkent, and Bucharest. '''Bayaman Erkinbayev''' (Баяман Эркинбаев, c. 1967 - September 22, 2005) was a top Kyrgyzstani lawmaker and parliamentary deputy, who was the driving force behind the riots in southern Kyrgyzstan that led to the overthrow of President Askar Akayev on March 24, 2005. One of the richest businessman in the country, he funded the Central Asian state's Socialist Party (Socialist Party (Kyrgyzstan)). He had announced his candidacy for the presidency in the July 2005 elections, but bowed down long before the vote, when his party supported former security chief and Bishkek mayor, Felix Kulov. '''Bayaman Erkinbayev''' (Баяман Эркинбаев, c. 1967 - September 22, 2005) was a top Kyrgyzstani lawmaker and parliamentary deputy, who was the driving force behind the riots in southern Kyrgyzstan that led to the overthrow of President Askar Akayev on March 24, 2005. One of the richest businessman in the country, he funded the Central Asian state's Socialist Party (Socialist Party (Kyrgyzstan)). He had announced his candidacy for the presidency in the July 2005 elections, but bowed down long before the vote, when his party supported former security chief and Bishkek mayor, Felix Kulov. * The parliament of Turkey grants amnesty to 677,000 people who have been expelled from university in recent years (BBC) * In Kyrgyzstan, thousands of people protest in support of opposition (Opposition (politics)) politicians who were barred from elections (BBC) * French (France) Finance Minister Hervé Gaymard faces increasing pressure to resign. He has been criticized due to the luxury apartment where he lives at the state's expense, although he has promised to move elsewhere. (Reuters) (Financial Times) Mahmud al-Kashgari's map (1072) Qarakhanid Uyghur (Uyghur people) scholar Mahmud al-Kashgari compiled a "Compendium of the languages of the Turks" in the 11th century. The manuscript is illustrated with a "Turkocentric" world map, oriented with east (or rather, perhaps, the direction of midsummer sunrise) on top, centered on the ancient city of Balasagun in what is now Kyrgyzstan, showing the Caspian Sea to the north, and Iraq, Azerbaijan, Yemen and Egypt to the west, China and Japan to the east, Hindustan, Kashmir, Gog and Magog to the south. Conventional symbols are used throughout- blue lines for rivers, red lines for mountain ranges etc. The world is shown as encircled by the ocean. 81 - The First Turkish World Map, by Kashgari (1072) « Strange Maps The map is now kept at the Pera Museum in Istanbul. By its 75th anniversary in 2007, IMA had trained over 46,000 officers commissioned into armies of the world, including Angola, Afghanistan, Bhutan, Burma, Ghana, Iraq, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Nepal, Nigeria, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Tonga, Uganda, Yemen and Zambia besides those of United Kingdom, Pakistan, Bangladesh and India. http: indianarmy.nic.in Site FormTemplete frmTempSimpleWithThreePara.aspx?MnId VYSGwIWTOjI &ParentID 2YOl+zJaUq0 Starting with 18 member states, soon all member states of the Council of Europe joined the Venice Commission and since 2002 non-European states can also become full members. Today, Commons:Category:Kyrgyzstan WikiPedia:Kyrgyzstan Dmoz:Regional Asia Kyrgyzstan


traditional national

Horse riding The traditional national sports reflect the importance of horse riding in Kyrgyz culture. Very popular, as in all of Central Asia, is ''Ulak Tartysh (Buzkashi)'', a team game (team sports) resembling a cross between polo and rugby (rugby football) in which two teams of riders wrestle for possession of the headless carcass of a goat, which they attempt to deliver across the opposition's goal line, or into the opposition's goal: a big tub or a circle marked

). Turkic peoples originally used their own alphabets, like Orkhon (Old Turkic alphabet) and Yenisey (Old Turkic alphabet) runiform, and later the Uyghur alphabet. The oldest inscription was found near the Issyk river in Kyrgyzstan. Traditional national and cultural symbols of the Turkic peoples include wolves (wolf) in Turkic mythology and tradition; as well as the color blue, iron, and fire. Turquoise blue, from the French (French language) word meaning "


including education

with the Soviet Union, the former intended to increase cooperation after the collapse, especially amongst the new Muslim majority nations. As Bangladesh have begun increasing production of pharmaceutical goods, melamine, garments and jute products other nations have become increasingly interested such as Kyrgyzstan whose Ambassador Orolbaeva Irina Abdyevna have said this could help strengthen bilateral ties. Other areas including education have been mentioned, with a demand of increasing educational


title participating

article.aspx?flag 1&pagenum 1&id 1269 The Kyrgyz national team took Kyrgyzstan's first medal at the Asian Winter Games, when they captured the bronze. http: info.astana-almaty2011.kz en Comp.mvc Info MedalList BAM400000 They played in the Bandy World Championship 2012, Commons:Category:Kyrgyzstan WikiPedia:Kyrgyzstan Dmoz:Regional Asia Kyrgyzstan


studies school

. It is the world’s first internationally chartered institution of higher education. The UCA currently operates a School of Professional and Continuing Education (University of Central Asia#School of Professional and Continuing Education) (SPCE) , with a School of Undergraduate Studies (University of Central Asia#School of Undergraduate Studies) and a University of Central Asia#Graduate School of Development Graduate School of Development

of Professional and Continuing Education (SPCE) , with a School of Undergraduate Studies (University_of_Central_Asia#School of Undergraduate Studies) and a Graduate School of Development (University_of_Central_Asia#Graduate School of Development) in the process of being established. The '''Chu''' (or '''Chui''' or '''Chuy''') ( ) is a river in northern Kyrgyzstan and southern


team game

Horse riding The traditional national sports reflect the importance of horse riding in Kyrgyz culture. Very popular, as in all of Central Asia, is ''Ulak Tartysh (Buzkashi)'', a team game (team sports) resembling a cross between polo and rugby (rugby football) in which two teams of riders wrestle for possession of the headless carcass of a goat, which they attempt to deliver across the opposition's goal line, or into the opposition's goal: a big tub or a circle marked on the ground. Other popular games on horseback include: * ''At Chabysh'' – a long-distance horse race, sometimes over a distance of more than 50 km * ''Jumby Atmai'' – a large bar of precious metal (the "jumby") is tied to a pole by a thread and contestants attempt to break the thread by shooting at it, while at a gallop * ''Kyz Kuumai'' – a man chases a girl in order to win a kiss from her, while she gallops away; if he is not successful she may in turn chase him and attempt to beat him with her "kamchi" (horsewhip) * ''Oodarysh'' – two contestants wrestle on horseback, each attempting to be the first to throw the other from his horse * ''Tyin Emmei'' – picking up a coin from the ground at full gallop thumb right Southern shore of Issyk Kul Lake (File:Issyk-Kulmeer.jpg). Public holidays Commons:Category:Kyrgyzstan WikiPedia:Kyrgyzstan Dmoz:Regional Asia Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyzstan

'''Kyrgyzstan''' ( Landlocked and mountainous, Kyrgyzstan is bordered by Kazakhstan to the north, Uzbekistan to the west, Tajikistan to the southwest and China to the east. Its capital (Capital city) and largest city (List of cities in Kyrgyzstan) is Bishkek.

Kyrgyzstan's history spans over 2,000 years and encompasses a wide variety of cultures and empires, including Persian, Mongol, Russian, and Soviet. Although geographically isolated by its highly mountainous terrain – which has allowed for the preservation of its ancient culture – Kyrgyzstan has historically been at the crossroads of several great civilizations, namely as part of the Silk Road and other commercial and cultural routes. Though long inhabited by a succession of independent tribes and clans, Kyrgyzstan has periodically come under foreign domination due to its strategic location, attaining sovereignty as a nation-state only after the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Since independence, Kyrgyzstan has officially been a unitary (Unitary state) parliamentary republic, although it continues to endure ethnic conflicts, Kyrgyzstan is a member of the Commonwealth of Independent States, the Eurasian Economic Union, the Collective Security Treaty Organization, the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation, the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, the Turkic Council, the TÜRKSOY community and the United Nations.

Ethnic Kyrgyz (Kyrgyz people) make up the majority of the country's 5.7 million people, followed by significant minorities of Uzbeks and Russians. The official language, Kyrgyz (Kyrgyz language), is closely related to the other Turkic languages, although Russian (Russian language) remains widely spoken, a legacy of Russification. The majority of the population (64 percent) are nondenominational Muslims. "Chapter 1: Religious Affiliation". The World's Muslims: Unity and Diversity. Pew Research Center's Religion & Public Life Project. August 9, 2012. Retrieved 4 September 2013

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