Knoxville, Tennessee

What is Knoxville, Tennessee known for?


year school

, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. The school employs over 1,300 instructional faculty, and offers more than 300 degree programs. UTK - About the University. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. Pellissippi State Community College is a two-year school governed by the Tennessee Board of Regents that offers transfer (college transfer) programs, two-year degrees, and certificate programs. Its main campus is located off Pellissippi Parkway in western Knox County. As of 2011, the school had a system-wide enrollment of over 11,000 students, About Pellissippi State. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. Johnson University (formerly Johnson Bible College) is a Bible college affiliated with the Christian churches and churches of Christ. As of 2012, the school had an enrollment of 845. Johnson traditionally specializes in training preachers and ministers, but also offers degrees in counseling, teaching, and nonprofit management. About Johnson. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. South College (formerly Knoxville Business College) is a for-profit (for-profit school) school located in West Knoxville that offers undergraduate and graduate programs in business, health care, criminal justice, and legal fields. The school had an enrollment of 717 as of 2010. Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Student Enrollment, Completion and Placement Report, FY 2009-10 - South College. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. Knoxville College is a historically black college that has operated in Knoxville since the 1870s. The school offers a Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies and an Associate of Arts degree. Knoxville College had an enrollment of about 100 students as of 2010. Linda McCoy, New Knoxville College President Has Plan to Add Stability and Seek Reaccreditation, ''Knoxville News Sentinel'', 10 December 2010. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. Institutions with branch campuses (satellite campus) in Knoxville include ITT Technical Institute, King University, Lincoln Memorial University (namely, the Duncan School of Law), National College of Business & Technology, Roane State Community College, Strayer University, Tennessee Wesleyan College, and Tusculum College. Virginia College offers career programs in Knoxville. Colleges in Knoxville - Tennessee Colleges in Knoxville TN Huntington College of Health Sciences, which offers distance courses (distance education) in nutrition and health, has its offices in Knoxville. Primary and secondary education Public schools in Knoxville are part of the Knox County Schools system, which oversees 89 schools (50 elementary, 14 middle, 14 high, and 11 adult centers) serving over 56,000 students. This system includes 5 magnet schools and a STEM (STEM fields) academy. Knox County high schools had a graduation rate of 86.6%, as of 2011. Knox County Schools, Strategic Plan Results - Graduation Rate. Retrieved: 20 January 2012. The average classroom ratio is 14 students per teacher. Knox County is home to over 50 private and parochial schools, the largest of which include the Christian Academy of Knoxville, the Webb School of Knoxville, Grace Christian Academy, Cedar Springs Weekday School, and Sacred Heart Cathedral School. Knoxville-Area Private Schools Ranked According to Enrollment, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 20 January 2012. Libraries The Knox County Public Library system consists of the Lawson McGhee Library, located downtown, and 17 branch libraries, overseeing a collection of over 1.3 million volumes. Infrastructure Health Knox County's hospital system contains over 2,600 licensed beds in 7 general use hospitals and one children's hospital. The city's largest hospital as of 2011 was the University of Tennessee Medical Center, which had 581 beds, followed by Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center (541), Parkwest Medical Center (462), and Physicians Regional (370). East Tennessee Hospitals, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. The city's largest ambulatory surgery center was the Parkwest Surgery Center, which employed 58 physicians and 35 nurses, followed by the Fort Sanders West Outpatient Surgery Center and the St. Mary's Ambulatory Surgery Center South. Knoxville-Area Ambulatory Surgical Treatment Centers, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. A 2009 study by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute found that Knox Countians had a life expectancy of 76 years. Knoxville-Area County Health Report, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. The study also found that 22% of Knox County adults smoked, 28% were obese, 11% were binge drinkers, and 14% lacked health insurance. In 2009, Knox County experienced 8 days of unhealthy air (air pollution) due to high levels of particulate matter (Atmospheric particulate matter), and 25 days due to high ozone levels. Utilities The Knoxville Utilities Board (KUB) provides electricity, water, and wastewater management to Knoxville residents and businesses. KUB's service area covers 688 square miles and includes over 5,200 miles of power lines providing electricity to over 196,000 customers. KUB - Electricity, KUB website. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. The average electric bill was just over $96 per month. Knoxville-Area Utilities, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. KUB purchases its electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority. Transportation Highways 275px right thumb The James White Parkway connects Interstate 40 I-40 (File:Knoxville-hall-of-fame-drive-tn1.jpg) with Downtown Knoxville. The two principal interstate highways serving Knoxville are Interstate 40 (Interstate 40 in Tennessee), which connects the city to Asheville (Asheville, North Carolina) (directly) and Bristol (Bristol, Tennessee) (via I-81) to the east and Nashville (Nashville, Tennessee) to the west, and Interstate 75, which connects the city to Chattanooga (Chattanooga, Tennessee) to the south and Lexington (Lexington, Kentucky) to the north. The two interstates merge just west of Knoxville near Dixie Lee Junction (Dixie Lee Junction, Tennessee) and diverge as they approach the Downtown area, with I-40 continuing on through the Downtown area and I-75 turning north. Interstate 640 provides a bypass (bypass (road)) for I-40 travellers, and Interstate 275 (Interstate 275 (Tennessee)) provides a faster connection to I-75 for Downtown travellers headed north. A spur route of I-40, Interstate 140 (Interstate 140 (Tennessee)) (Pellissippi Parkway), connects West Knoxville with McGhee Tyson Airport. Knoxville's busiest road is a stretch of U.S. Route 129 (U.S. Route 129 in Tennessee) known as Alcoa Highway, which connects the Downtown area with McGhee Tyson Airport. Knoxville Book of Lists - Knox Co.'s Busiest Roads, Knoxvillebiz.com (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 11 January 2012. A merged stretch of US-70 (U.S. Route 70 in Tennessee) and US-11 (U.S. Route 11 in Tennessee) enters the city from the east along Magnolia Avenue, winds its way through the Downtown area, crosses the U.T. campus along Cumberland Avenue ("The Strip"), and proceeds through West Knoxville along Kingston Pike. US-441 (U.S. Route 441 in Tennessee), which connects Knoxville to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, passes along Broadway in North Knoxville, Henley Street in the Downtown area, and Chapman Highway in South Knoxville. US-25W (U.S. Route 25W (Tennessee)) connects Knoxville with Clinton (Clinton, Tennessee). thumb left Bridges over the Tennessee River (File:Knoxville-R.jpg) Tennessee State Route 158 loops around the Downtown area from Kingston Pike just west of U.T.'s campus, southward and eastward along Neyland Drive and the riverfront, and northward along the James White Parkway before terminating at I-40. TN-168 (Tennessee State Route 168), known as Governor John Sevier Highway, runs along the eastern and southern periphery of the city. TN-162 (Tennessee State Route 162) (Pellissippi Parkway) connects West Knoxville with Oak Ridge (Oak Ridge, Tennessee). TN-331 (Tennessee State Route 331) (Tazewell Pike) connects the Fountain City (Fountain City, Tennessee) area to rural northeast Knox County. TN-332 (Tennessee State Route 332) (Northshore Drive) connects West Knoxville and Concord (Concord, Knox County, Tennessee). TN-33 (Tennessee State Route 33) (Maryville Pike) traverses much of South Knoxville. Four vehicle bridges connect Downtown Knoxville with South Knoxville, namely the South Knoxville Bridge (James White Parkway), the Gay Street Bridge (Gay Street (Gay Street (Knoxville))), the Henley Street Bridge, or Henley Bridge (Henley Street), and the J. E. "Buck" Karnes Bridge (Alcoa Highway). Two railroad bridges, located between the Henley Street Bridge and Buck Karnes Bridge, serve the CSX and Northfolk Southern railroads. Smaller bridges radiating out from the downtown area include the Western Avenue Viaduct and Clinch Avenue Viaduct, the Robert Booker Bridge (Summit Hill Drive), the Hill Avenue Viaduct, and the Gay Street Viaduct. Mass transit Public transportation is provided by Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), which operates over 80 buses, road trolley (tourist trolley)s, and paratransit vehicles, and transports more than 3.6 million passengers per year. Regular routes connect the Downtown area, U.T., and most residential areas with major shopping centers throughout the city. KAT operates using city, state, and federal funds, and passenger fares, and is managed by Veolia Transport. Knoxville Area Transit website. Retrieved: 31 December 2011. Airports Knoxville and the surrounding area is served by McGhee Tyson Airport (IATA:TYS), a Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


local band

. Because of the small batch (batch production)es and high amount of labor involved, Graeter's pints are more expensive than other brands of premium ice cream, such as Ben & Jerry's (Ben and Jerry) and Häagen-Dazs. History The Aces were first a local band in Knoxville, Tennessee in the late 1960s to early 1970s although they went by another name "Fatback". The band consisted of founding members Russell Smith (Russell Smith (singer)), Jeff 'Stick' Davis, and Butch

Craig last Harris publisher Allmusic url Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


career singing

accessdate 17 October 2010 she began her professional career singing on local radio in Cleveland, Ohio and Detroit, Michigan. ref


service young

in the broadcasting antenna farm on Sharp's Ridge in Knoxville. Early life and career Zollicoffer was born on a plantation in Bigbyville in Maury County, Tennessee, son of John Jacob and Martha (Kirk) Zollicoffer. He was a descendant of immigrants from Switzerland who had settled in North Carolina in 1710. His grandfather George had served as a captain in the Revolutionary War, and had been granted a tract of land in Tennessee as a reward for his military service. Young Zollicoffer


quot writing

and a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Michigan, where she won the 2003 Hopwood Award for her Novel-in-Progress. Anne Vandermey, Alum got her start in "U" writing program" (original), ''The Michigan Daily'' (16 April 2006). Retrieved 10 May 2009. Archived copy. She is married to a Bulgarian scholar


news classical

''', was an 18th century settlement that became Knoxville, Tennessee, in the United States. The name also refers to the fort, itself. image 200px (Image:WUOT logo.png) city Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), Tennessee area Knoxville '''WUOT''' (91.9 FM (FM broadcasting)) is a radio station broadcasting a triple format of news, classical music and jazz. Licensed to Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, the station serves the Knoxville area. The station is currently owned by University of Tennessee and features programing from American Public Media, National Public Radio and Public Radio International. Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


based sports

. It was the same year that MK acquired super agent Jimmy Sexton and Athletic Resource Management, a Memphis-based sports agency representing players in the National Basketball Association, National Football League and Major League Baseball. http: www.allbusiness.com company-activities-management company-structures-ownership 7117993-1.html In 1997, it purchased two more outfits, Atlanta-based underwriting firm Knox, Wall


title voice

;WXYZ" Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


athletic scholarship

Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


charity based

in Tennessee US 321 from Greeneville and Johnson City, and both US 19W (U.S. Route 19W) and US 19 (U.S. Route 19 in Tennessee) between Johnson City and Bristol. US 11E also has an unsigned (unsigned highway) concurrency with Tennessee State Route 34 (SR 34) for almost all of its course in Tennessee. '''Heart Support of America''' is an American non-profit organization, a 501(c)(3) charity, based in Knoxville, Tennessee, also known as "

Knoxville, Tennessee

established_title Settled established_date 1786 established_title2 Founded established_date2 1791 established_title3 Incorporated established_date3 1815 founder James White (James White (General)) named_for Henry Knox area_magnitude 1 E+7 unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_total_km2 269.8 area_land_km2 255.2 area_water_km2 14.6 area_water_percent 5.4 elevation_footnotes elevation_ft 886 elevation_m 270 population_as_of 2010 (2010 United States Census) population_est 183270 pop_est_as_of 2013 pop_est_footnotes population_footnotes population_total 178874 population_rank US: 128th (List of United States cities by population) population_density_km2 701.0 population_urban 558,696 (US: 74th (List of United States urban areas)) population_metro 852,715 (US: 64th (List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas)) population_blank1_title Combined Statistical Pop (Table of United States Combined Statistical Areas) population_blank1 1,096,961 (US: 50th (List of Combined Statistical Areas)) population_demonym Knoxvillian Knoxvillite timezone EST (North American Eastern Time Zone) utc_offset -5 timezone_DST EDT (Eastern Daylight Time) utc_offset_DST -4 postal_code_type Zip code postal_code 37901-37902, 37909, 37912, 37914-37924, 37927-37934, 37938-37940, 37950, 37995-37998, 37920 area_code 865 blank_name FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) code blank_info blank1_name GNIS (Geographic Names Information System) feature ID blank1_info website footnotes

'''Knoxville''' is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee, and the county seat of Knox County (Knox County, Tennessee). The KMSA is, in turn, the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2013, had a population of 1,096,961.

First settled in 1786, Knoxville was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century, though the arrival of the railroad in 1855 led to an economic boom. During the Civil War, the city was bitterly divided over the secession issue, and was occupied alternately by both Confederate and Union armies. Following the war, Knoxville grew rapidly as a major wholesaling and manufacturing center. The city's economy stagnated after the 1920s as the manufacturing sector collapsed, the Downtown area declined, and city leaders became entrenched in highly partisan political fights. Hosting the 1982 World's Fair helped reinvigorate the city, and revitalization initiatives by city leaders and private developers have had major successes in spurring growth in the city, especially the downtown area. "Ask Doc Knox," "Downtown's Homegrown Revival," ''Metro Pulse'', 16 November 2011. Retrieved: 20 December 2011.

Knoxville is the home of the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee, whose sports teams, called the "Volunteers" or "Vols," are extremely popular in the surrounding area. Knoxville is also home to the headquarters of the Tennessee Valley Authority, as well as the Tennessee Supreme Court's courthouse for East Tennessee and corporate headquarters of several national and regional companies. As one of the largest cities in the Appalachian region, Knoxville has positioned itself in recent years as a repository of Appalachian culture, and is one of the gateways to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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