Knoxville, Tennessee

What is Knoxville, Tennessee known for?


career scoring

'' . - March 9, 1987. Kelli Litsch would lead Thomas to back-to-back state championships in 1980 and 1981, set a new state tournament scoring record of 338 points in nine games over three years, for a 37.6 point-per-game average, go to Southwestern Oklahoma State University, became the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics's (NAIA) first four-time All-American, leading Southwestern to three national titles (1982, 1983, and 1985), and setting an NAIA career

scoring record with 2,673 points. She would be inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in Knoxville, Tennessee in 2004. - Sherman, Mike. - "The Latest Litsch No Serious Sister But Staci Gets The Job Done For - Thomas". - ''The Daily Oklahoman'' (The Oklahoman). - March 3, 1988 - Toth, Susan. - "Looking Back on Oklahoma Mar. 9". - ''The Daily Oklahoman'' (The Oklahoman). - March 9, 1991. - "Litsch, Woodall inducted into Women's Hall of Fame". - Associated Press. - (c o ''The Daily Oklahoman'' (The Oklahoman)). - November 15, 2004. Highways Interstate 81 (Interstate 81 in Pennsylvania) passes through Pittston Township (Pittston Township, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania). Interstate 81 follows US Route 11 from northern New York state to Knoxville, Tennessee. (A portion of Interstate 75 and the entire length of Interstate 59 follow Route 11 for the remainder of its journey to New Orleans, Louisiana.) I-81 does not enter major metropolitan areas; it instead serves smaller cities such as Roanoke (Roanoke, Virginia) and Winchester, Virginia; Hagerstown, Maryland; Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) and Scranton, Pennsylvania; and Binghamton (Binghamton, New York) and Syracuse, New York. After passing through Watertown, New York, Interstate 81 crosses the St. Lawrence Seaway (Saint Lawrence Seaway) to meet Ontario Highway 401 in Canada. Pittston is also located near the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, Interstate 476, providing service from Clarks Summit (Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania) to Philadelphia. The film was based loosely on an incident in which a driver transporting moonshine was said to have crashed to his death on Kingston Pike in Knoxville, Tennessee between Bearden Hill and Morrell Road. Per Metro Pulse writer Jack Renfro, the incident occurred in 1952 and may have been witnessed by James Agee, who passed the story on to Mitchum. '''Clinton''' is a city in Anderson County (Anderson County, Tennessee), Tennessee, United States. Its population was 9,409 at the United States Census, 2000. It is the county seat of Anderson County (Anderson County, Tennessee) Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


quot banks

and operates stations in the latter two markets; not having them operate WATE and WLNS would resolve fears of one entity owning (potentially or otherwise) two top-rated stations in the same market, something that is forbidden by the FCC. "Banks' Bid on Young Stations Clears Hurdle", from broadcastingcable.com, 7 22 2009. "Gray Gets Nod to Manage Young Stations", from tvnewsday.com, 7 22 2009 * Templetown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Temple University) * Fort Sanders (Fort Sanders (Knoxville neighborhood)) in Knoxville, Tennessee (University of Tennessee) * Fort Wood (Fort Wood Historic District) in Chattanooga, Tennessee (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) '''U.S. Route 11W''' ('''US 11W''') is a divided highway (List of divided U.S. Routes) of US 11 (U.S. Route 11) in the U.S. states of Tennessee and Virginia. The U.S. Highway (United States Numbered Highways), which is complemented by US 11E (U.S. Route 11E) to the south and east, runs Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


played games

its history, Auburn played games against their traditional rivals at neutral sites rather than Jordan–Hare Stadium. This occurred due to the difficulty in traveling to Auburn during the first half of the 20th century and the capacity of other stadiums. These games included Alabama (University of Alabama) (played at Legion Field in Birmingham), Tennessee (University of Tennessee) (played at Legion Field in Birmingham or Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee)), Georgia Tech (Georgia Institute of Technology) (played in Birmingham or Atlanta (Atlanta, Georgia)), and Georgia (University of Georgia) (played at Memorial Stadium (A.J. McClung Memorial Stadium) in Columbus (Columbus, Georgia)). As Auburn became more accessible and the stadium expanded in capacity, more games were moved to Jordan–Hare Stadium. The most notable of these matchups occurred on December 2, 1989, when Auburn defeated #2 Alabama in the first Iron Bowl played at Jordan–Hare. thumb right Karl Edward Wagner (File:Karl Edward Wagner Seattle 1989.jpg) '''Karl Edward Wagner''' (12 December 1945 – 13 October 1994) was an award-winning American (United States) writer, poet, editor and publisher of horror (Horror fiction), science fiction, and heroic fantasy, who was born in Knoxville, Tennessee and originally trained as a psychiatrist. He wrote numerous dark fantasy and horror stories. As an editor, he created a definitive three-volume set of Robert E. Howard's Conan fiction, and edited the long-running and genre-defining ''Year's Best Horror and Fantasy'' series. His Carcosa publishing house issued four volumes of the best stories by some of the major figures of the Golden Age pulps (Pulp magazine). He is possibly best known for his creation of the long-running series of stories featuring Kane (Kane (fantasy)), the Mystic Swordsman. '''Lookout Mountain''' is located at the northwest corner of the U.S. state of Georgia (Georgia (U.S. state)), the northeast corner of Alabama, and along the southern border of Tennessee at Chattanooga (Chattanooga, Tennessee). Lookout Mountain, along with Sand Mountain (Sand Mountain (Alabama)) to the northwest, makes up a large portion of the southernmost end of the Cumberland Plateau. The summit, called "High Point", is located just east of Thompsonville in Walker County, Georgia, and has an elevation of Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


history national

* Civic Coliseum (James White Civic Coliseum) * Fort Dickerson * Haley Heritage Square * Ijams Nature Center * James White's Fort * Knoxville Botanical Gardens and Arboretum * Knoxville Convention Center * Knoxville Greenways * Knoxville Museum of Art * Knoxville Police Museum * Knoxville Zoo * Mabry-Hazen House * Marble Springs * Market Square (Market Square, Knoxville) * Frank H. McClung Museum * Museum of East Tennessee History * National Register of Historic Places, Knox County, Tennessee * Old City (Old City Knoxville) * Ramsey House (Ramsey House (Knox County, Tennessee)) * Sunsphere * Tennessee River Boat * Tennessee Theatre * Three Rivers Rambler Train Ride * Volunteer Landing * Women's Basketball Hall of Fame * World's Fair Park (1982 World's Fair) Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


band performing

ground, 2,319 feet (707m) above the surrounding valley floor, and 4,370 feet (1,332m) above mean sea level. The antenna for WKPT-TV next door stands 193 feet (58.8m) above ground, also 2,319 feet (707m) above the valley floor, and 4,366 feet (1,331m) above mean sea level. The stations' digital antennas are also on their respective towers. The Roan Mountain Hilltoppers, a well-known old-time (Old-time music) string band performing traditional

Craig last Harris publisher Allmusic url Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


year regular

and Clinch Avenue Viaduct, the Robert Booker Bridge (Summit Hill Drive), the Hill Avenue Viaduct, and the Gay Street Viaduct. Mass transit Public transportation is provided by Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), which operates over 80 buses, road trolley (tourist trolley)s, and paratransit vehicles, and transports more than 3.6 million passengers per year. Regular routes connect the Downtown area, U.T., and most residential areas with major shopping centers throughout the city. KAT


membership biography

, which was funded primarily by Amway, and endorsed by Congress. Another example is the present representation for Shanghai 2010, which is under scrutiny by Congress: although private enterprise funding has been speculated to have been secured, Congress is yet to decide as to whether it is in the United States interests that the planned representation can go ahead. The United States Congress has not provided a specific reason for failing to pay membership. Biography Farragut was born in 1801 to Elizabeth Shine (b. 1765 - d. 1808), of North Carolina Scots-Irish descent, and her husband George Farragut (Jordi Farragut), a native of Minorca, Spain, at Lowe's Ferry on the Holston River (Tennessee River). It was a few miles southeast of Campbell's Station, near Knoxville, Tennessee. Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


driving campaign

Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 14 January 2012. Laura BowerDriving-Campaign Tombras Creates New Nationwide Impaired Driving Campaign for U.S. Department of Transportation: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over. 30 August 2011. Other notable privately held companies based in the city include Bush Brothers (Bush Brothers and Company), Sea Ray (and its parent company


wrestling quot

, at the tapings of the May 12 edition of ''Impact!'', the show was re-branded ''Impact Wrestling'' with the slogan "Where Wrestling Matters", with the color scheme changing from red to blue, white and gray. This led to the URL of TNA Wrestling's website, tna wrestling.com to be named impactwrestling.com. Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.


liberal studies

of 717 as of 2010. Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Student Enrollment, Completion and Placement Report, FY 2009-10 - South College. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. Knoxville College is a historically black college that has operated in Knoxville since the 1870s. The school offers a Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies and an Associate of Arts degree. Knoxville College had an enrollment of about 100 students as of 2010. Linda McCoy, New Knoxville College President Has Plan to Add Stability and Seek Reaccreditation, ''Knoxville News Sentinel'', 10 December 2010. Retrieved: 15 January 2012. Institutions with branch campuses (satellite campus) in Knoxville include ITT Technical Institute, King University, Lincoln Memorial University (namely, the Duncan School of Law), National College of Business & Technology, Roane State Community College, Strayer University, Tennessee Wesleyan College, and Tusculum College. Virginia College offers career programs in Knoxville. Colleges in Knoxville - Tennessee Colleges in Knoxville TN Huntington College of Health Sciences, which offers distance courses (distance education) in nutrition and health, has its offices in Knoxville. Primary and secondary education Public schools in Knoxville are part of the Knox County Schools system, which oversees 89 schools (50 elementary, 14 middle, 14 high, and 11 adult centers) serving over 56,000 students. This system includes 5 magnet schools and a STEM (STEM fields) academy. Knox County high schools had a graduation rate of 86.6%, as of 2011. Knox County Schools, Strategic Plan Results - Graduation Rate. Retrieved: 20 January 2012. The average classroom ratio is 14 students per teacher. Knox County is home to over 50 private and parochial schools, the largest of which include the Christian Academy of Knoxville, the Webb School of Knoxville, Grace Christian Academy, Cedar Springs Weekday School, and Sacred Heart Cathedral School. Knoxville-Area Private Schools Ranked According to Enrollment, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 20 January 2012. Libraries The Knox County Public Library system consists of the Lawson McGhee Library, located downtown, and 17 branch libraries, overseeing a collection of over 1.3 million volumes. Infrastructure Health Knox County's hospital system contains over 2,600 licensed beds in 7 general use hospitals and one children's hospital. The city's largest hospital as of 2011 was the University of Tennessee Medical Center, which had 581 beds, followed by Fort Sanders Regional Medical Center (541), Parkwest Medical Center (462), and Physicians Regional (370). East Tennessee Hospitals, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. The city's largest ambulatory surgery center was the Parkwest Surgery Center, which employed 58 physicians and 35 nurses, followed by the Fort Sanders West Outpatient Surgery Center and the St. Mary's Ambulatory Surgery Center South. Knoxville-Area Ambulatory Surgical Treatment Centers, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. A 2009 study by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute found that Knox Countians had a life expectancy of 76 years. Knoxville-Area County Health Report, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. The study also found that 22% of Knox County adults smoked, 28% were obese, 11% were binge drinkers, and 14% lacked health insurance. In 2009, Knox County experienced 8 days of unhealthy air (air pollution) due to high levels of particulate matter (Atmospheric particulate matter), and 25 days due to high ozone levels. Utilities The Knoxville Utilities Board (KUB) provides electricity, water, and wastewater management to Knoxville residents and businesses. KUB's service area covers 688 square miles and includes over 5,200 miles of power lines providing electricity to over 196,000 customers. KUB - Electricity, KUB website. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. The average electric bill was just over $96 per month. Knoxville-Area Utilities, Knoxville Book of Lists (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 24 January 2012. KUB purchases its electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority. Transportation Highways 275px right thumb The James White Parkway connects Interstate 40 I-40 (File:Knoxville-hall-of-fame-drive-tn1.jpg) with Downtown Knoxville. The two principal interstate highways serving Knoxville are Interstate 40 (Interstate 40 in Tennessee), which connects the city to Asheville (Asheville, North Carolina) (directly) and Bristol (Bristol, Tennessee) (via I-81) to the east and Nashville (Nashville, Tennessee) to the west, and Interstate 75, which connects the city to Chattanooga (Chattanooga, Tennessee) to the south and Lexington (Lexington, Kentucky) to the north. The two interstates merge just west of Knoxville near Dixie Lee Junction (Dixie Lee Junction, Tennessee) and diverge as they approach the Downtown area, with I-40 continuing on through the Downtown area and I-75 turning north. Interstate 640 provides a bypass (bypass (road)) for I-40 travellers, and Interstate 275 (Interstate 275 (Tennessee)) provides a faster connection to I-75 for Downtown travellers headed north. A spur route of I-40, Interstate 140 (Interstate 140 (Tennessee)) (Pellissippi Parkway), connects West Knoxville with McGhee Tyson Airport. Knoxville's busiest road is a stretch of U.S. Route 129 (U.S. Route 129 in Tennessee) known as Alcoa Highway, which connects the Downtown area with McGhee Tyson Airport. Knoxville Book of Lists - Knox Co.'s Busiest Roads, Knoxvillebiz.com (''Knoxville News Sentinel''), 2012. Retrieved: 11 January 2012. A merged stretch of US-70 (U.S. Route 70 in Tennessee) and US-11 (U.S. Route 11 in Tennessee) enters the city from the east along Magnolia Avenue, winds its way through the Downtown area, crosses the U.T. campus along Cumberland Avenue ("The Strip"), and proceeds through West Knoxville along Kingston Pike. US-441 (U.S. Route 441 in Tennessee), which connects Knoxville to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, passes along Broadway in North Knoxville, Henley Street in the Downtown area, and Chapman Highway in South Knoxville. US-25W (U.S. Route 25W (Tennessee)) connects Knoxville with Clinton (Clinton, Tennessee). thumb left Bridges over the Tennessee River (File:Knoxville-R.jpg) Tennessee State Route 158 loops around the Downtown area from Kingston Pike just west of U.T.'s campus, southward and eastward along Neyland Drive and the riverfront, and northward along the James White Parkway before terminating at I-40. TN-168 (Tennessee State Route 168), known as Governor John Sevier Highway, runs along the eastern and southern periphery of the city. TN-162 (Tennessee State Route 162) (Pellissippi Parkway) connects West Knoxville with Oak Ridge (Oak Ridge, Tennessee). TN-331 (Tennessee State Route 331) (Tazewell Pike) connects the Fountain City (Fountain City, Tennessee) area to rural northeast Knox County. TN-332 (Tennessee State Route 332) (Northshore Drive) connects West Knoxville and Concord (Concord, Knox County, Tennessee). TN-33 (Tennessee State Route 33) (Maryville Pike) traverses much of South Knoxville. Four vehicle bridges connect Downtown Knoxville with South Knoxville, namely the South Knoxville Bridge (James White Parkway), the Gay Street Bridge (Gay Street (Gay Street (Knoxville))), the Henley Street Bridge, or Henley Bridge (Henley Street), and the J. E. "Buck" Karnes Bridge (Alcoa Highway). Two railroad bridges, located between the Henley Street Bridge and Buck Karnes Bridge, serve the CSX and Northfolk Southern railroads. Smaller bridges radiating out from the downtown area include the Western Avenue Viaduct and Clinch Avenue Viaduct, the Robert Booker Bridge (Summit Hill Drive), the Hill Avenue Viaduct, and the Gay Street Viaduct. Mass transit Public transportation is provided by Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), which operates over 80 buses, road trolley (tourist trolley)s, and paratransit vehicles, and transports more than 3.6 million passengers per year. Regular routes connect the Downtown area, U.T., and most residential areas with major shopping centers throughout the city. KAT operates using city, state, and federal funds, and passenger fares, and is managed by Veolia Transport. Knoxville Area Transit website. Retrieved: 31 December 2011. Airports Knoxville and the surrounding area is served by McGhee Tyson Airport (IATA:TYS), a Union Soldier monument, which stands in the eastern corner of the cemetery, is one of the largest Union monuments in the South. Jack Neely, ''The Marble City: A Photographic Tour of Knoxville's Graveyards'' (Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 1999), pp. xx-xxi, 47. In 1996, the cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places as part of a multiple properties submission for national cemeteries. He attended the University of Chattanooga (now the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga) and received a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from the University of Tennessee College of Law in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) in 1951. He received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army. He is a former member of the Metropolitan Government Charter Commission. He currently works as an attorney, having once been an acting attorney for Hamilton County and an attorney for the Hamilton County Board of Education. Joe M. Haynes graduated from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee) with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, and with a J.D. (Juris Doctor) from Nashville School of Law. He is a member and former chairman of the Davidson County Legislative Delegation. He was Vice-Mayor (vice mayor) of the City of Goodlettsville (Goodlettsville, Tennessee) from 1986 to 1988 and Commissioner from 1976 to 1978. He works as an attorney, and he is a member of the Nashville Bar Association, as well as one of its former presidents and directors. He is married to Barbara Haynes, Judge of the Third Circuit Court in Davidson County. Ashland City | The Tennessean | tennessean.com right 180px thumb Monument to the 79th at the Battle of Fort Sanders site in Knoxville (Image:Fort-sanders-ny-79th-tn1.jpg) At Fort Sanders (Battle of Fort Sanders) (known by the Confederates as Fort Loudoun), Knoxville (Knoxville, Tennessee), the Highlanders helped inflict a massive defeat on Longstreet's (James Longstreet) troops. The position, a bastioned earthwork, was on top of a hill, which formed a salient (Salients, re-entrants and pockets) at the northeast corner of the town's defences. In front of the earth- work was a 12-foot-wide ditch, some eight feet deep, with an almost vertical slope to the top of the parapet, about 15 feet above the bottom of the ditch. It was defended by 12 guns and, according to different sources, 250 or 440 troops, of which the 79th provided 120 men.

Knoxville, Tennessee

established_title Settled established_date 1786 established_title2 Founded established_date2 1791 established_title3 Incorporated established_date3 1815 founder James White (James White (General)) named_for Henry Knox area_magnitude 1 E+7 unit_pref Imperial area_footnotes area_total_km2 269.8 area_land_km2 255.2 area_water_km2 14.6 area_water_percent 5.4 elevation_footnotes elevation_ft 886 elevation_m 270 population_as_of 2010 (2010 United States Census) population_est 183270 pop_est_as_of 2013 pop_est_footnotes population_footnotes population_total 178874 population_rank US: 128th (List of United States cities by population) population_density_km2 701.0 population_urban 558,696 (US: 74th (List of United States urban areas)) population_metro 852,715 (US: 64th (List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas)) population_blank1_title Combined Statistical Pop (Table of United States Combined Statistical Areas) population_blank1 1,096,961 (US: 50th (List of Combined Statistical Areas)) population_demonym Knoxvillian Knoxvillite timezone EST (North American Eastern Time Zone) utc_offset -5 timezone_DST EDT (Eastern Daylight Time) utc_offset_DST -4 postal_code_type Zip code postal_code 37901-37902, 37909, 37912, 37914-37924, 37927-37934, 37938-37940, 37950, 37995-37998, 37920 area_code 865 blank_name FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) code blank_info blank1_name GNIS (Geographic Names Information System) feature ID blank1_info website footnotes

'''Knoxville''' is a city in the U.S. state of Tennessee, and the county seat of Knox County (Knox County, Tennessee). The KMSA is, in turn, the central component of the Knoxville-Sevierville-La Follette Combined Statistical Area, which, in 2013, had a population of 1,096,961.

First settled in 1786, Knoxville was the first capital of Tennessee. The city struggled with geographic isolation throughout the early 19th century, though the arrival of the railroad in 1855 led to an economic boom. During the Civil War, the city was bitterly divided over the secession issue, and was occupied alternately by both Confederate and Union armies. Following the war, Knoxville grew rapidly as a major wholesaling and manufacturing center. The city's economy stagnated after the 1920s as the manufacturing sector collapsed, the Downtown area declined, and city leaders became entrenched in highly partisan political fights. Hosting the 1982 World's Fair helped reinvigorate the city, and revitalization initiatives by city leaders and private developers have had major successes in spurring growth in the city, especially the downtown area. "Ask Doc Knox," "Downtown's Homegrown Revival," ''Metro Pulse'', 16 November 2011. Retrieved: 20 December 2011.

Knoxville is the home of the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee, whose sports teams, called the "Volunteers" or "Vols," are extremely popular in the surrounding area. Knoxville is also home to the headquarters of the Tennessee Valley Authority, as well as the Tennessee Supreme Court's courthouse for East Tennessee and corporate headquarters of several national and regional companies. As one of the largest cities in the Appalachian region, Knoxville has positioned itself in recent years as a repository of Appalachian culture, and is one of the gateways to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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