Klaipėda

What is Klaipėda known for?


modern version

;" 2014 style "text-align:right;" 157,350 thumb right 200px Klaipėda city seal, 1446 (diameter ). From the Archive of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, Berlin (File:Klaipėda seal.png). The coat of arms of Klaipėda is also used as coat of arms of Klaipėda city municipality. The modern version was created by the designer Kęstutis Mickevičius. The modern coat of arms was created by restoring old seals of the Memel city


poetry published

cms.php?sec_id 1&pag_id 2 International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights a human rights organization that included protests against Soviet activities in Lithuania amongst its activities. His involvement led to conflicts with the government, but in 1977 he gained permission to emigrate to the US and became a professor at Yale University. ''The Sign of Speech'', a volume of poetry, published in Lithuania before his departure, was followed


international short

, the International Festival of Street Theatres, the International Short Film Festival, and the Klaipėda Sea Festival, among others. Sports class wikitable - ! Club ! Sport ! League ! Venue - KK Neptūnas Neptūnas


intense religious

mother's name is sometimes erroneously given as Anna Regina Porter. Kant's paternal grandfather had emigrated from Scotland to East Prussia, and his father still spelled their family name "Cant". http: www.csudh.edu phenom_studies western lect_9.html In his youth, Kant was a solid, albeit unspectacular, student. He was brought up in a Pietist (Pietism) household that stressed intense religious devotion, personal humility, and a literal

; Kant's paternal grandfather had emigrated from Scotland to East Prussia, and his father still spelled their family name "Cant". http: www.csudh.edu phenom_studies western lect_9.html In his youth, Kant was a solid, albeit unspectacular, student. He was brought up in a Pietist (Pietism) household that stressed intense religious devotion, personal humility, and a literal interpretation of the Bible. Consequently, Kant received a stern education


food basketball

Klaipėda, Lithuania colors Blue and White WikiPedia:Klaipėda Commons:Category:Klaipėda


devotion personal

mother's name is sometimes erroneously given as Anna Regina Porter. Kant's paternal grandfather had emigrated from Scotland to East Prussia, and his father still spelled their family name "Cant". http: www.csudh.edu phenom_studies western lect_9.html In his youth, Kant was a solid, albeit unspectacular, student. He was brought up in a Pietist (Pietism) household that stressed intense religious devotion, personal humility, and a literal interpretation of the Bible. Consequently, Kant received a stern education WikiPedia:Klaipėda Commons:Category:Klaipėda


starting world

1937, Goerdeler told Sir Robert Vansittart (Robert Vansittart, 1st Baron Vansittart) that he would like to see the Nazi regime replaced by a right-wing military dictatorship that would seek British friendship, in exchange for which Goerdeler wanted British support for annexing parts of Poland and Czechoslovakia. Weinberg, Gerhard, ''The Foreign Policy of Hitler's Germany Starting World War II'', Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980 page 43 In October 1937, during


years main

; the Lithuanian population was predominant in the area's rural districts. ''EB'', 1938 Year Book, see map of languages. Inter-war years thumb ''Marktstrasse'' with St. John's Church (File:Klaipeda Kirche.jpg) thumb left 200px Memel before World War II (File:Klaipeda Panorama.jpg) thumb right Hitler (File:Hitler in Klaipeda.jpg) arrives in Memel, March 1939


local fishing

by the municipal company Liepājas tramvajs. The Port of Liepāja has a wide water area and consists of three main parts. The Winter harbor is located in the Trade channel and serves small local fishing vessels as well as medium cargo ships. Immediately north of the Trade channel is the main area of the port, separated from the open sea by a line of breakwater (Breakwater (structure))s. This part of the port can accommodate large ships and ferries. Further north is Tosmare harbor, also called Tosmare channel, which was formerly a military harbor but is now used for ship repairs and other commercial purposes. Liepāja also welcomes yachts and other leisure vessels which can enter the Trade channel and moor almost in the center of the city. Liepāja has a railway connection to Jelgava and Riga and through them to the rest of Latvia's railway network. There is just one passenger station in the New town, but the railway extends further and links to the port. There is also a northward railway track leading to Ventspils, but in recent decades it has fallen into disuse for economic reasons. The railway provides the main means of delivering cargo to the port. Two main highways, the A9 and A11 (List of National Roads in Latvia), connect the city and its port to the rest of the country. The A9 leads north-west towards Riga and central Latvia and the A11 leads south to the border with Lithuania and its only port Klaipėda and to Palanga International Airport. The city also hosts Liepāja International Airport, one of three international airports in Latvia; it is located outside the city limits, north of the Lake of Liepāja near Cimdenieki. Only charter races are available from the Liepāja airport. Highways Kaunas is served by a number of major motorways. European route E67 is a highway running from Prague in the Czech Republic to Helsinki in Finland by way of Poland, Kaunas Lithuania, Riga (Latvia), and Tallinn (Estonia). It is known as the Via Baltica (European route E67) between Warsaw and Tallinn, a distance of 670 kilometres (420 mi). It is the most important road connection between the Baltic states. Kaunas also is linked to Vilnius to its east and Klaipėda, on the Baltic Sea, via the A1 (A1 highway (Lithuania)) motorway and Daugavpils (Latvia), via E262 (European route E262)(A6 (A6 highway (Lithuania))) highway. Germany Only at Sassnitz Mukran ferry terminal for freight train ferries to Klaipėda and Baltijsk. - For eight years, (1621–1629), the exhausting and expensive Polish War dragged on. Swedish Livonia was conquered by the beginning of 1626, and the theatre of hostilities was transferred to the Prussian provinces of Poland. The fertile and easily defensible delta of the Vistula was now occupied and Gustavus treated it as a permanent conquest, making his great Chancellor Axel Oxenstierna its first Governor-General (Governor-General in the Swedish Realm). But this was the limit of the Swedish advance. All Gustavus' further efforts were frustrated by the superior strategy of the Polish hetman Stanisław Koniecpolski, and in June 1629, the king gladly accepted the lucrative Treaty of Altmark. By this truce Sweden was, for six years, to retain possession of its Livonian conquests, besides holding Elbling (Elbląg), the Vistula delta, Braniewo in West, and Pillau and Memel (Klaipėda) in Prussia (Duchy of Prussia), with the right to levy tolls at Pillau, Memel (Klaipėda), Danzig (Gdańsk), Labiau and Windau (Ventspils). From these tolls Gustavus derived, in 1629 alone, 500,000 Riksdalers, a sum equivalent to the whole of the extraordinary subsidies granted to him by the Riksdag (Parliament of Sweden). For eight years, (1621–1629), the exhausting and expensive Polish War dragged on. Swedish Livonia was conquered by the beginning of 1626, and the theatre of hostilities was transferred to the Prussian provinces of Poland. The fertile and easily defensible delta of the Vistula was now occupied and Gustavus treated it as a permanent conquest, making his great Chancellor Axel Oxenstierna its first Governor-General (Governor-General in the Swedish Realm). But this was the limit of the Swedish advance. All Gustavus' further efforts were frustrated by the superior strategy of the Polish hetman Stanisław Koniecpolski, and in June 1629, the king gladly accepted the lucrative Treaty of Altmark. By this truce Sweden was, for six years, to retain possession of its Livonian conquests, besides holding Elbling (Elbląg), the Vistula delta, Braniewo in West, and Pillau and Memel (Klaipėda) in Prussia (Duchy of Prussia), with the right to levy tolls at Pillau, Memel (Klaipėda), Danzig (Gdańsk), Labiau and Windau (Ventspils). From these tolls Gustavus derived, in 1629 alone, 500,000 Riksdalers, a sum equivalent to the whole of the extraordinary subsidies granted to him by the Riksdag (Parliament of Sweden). At first Frederick William and his advisors attempted to pursue a policy of neutrality in the Napoleonic Wars. Although they succeeded in keeping out of the Third Coalition in 1805, eventually Frederick William was swayed by the belligerent attitude of the queen, who led Prussia's pro-war party, and entered into war in October 1806. On 14 October 1806, at the Battle of Jena-Auerstädt, the French defeated the Prussian army led by Frederick William, and the Prussian army collapsed. The royal family fled to Memel (Klaipėda), East Prussia, where they fell on the mercy of Emperor Alexander I of Russia (who, rumour has it, had fallen in love with Queen Luise). * WikiPedia:Klaipėda Commons:Category:Klaipėda


small sculptures

is known for its main icons: sculpture '''Annchen von Tarau''', located in theater square, old sailing ship '''Meridianas''' (there was a restaurant inside). There are also lots of small sculptures (sculpture of mouse, dog, dragon, chimney sweep, post pigeons and others) hiding in the old town. There are several museums. The most popular include the '''History Museum of Lithuania Minor''', the '''Klaipeda Picture Gallery''', the '''Marine museum''' and the '''Clock museum'''. Klaipeda's old town is small but interesting. Anika Square has a balcony where Adolf Hitler addressed a crowd. Legend has it that Hitler was annoyed because the statue depicting "Anikė" of the Lithuanian folk tale was not facing him, so he had the statue removed. A replica is now in its place. * WikiPedia:Klaipėda Commons:Category:Klaipėda

Klaipėda

'''Klaipėda''' ( (former German name: Memel) is a city in Lithuania situated at the mouth of the Danė River where it flows into the Baltic Sea. It is the third largest city in Lithuania and the capital of Klaipėda County.

The city has a complex recorded history, partially due to the combined regional importance of the Port of Klaipėda, a usually ice-free port on the Baltic Sea, and the Akmena – Danė River. It has been controlled by the Teutonic Knights, the Duchy of Prussia, the Kingdom of Prussia, the German Empire, the Entente (Triple Entente) States immediately after World War I, Lithuania as a result of the 1923 Klaipėda Revolt, and the Third Reich following the 1939 German ultimatum to Lithuania. The city was incorporated into Lithuania during its time as a Soviet Socialist Republic and has remained within Lithuania following its re-establishment as an independent state.

The population shrank from 207,100 in 1992 to 157,350 in 2014. Popular seaside resorts found close to Klaipėda are Nida (Nida (town)) to the south on the Curonian Spit, and Palanga to the north.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017