Kingston, Ontario

What is Kingston, Ontario known for?


numerous publications

, Ottawa, Canada (Ottawa, Ontario), and of Stanford University, California. He is the author of numerous publications on international development. * ''Ontario'': Kingston, Ontario Kingston


regular field

that it is simply known as Highway 11 (Ontario Highway 11) for much of its route. Today, all these roads mentioned are still in use. thumb The Court House and Jail in 1829. (File:Toronto ou York capitale du Haut Canada août 1829.jpg) The '''Royal Canadian Horse Artillery''' is the name given to the regular field artillery units of the Canadian Army. RCHA units are the senior units of the Canadian land field force, with a history dating back to the birth of Canada as a nation. 'A' and 'B


young religious

), "Central" (between Thunder Bay and Kingston (Kingston, Ontario)), and "Eastern" (Kingston, Ottawa and everything east of that). Regions of the CUC However, for Young Religious Unitarian Universalists (YRUU) programming in Canada, the "Central" and "Eastern" regions are combined to form a youth region known as "QuOM" (Quebec, Ontario and the Maritimes), giving the youth


solo recordings

Kingston , Ontario, Canada genre Alternative rock Although Weeping Tile have not recorded a new album as a unit since the breakup, they still sometimes play together on stage in Kingston, Ontario, and sometimes perform on each other's solo recordings. They also recorded a cover of Rheostatics' "Public Square" for the 2007 tribute album ''The Secret Sessions'', with both Wright and Harmer sharing vocal duties. History Between April 16


products quot

''' was one of the first diagramming and flow charting software packages available for personal computers. This product was the flagship software produced by HavenTree Software Limited, of Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario Canada. HavenTree software, formed in 1981, offered predecessor non-interactive products "EasyFlow" (1983) and "EasyFlow-Plus" (1984). Interactive EasyFlow - so named to distinguish it from the preceding products - was offered from 1985 until


development+play

and correctional services), tourism (tourism in Canada) and culture (Culture of Canada). Manufacturing, and research and development play a smaller role than in the past. One of Kingston's major industrial employers of the 20th century, the Canadian Locomotive Company, closed in 1969, and the former Alcan and DuPont operations employ far fewer people than in the past. But due to the city's central location between Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Syracuse, NY a trucking and logistics


'music program

Bradstreet ." Rogers grew up in Ottawa, Ontario. She was the "Head Girl" at her high school, Lisgar Collegiate Institute. She played in the Ottawa Youth Orchestra and was a spare on the ''Reach for the Top'' team. Rogers began her career in broadcasting at CFRC, the campus radio station of Queen's University (Queen's University, Canada). She also worked at Kingston, Ontario's CKWS (CKWS-FM), hosting a country music program while still a student

''' is part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Queen's Faculty of Arts and Sciences) at Queen's University (Queen's University, Canada), in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. The School of Music is housed on the main campus of the University within Harrison-LeCaine Hall on Bader Lane. Founded in 1969 as the Department of Music, students at the School can enroll in the Bachelor of Music (B. Mus) program, Bachelor of Arts (Music) program, or the Concurrent Education (Music) program. The Queen's University Faculty of Law is a professional faculty of Queen's University (Queen's University, Canada) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario, Canada and is regarded as one of the most prestigious institutions of legal education in Canada. '''WGR''', or '''WGR Sports Radio 550''', is an all sports radio station in Buffalo, New York that broadcasts on 550 AM (AM radio). It is the flagship station (Flagship (radio)) of the Buffalo Bills, Buffalo Sabres, and Buffalo Bandits, and is currently the only full-time sports talk station in the city of Buffalo. Its studios are located in Amherst, New York, and transmitter in suburban Hamburg, New York (Hamburg (village), New York). Although it has a power of 5,000 watts, during the day its signal can be heard as far north as Barrie (Barrie, Ontario), Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario) and Kingston, Ontario, as far west as Windsor, Ontario, as far east as Syracuse (Syracuse, New York), and as far south as Erie, Pennsylvania and Cleveland (Cleveland, Ohio) and Youngstown, Ohio. At night its signal can be heard as far north as Sudbury (Greater Sudbury), Barrie and Peterborough, Ontario, as far west as Guelph (Guelph, Ontario), Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario) and Waterloo, Ontario, as far east as Batavia (Batavia, New York), and as far south as Jamestown (Jamestown, New York) and Olean (Olean, New York). *Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) - CHML *Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) - CKLC (CKLC-FM) CKLC-FM (CFLY-FM) (shared affiliation 1953-1964) *London (London, Ontario) - CFPL (CFPL (AM)) Towards the close of the action, as the flagship ''Royal George'' was maneuvering to fire another broadside, a 24-pound shot struck her stern and raked her whole length, killing eight men, and doing much damage. ''Royal George'' also had severe damage to her top mast and rigging. Other British warships were damaged but the extent is unknown. Upon this the signal of retreat was given and the British fleet bore away for Kingston, Ontario without ceremony. At this, the band struck up the national tune of Yankee Doodle, and the troops yelled three cheers of victory. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) around 1790 and was educated at Cornwall (Cornwall, Ontario) by John Strachan. During the War of 1812, he served with the Frontenac militia. In 1820, he was appointed to the Legislative Council (Legislative Council of Upper Canada) for the province. In 1822, he became an honorary member of the Executive Council (Executive Council of Upper Canada) and was made a regular member 5 years later. The Province of Ontario used manpower whenever possible, to employ as many people as it could. In Kingston, Ontario an unemployment relief camp on Barriefield lower common was set up under the command of the Commandant of the Royal Military College of Canada. Public works projects at the Royal Military College of Canada included rebuilding the dry stone wall and moat of Fort Frederick (Fort Frederick (Kingston)); the physics building extension, the connection from the Fort Frederick Dormitory to the new Yeo mess building, the new wing of the hospital, a new garage, roadwork, levelling the grounds at RMC for new football fields and a new running track. http: data4.archives.ca netacgi nph-brs?s2 &s4 &s3 &s1 kingston&s6 y+and+gif&s8 &Sect4 AND&l 0&Sect1 IMAGE&Sect2 THESOFF&Sect4 AND&Sect5 FOTOPEN&Sect6 HITOFF&d FOTO&p 1&u http: www.archives.ca 02 02011503_e.html&r 123&f G Public works projects at the Royal Military College of Canada He was born in Stockbridge, Massachusetts in 1799, the son of Barnabas Bidwell. His family settled in Bath (Bath, Ontario) in Upper Canada before the War of 1812. He studied with a law firm in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and was called to the Ontario Bar in 1821. When his father was unseated in 1821 based on allegations of misappropriation of funds in Massachusetts, Bidwell presented himself as a candidate but was declared ineligible. In 1824, he was allowed to run for office and was elected to the 9th Parliament of Upper Canada representing Lennox (Lennox County, Ontario) & Addington (Addington County, Ontario). He held the seat until 1836. In 1828, he helped introduce a bill which made it easier for American-born residents to become citizens. He also lobbied for responsible government within the province. - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.


century paintings

Bay Thunder Bay, ON Early 19th century paintings show "shinney", or "shinny", an early form of ice hockey with no standard rules, played in Nova Scotia, Canada. Thus, many of these early games had also absorbed the physically aggressive aspects of what the Mi'kmaq (Mi'kmaq people) in Nova Scotia called ''dehuntshigwa'es'' (lacrosse). Games of shinney are also known to have been played on the St. Lawrence River at Montreal


professional talent

features local amateur and professional talent. Known as the "City of the 1000 Islands", Brockville is located on the north shore of the Saint Lawrence River, directly opposite Morristown, New York (Morristown (village), New York), about half-way between Cornwall (Cornwall, Ontario) in the east and Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in the west, and roughly a 40-minute drive to the national capital of Ottawa. It is one of Ontario's oldest urban centres, and is named after the British general Sir Isaac Brock. Brockville is at the downstream end of the world-famous Thousand Islands, which extend as far as Kingston, Ontario (at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River at Lake Ontario), 80 km away. There are several institutions, localities, thoroughfares, and landforms named in honour of him in Canada. Significant monuments to Wolfe in Canada exist on the Plains of Abraham where he fell, and near Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Ontario Governor John Graves Simcoe named Wolfe Island (Wolfe Island (Ontario)), an island in Lake Ontario and the Saint Lawrence River off the coast of Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), near the Royal Military College of Canada, in Wolfe's honour in 1792. On 13 September 2009, the Wolfe Island Historical Society led celebrations on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of James Wolfe's victory at Quebec. A life-size statue in Wolfe's likeness is to be sculpted. Greene began acting while attending Queen's University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), where he also acquired a knack for broadcasting with the Radio Workshop of the university's Drama Guild on the campus radio station CFRC. He gave up on a career in chemical engineering and, upon graduation, found a job as a radio broadcaster (broadcasting) for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). Only one first rate has survived to the present. HMS ''Victory'' (HMS Victory), Vice-Admiral Nelson's (Horatio Nelson) flagship at the Battle of Trafalgar, is preserved at HMNB Portsmouth as an active warship in commission. The hull of the 112-gun HMS ''St Lawrence'' (HMS St Lawrence (1814)), which was built and operated entirely in fresh water during the War of 1812, survives intact in shallow water near shore in Kingston, Ontario and is a popular diving attraction. Two other famous first rates were - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.


small professional

; Small professional batteries of artillery were established at Quebec City and Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.

Kingston, Ontario

thumb "View of Frontenac or Cataracoui in 1759". Watercolor map depicting Fort Frontenac (File:Fort Frontenac 1759.jpg) thumb Overlooking Kingston Waterfront (File:Kingston Ontario 3.JPG) thumb Line of defence: three Martello towers (Shoal Tower (File:Three Martellos in Kingston Ontario.jpg), Fort Frederick (Fort Frederick (Kingston, Ontario)), Cathcart Tower). A fourth tower, Murney Tower, is located southwest of this location thumb Kingston City Hall (Ontario) Kingston City Hall (File:Kingston on city hall.jpg) thumb Kingston waterfront, circa 1900 (File:Postcard of the Kingston waterfront.jpg) thumb Watercolour depicting the naval dockyard, Point Frederick, Kingston, 1815, showing commodore's house and the ships ''Canada'' and ''Wolfe'' under construction. (File:Dockyard Point Frederick.jpg) thumb Nurses' Home, Kingston General Hospital, circa 1910. (File:Ann Baillie Building.jpg)

'''Kingston''' is a Canadian (Canada) city located in Eastern Ontario where the St. Lawrence River flows out of Lake Ontario.

Growing European exploration in the 17th century and the desire for the Europeans to establish a presence close to local Native occupants to control trade led to the founding of a French trading post known as Fort Frontenac in 1673. The fort became a focus for settlement.

Located midway between Toronto and Montreal, Kingston was named the first capital of the Province of Canada (Act of Union 1840) on February 15, 1841, by Governor Lord Sydenham (Charles Poulett Thomson, 1st Baron Sydenham). City of Kingston City Hall: Canada's Would-Be First Parliament. While its time as a political centre was short, Kingston has remained an important military installation.

Kingston was the county seat of Frontenac County until 1998. Kingston is a separated municipality from the County of Frontenac. According to the 2011 Canadian census (Canada 2011 Census), the population of the city proper was 123,363,

Kingston is nicknamed the ''"Limestone City"'' because of the many heritage buildings constructed using local limestone.

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