Kingston, Ontario

What is Kingston, Ontario known for?


quot speed

culture Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario band, the Tragically Hip, released a song called "Speed River" on their 2009 album ''We Are The Same (We Are the Same)''. Richardson was born in Winnipeg (Winnipeg, Manitoba), Manitoba and attended St. John's-Ravenscourt School. After attending Queen's University (Queen's University, Kingston) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He served as an anti


television arts

Arts degree in Radio and Television Arts from Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in Toronto, Ontario; she was in the same class as noted science-fiction writer Robert J. Sawyer; they collaborated on their final TV Studio Lab assignment, a short science-fiction show. frequency 101.9 MHz (FM (FM radio)) area Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario format campus (campus radio), community (community radio) '''CFRC-FM''' is the campus radio


outstanding work

-09-07 She attended Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, where she won the prestigious Lorne Greene Award for outstanding work in the theater. She then studied at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art in London. She was married to actor Michael Murphy (Michael Murphy (actor)) in 1988 and they have two children. They divorced in January 2009 and she remarried. One unusual example is Elrond College, a now-defunct student housing co-operative - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.


important great

, Kingston remained an important Great Lakes port and a centre for shipbuilding and locomotive manufacturing, including the Canadian Locomotive Company, at one time the largest locomotive works in the British Empire. Most heavy industry has now left the city, and employment is now primarily in the institutional, military, and service retail sectors. Kingston grew moderately through the 20th century through a series of annexations of lands in adjacent Kingston Township, including


weekly location

changed during production to something that differed greatly from the game's original plot. Upon its debut, the show was well-received by critics;

buildings, and relatively expensive as a building material. thumb The Great Pyramid of Giza (File:Gizeh Cheops BW 1.jpg), one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World; its outside cover is made entirely from limestone. Lucasfilm had conceived the idea for a television adaptation, which The Family Channel (Television networks preceding ABC Family#The Family Channel) purchased in 1990.

location New York City first Benjamin last Svetkey publisher Time Inc. issue 101 date January 17, 1992 url http: www.ew.com ew article 0,,309225,00.html accessdate February 9, 2011 issn 1049-0434 oclc 21114137 A sitcom named after the game (Maniac Mansion (TV series)) debuted in September 1990.


powerful play

among the pebbles ... Maybe the most powerful play ever written in Canada about two down and out couples in Kingston Ontario living on the edge, the outer edge of respectability and trying to make some sense of their lives - to find love and a kind of domestic normality under the worst conceivable conditions. It's a very, very disturbing play and I think a deeply tragic play about the lowest depths one can imagine in a Canadian city.'' About a Vancouver production at http


black detailed

to the Government of Canada 2006 census, 94.2% of the population were Caucasian; of the visible minorities, 1.7% were Chinese, 1.2% were South Asian, and 0.8% were black. Detailed socio-demographic analysis and information about Kingston can be found in the ''Kingston Community Profile, 2009: A Socio-Demographic Analysis of Kingston, Ontario Canada''.


album songs

University, Kingston Queen's University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario, in 1988, then dropped out of the Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy) program to pursue his writing career. Crummey returned to St. John's in 2001. A guitarist vocalist and bass player, he frequently appears on recordings by artists in the Kingston, Ontario scene, including Weeping Tile (Weeping Tile (band)), Sarah Harmer and Luther Wright and the Wrongs. Harmer's 1999 album '' Songs


played small

College, Oxford , where he received a BLitt degree in 1938. The next year he published his thesis, ''Shakespeare's Boy Actors'', and embarked on an acting career outside London. In 1940, he played small roles and did literary work for the director at the Old Vic Repertory Company (Old Vic) in London. Also that year, Davies married Australian Brenda Mathews (Brenda Davies), whom he had met at Oxford, and who was then working as stage manager (Stage management) for the theatre. Bennett served as the Rector of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario from 1935–1937, even while he was still prime minister. At the time, this role covered mediation for significant disputes between Queen's students and the university administration. ''The Authentic Voice of Canada'', by Christopher McCreery and Arthur Milnes (editors), Kingston, Ontario, McGill - Queen's University Press, Centre for the Study of Democracy, 2009, pp. 197-198. Bennett served as the Rector of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario from 1935–1937, even while he was still prime minister. At the time, this role covered mediation for significant disputes between Queen's students and the university administration. ''The Authentic Voice of Canada'', by Christopher McCreery and Arthur Milnes (editors), Kingston, Ontario, McGill - Queen's University Press, Centre for the Study of Democracy, 2009, pp. 197-198. *John Boyko; ''Bennett: The Rebel Who Challenged And Changed A Nation'', Toronto, Key Porter Books, 2010, ISBN 1554702488. *Christopher McCreery and Arthur Milnes (editors): ''The Authentic Voice of Canada'', Kingston, Ontario, McGill - Queen's University Press, Centre for the Study of Democracy, 2009, ISBN 978-1-55339-275-0. This book is a collection of Bennett's speeches in the British House of Lords from 1941-47. *Peter Busby Waite; ''Loner: Three Sketches of the Personal Life and Ideas of R.B. Bennett, 1870-1947'', 1992. Niagara frontier, 1813 Because of the difficulties of land communications, control of the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River corridor was crucial. When the war began, the British already had a small squadron of warships on Lake Ontario and had the initial advantage. To redress the situation, the Americans established a Navy yard at Sackett's Harbor, New York. Commodore Isaac Chauncey took charge of the large number of sailors and shipwrights sent there from New York; they completed the second warship built there in a mere 45 days. Ultimately, 3,000 men worked at the shipyard, building eleven warships and many smaller boats and transports. Having regained the advantage by their rapid building program, Chauncey and Dearborn attacked York (York, Upper Canada) (now called Toronto), the capital of Upper Canada, on April 27, 1813. The Battle of York was an American victory, marred by looting and the burning of the Parliament buildings and a library. However, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) was strategically more valuable to British supply and communications along the St. Lawrence. Without control of Kingston, the U.S. navy could not effectively control Lake Ontario or sever the British supply line from Lower Canada. From 1826 to 1832, the Rideau Canal was built to provide a secure waterway from Bytown (now Ottawa) to Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) via the Rideau River then southwest via the canal to Lake Ontario, avoiding the narrows of the St. Lawrence River, where ships could be vulnerable to American cannon fire. To defend the western end of the canal, the British also built Fort Henry (Fort Henry, Ontario) at Kingston, including four Martello towers, which remained operational until 1891. October–December * October 16 – Queen's University (Queen's University, Kingston) is founded in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario, by Rev. (Reverend) Thomas Liddell, who carries a Royal Charter from Queen Victoria and becomes the school's first principal (Principal (university)). * October 30 – A fire at the Tower of London destroys its Grand Armoury and causes a quarter of a million pounds worth of damage. - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.


popular cultural

programs in Kingston include The Union Gallery (Queen's University's student art gallery), Verb Gallery, Open Studio 22, the Kingston Arts Council gallery, and The Artel: Arts Accommodations and Venue. The Kingston WritersFest Kingston WritersFest occurs annually. For over four decades the Ukrainian Canadian Club of Kingston has hosted the "Lviv, Ukraine" pavilion as part of the Folklore tradition, holding this popular cultural

Kingston, Ontario

thumb "View of Frontenac or Cataracoui in 1759". Watercolor map depicting Fort Frontenac (File:Fort Frontenac 1759.jpg) thumb Overlooking Kingston Waterfront (File:Kingston Ontario 3.JPG) thumb Line of defence: three Martello towers (Shoal Tower (File:Three Martellos in Kingston Ontario.jpg), Fort Frederick (Fort Frederick (Kingston, Ontario)), Cathcart Tower). A fourth tower, Murney Tower, is located southwest of this location thumb Kingston City Hall (Ontario) Kingston City Hall (File:Kingston on city hall.jpg) thumb Kingston waterfront, circa 1900 (File:Postcard of the Kingston waterfront.jpg) thumb Watercolour depicting the naval dockyard, Point Frederick, Kingston, 1815, showing commodore's house and the ships ''Canada'' and ''Wolfe'' under construction. (File:Dockyard Point Frederick.jpg) thumb Nurses' Home, Kingston General Hospital, circa 1910. (File:Ann Baillie Building.jpg)

'''Kingston''' is a Canadian (Canada) city located in Eastern Ontario where the St. Lawrence River flows out of Lake Ontario.

Growing European exploration in the 17th century and the desire for the Europeans to establish a presence close to local Native occupants to control trade led to the founding of a French trading post known as Fort Frontenac in 1673. The fort became a focus for settlement.

Located midway between Toronto and Montreal, Kingston was named the first capital of the Province of Canada (Act of Union 1840) on February 15, 1841, by Governor Lord Sydenham (Charles Poulett Thomson, 1st Baron Sydenham). City of Kingston City Hall: Canada's Would-Be First Parliament. While its time as a political centre was short, Kingston has remained an important military installation.

Kingston was the county seat of Frontenac County until 1998. Kingston is a separated municipality from the County of Frontenac. According to the 2011 Canadian census (Canada 2011 Census), the population of the city proper was 123,363,

Kingston is nicknamed the ''"Limestone City"'' because of the many heritage buildings constructed using local limestone.

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