Kingdom of Hungary

What is Kingdom of Hungary known for?


founder high

Austria and a Prince of Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary) and Bohemia. He was the last Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights from the Habsburg dynasty. country Hungary titles King of Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary), Dalmatia, Croatia, Cumania, Slavonia, Bulgaria, Lodomeria, Duke of Styria (Styria) founder Álmos (High Prince Álmos) The '''Árpáds''' or '''Arpads''' ( ,


location work

-moravania-madari.blogspot.com 2010 08 geograficka-poloha-moravy-frankovia.html last Bowlus first Charles R. title Geografická poloha Moravy trans_title Moravia's Geographical Location work Frankovia, Moravania a Maďari: Boj o stredný Dunaj, 788-907 date 30 April 2005 language Slovak accessdate 2010-08-24


monumental public

in Kingdom of Hungary in the 1870s and 1880s. In the fast growing capital, Budapest many monumental public buildings were built in Neo-Renaissance style like Saint Stephen's Basilica and the Hungarian State Opera House. Andrássy Avenue is an outstanding ensemble of Neo-Renaissance townhouses from the last decades of the 19th century. The most famous Hungarian architect of the age, Miklós Ybl preferred Neo-Renaissance in his works. File:Smyrna-massacre-refugees port-1922


early place

, Bulgarians- Civilizers of the slavs, p.48 Hungarians (Hungarian people) led by Árpád settled in the territory at the end of the 9th century, Molnar, A Concise History of Hungary, Chronology pp. 12 and a century later officially founded the Kingdom of Hungary. Research places the probable residence of the Árpáds as an early place of central power near what became Budapest. Molnar, A Concise History


frequent attacks

, it became a site of frequent attacks and battles, along with the city, and a place of frequent stay of Hungarian kings (who mainly hold tournaments and parties), so it receives a more luxurious equipment. Around 1000 the Pozsony county (comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary))), one of the first counties in Hungary, is founded probably by Grand Prince Stephen I (Stephen I of Hungary). Coins with the inscriptions "PHANUS REX" and "RESLAVVA CIV" were found in Sweden


drawings paintings

in the libraries and archives of the Hungarian Kingdom (Kingdom of Hungary) (Budapest) and in Transylvania at Cluj (Cluj-Napoca), Alba Iulia and Braşov. Over fifteen months, he discovered hundreds of original documents, manuscripts, chronicles, treaties, manifestos, old drawings, paintings and facsimiles. For his contribution, he was elected in 1880 to a corresponding membership and the position of librarian archivist. In 1884 he received the position of translator for the Romanian


agricultural high

, he devoted his time to aesthetical study, poetry, criticism, and the defense of Kazinczy's theories. History The first agricultural high-school in the Kingdom of Hungary was established here by a Slovakian enlightenment (Age of Enlightenment) scholar and engineer Samuel Tešedík (in Hungarian: Sámuel Tessedik). The city was re-settled by Slovaks (among others) in the 18th century, and many Slovaks still live in Szarvas. The town had 17771 Slovak and 7845 Hungarian inhabitants in 1900 and in 1920 had 7544 Slovak and 17224 Hungarian inhabitants. The geometrical centre-point of the Hungarian Kingdom (before 1920) was near Szarvas. Evading religious persecution in the Kingdom of Hungary, then under the control of the staunchly Roman Catholic Habsburgs, Bach, being a Protestant, settled in Wechmar, a village in the German state of Thuringia. His descendants continued to live there until Christoph Bach, grandfather of J.S. Bach, moved to Erfurt to take up a position as municipal musician or ''Stadtpfeifer'' (lit. "town piper"). The first mention in documents of the locality dates back to 1335 when it was known as Petk. Sederhat was registered only in 1913, Turnu in 1333 under the name of Mok, while Bodrogu Vechi in 1422 under the name of Bodruch. It has a complex political history with periods of Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) rule, periods of Habsburg Monarchy, Kingdom of Hungary and Kingdom of Romania. After the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867, it became part of the Kingdom of Hungary within Austria-Hungary up until the Treaty of Trianon. Since then the town has been part of Romania. The first mention in documents of the locality dates back to 1335 when it was known as Petk. Sederhat was registered only in 1913, Turnu in 1333 under the name of Mok, while Bodrogu Vechi in 1422 under the name of Bodruch. It has a complex political history with periods of Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) rule, periods of Habsburg Monarchy, Kingdom of Hungary and Kingdom of Romania. After the Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867, it became part of the Kingdom of Hungary within Austria-Hungary up until the Treaty of Trianon. Since then the town has been part of Romania. thumb 250px Stefan Dragutin (Image:StefanDragutin.jpg), king of Srem (Srem (region)) (1282-1316) Parts of Vojvodina were conquered by the Kingdom of Hungary between the 10th and 12th centuries. This was followed by the destruction of the local Slavic tribal organization and introduction of the county system of rule. The first known prefect of the Bač county (in the region of Bačka) was recorded in 1074 and his name was Vid, which is a Slavic name by origin. During the rule of the Hungarian king Coloman (Coloman of Hungary) (1095-1116), the local Serb nobles in Bačka were Uroš, Vukan and Pavle. A record from 1309 speak about "Schismatics" (Orthodox Christians), who lived in Bačka. Arsenije I Bogdanović from Srem, the second Serb archbishop (1233-1263) after Saint Sava, was born in Srem (Srem (region)), in the village Dabar (Dabar (village)) near Slankamen. After the creation of an autocephalous Serbian Orthodox Church in 1219 and negotiations between Archbishop Sava (Sveti Sava) and the Hungarian crown, the Eastern Orthodox Slavic population north of the Danube was subjected under its jurisdiction. History The site has been inhabited since 4000 BC and was part of the Great Moravian Empire. http: www.zahorskemuzeum.sk ?q page 155 http: books.google.sk books?id aHcvAAAAIAAJ&q Skalica+velka+morava&dq Skalica+velka+morava&hl sk&ei TiflTpi1CcXBtAbU1NSxCQ&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&sqi 2&redir_esc y From the second half of the 10th century until 1918, it was part of the Kingdom of Hungary. The first written record of Skalica was made in 1218 as ''Zaculcza''; the name refers to the cliffs the inhabitants built their settlement over. The settlement developed around a triangular plaza, which was rare during the Middle Ages. Its town privileges were conferred in 1372 by King Louis I of Hungary. In 1428 Skalica became a bastion for the Hussites; during the Hussite Wars, the majority of its then predominantly German-speaking populace fled or was exiled. Many Habaners (adherents of a sect similar to Anabaptism) settled in Skalica in the 16th century. For eight days in 1918 Skalica was the seat of a Czechoslovak delegation which unsuccessfully tried to negotiate the removal of Hungarian (Hungary) troops from Upper Hungary ''(today Slovakia)''. The '''Battle of Kressenbrunn''' was fought in July 1260 near Groissenbrunn (Engelhartstetten) in Lower Austria between the Kingdom of Bohemia and the Kingdom of Hungary for the possession of the duchies of Austria (Archduchy of Austria) and Styria (Duchy of Styria). The Bohemian forces were led by King Ottokar II Přemysl (Ottokar II of Bohemia), while the Hungarians were led by King Béla IV. Moise initially maintained a close relation with Sultan (Ottoman Dynasty) Suleiman the Magnificent: on Turkish orders, he sent an embassy to Sibiu demanding that the Transylvanian city submit to Ottoman vassal Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) King (List of Hungarian rulers) John Zápolya; when refused, Moise's army, placed under the leadership of Seneschal '''Drăgan din Merişani''' and '''Neagoe din Periş''' (the assassins of Radu de la Afumaţi and, possibly, of Basarab V) attacked and plundered the outskirts. Several octagonal pillars, redesigned at least once during the building process, were probably completed around 1444. Vătăşianu, p.230-231 One of them features the inlaid crest of military leader John Hunyadi, who is mentioned among the church benefactors. Vătăşianu, p.231 The most intense work took place before and after 1450, and involved completing the exceptionally large number of portals (Portal (architecture)), including the northern "Golden Gate" and its adjacent altar of the Holy Sacrifice. The eastern portal, commissioned by the Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) King (List of Hungarian rulers) Matthias Corvinus (Matthias Corvinus of Hungary), was completed in 1476. Vătăşianu, p.526 The vestry was enlarged at some point between 1500 and 1515. Vătăşianu, p.527 birth_date March 20, 1854 birth_place Csorna, Kingdom of Hungary, Habsburg Empire death_date March 8, 1939 DATE OF BIRTH March 20, 1854 PLACE OF BIRTH Csorna, Kingdom of Hungary, Habsburg Empire DATE OF DEATH March 18, 1939 '''Jozef Karol Hell''' (Slovak (Slovak language): ''Jozef Karol Hell'', German (German Language): ''Josef ph Karl Hell'', Hungarian (Hungarian language): ''Hell József Károly'') (15 May 1713, Banská Štiavnica - 11 March 1789, Banská Štiavnica) was a Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) the Kingdom of Serbia and its dynasty became the backbone of the new multinational state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later renamed Yugoslavia). Czechoslovakia, combining the Kingdom of Bohemia with parts of the Kingdom of Hungary, became a new nation. Russia became the Soviet Union and lost Finland, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia, which became independent countries. The Ottoman Empire was soon replaced by Turkey and several other countries in the Middle East. thumb right Map of territorial changes in Europe after World War I (File:Map Europe 1923-en.svg) From then onwards, it was a centre of mining and metallurgy until the end of the 20th century, particularly focussed on the iron and copper industries. At the start of the 20th century, the Krompachy Ironworks (Krompašská železiareň) had around 3,500 employees and was the biggest ironworks of its time in the Kingdom of Hungary. The Ironworks closed after World War I. '''János Bottyán''' (1643, Esztergom, Hungary – September 27, 1709), also known as '''Blind Bottyán''', '''Vak Bottyán János''' was a Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) kuruc general. Such super-sized bombards had been employed in Western Europe siege warfare since the beginning of the 15th century, Schmidtchen (1977a), pp. 153–157 and were introduced to the Ottoman army in 1453 by the gunfounder Orban (from Brasov, Kingdom of Hungary) on the occasion of the Siege of Constantinople (Fall of Constantinople). Schmidtchen (1977b), p. 226 Ali's piece is assumed to have followed closely the outline of these guns. Bruck was born in Temesvár, Kingdom of Hungary, Austro-Hungarian Empire, since 1920 Timişoara, since 1920 in Romania.


title variety

the Kingdom of Serbia and its dynasty became the backbone of the new multinational state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later renamed Yugoslavia). Czechoslovakia, combining the Kingdom of Bohemia with parts of the Kingdom of Hungary, became a new nation. Russia became the Soviet Union and lost Finland, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia, which became independent countries. The Ottoman Empire was soon replaced by Turkey and several other countries in the Middle East. thumb right Map of territorial changes in Europe after World War I (File:Map Europe 1923-en.svg) From then onwards, it was a centre of mining and metallurgy until the end of the 20th century, particularly focussed on the iron and copper industries. At the start of the 20th century, the Krompachy Ironworks (Krompašská železiareň) had around 3,500 employees and was the biggest ironworks of its time in the Kingdom of Hungary. The Ironworks closed after World War I. '''János Bottyán''' (1643, Esztergom, Hungary – September 27, 1709), also known as '''Blind Bottyán''', '''Vak Bottyán János''' was a Hungarian (Kingdom of Hungary) kuruc general. Such super-sized bombards had been employed in Western Europe siege warfare since the beginning of the 15th century, Schmidtchen (1977a), pp. 153–157 and were introduced to the Ottoman army in 1453 by the gunfounder Orban (from Brasov, Kingdom of Hungary) on the occasion of the Siege of Constantinople (Fall of Constantinople). Schmidtchen (1977b), p. 226 Ali's piece is assumed to have followed closely the outline of these guns. Bruck was born in Temesvár, Kingdom of Hungary, Austro-Hungarian Empire, since 1920 Timişoara, since 1920 in Romania.


family originating

in Bursa, to celebrate this victory. Childhood and early years (1881–98) Béla Bartók was born in the small Banatian town of Nagyszentmiklós in the Kingdom of Hungary, Austria-Hungary (since 1920 Sânnicolau Mare, Romania) on March 25, 1881. Bartók's family reflected some of the ethno-cultural diversities of the country. His father, Béla Sr., considered himself thoroughly Hungarian, because on his father's side the Bartók family was a Hungarian lower noble family

, originating from Borsod county (Móser 2006, 44; Bartók 1981, 13), though his mother was from a Roman Catholic Serbian family (Serbs) (Bayley 2001, 16). His mother, Paula (born Paula Voit), had German as a mother tongue, but was ethnically of "mixed Hungarian" origin: Her maiden name Voit is German, probably of Saxon origin from Upper Hungary (Since 1920 in Czechoslovakia, since 1993 in Slovakia), though she spoke Hungarian (Hungarian language) fluently.


construction made

'' with sword & buckler, wearing brigandine with plate armour for hand and legs Brigandines have been used by armies from earliest recorded history Jeremiah 46:4 KJV . Medieval brigandines were essentially a refinement of the earlier coat of plates, which developed in the late 12th century, typically of simpler construction made of larger plates. The Asian-originated armour reached Europe after the Mongol invasion in 1240 that destroyed the Kievan Rus' and generated extensive

Kingdom of Hungary

The '''Kingdom of Hungary''' was a monarchy in Central Europe that existed from the Middle Ages into the twentieth century (1000–1918, 1920–1946). The Principality of Hungary emerged as a Christian kingdom upon the coronation (Coronation of the Hungarian monarch) of the first king Stephen I (Stephen I of Hungary) at Esztergom in 1000 or 1001; Kristó Gyula - Barta János - Gergely Jenő: Magyarország története előidőktől 2000-ig (History of Hungary from the prehistory to 2000), Pannonica Kiadó, Budapest, 2002, ISBN 963-9252-56-5, p. 687, pp. 37, pp. 113 ("Magyarország a 12. század második felére jelentős európai tényezővé, középhatalommá vált." "By the 12th century Hungary became an important European constituent, became a middle power.", "A Nyugat részévé vált Magyarország... Hungary became part of the West"), pp. 616–644 his family (the Árpád dynasty) led the monarchy for 300 years. By the 12th century, the kingdom became a European (Europe) middle power within the Western world.

Due to the Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) occupation of the central and southern territories in the 16th century, the monarchy split into three parts: the Habsburg Royal Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary (1526–1867)), Ottoman Hungary and the semi-independent Principality of Transylvania (Principality of Transylvania (1570–1711)). The Habsburg dynasty held the Hungarian throne after the Battle of Mohács and also played a key role in the liberation wars against the Ottoman Empire.

From 1867, territories connected to the Hungarian crown were incorporated into Austria-Hungary under the name of Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen. The monarchy ended with the deposition of the last king Charles IV (Charles I of Austria) in 1918, after which Hungary became a republic. The kingdom was nominally restored during the "Regency (Kingdom of Hungary (1920–46))" of 1920–1946, ending with the Soviet occupation (Soviet occupation of Hungary) in 1946.

The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic Gerhard Stickel: National, Regional and Minority Languages in Europe state before the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders. From 1102 it also included Croatia (except Istria), being in personal union (Croatia in the union with Hungary) with it, united under the King of Hungary.

Today the feast day of the first king Stephen I (Stephen I of Hungary) (20 August) is a national holiday (Public holidays in Hungary) in Hungary, commemorating the foundation of the state (''Foundation Day''). St. Stephen's Day, National Holidays in Hungary (officeholidays.com) (English)

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