King, Ontario

What is King, Ontario known for?


scientific interest

* Construction and Manufacturing: 24% * Business services: 23% * Wholesale and Retail Trade: 17% * Health and Education: 12% * Finance and Real Estate: 8% The median income for two-parent families is $90,364. For single-parent families, the median income is $43,673. The average value of a dwelling in King in 2006 was $386,416. Religion The township's residents have the following religious affiliation: *39.8% Protestant *38.3% Roman Catholic *17.1% atheist, agnostic or other non-theism *2.9% other Christian *0.1% Jewish *1.8% other religion Language


historical community

the Town of Georgina (Georgina, Ontario). Area: . Opened in 1798 and was likely named for John King, Under-Secretary of State in the William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland Portland administration


extremely low

century, King is now influenced by the significant immigration and diversification resultant from its proximity to Toronto. King Township's population grew by 2.1% between 2006 and 2011, most new residents settling in the communities of King City, Nobleton or Schomberg. The population density is 59.7 people per square kilometre; however, the Township is characterized by areas of extremely low density farming communities and the much higher density of its three major villages. In 2008


significant cultural

significant cultural service provided via municipal funding is the King Township Public Library, which operates four branches in the township. Waste management is provided through the region, and is co-ordinated with programs offered in other towns in York Region. Weekly green bin compost collection began in September 2007 to complement the weekly Blue Box (Blue Box (container)) collection of recyclable material; collection of all other waste was reduced to once every two weeks.


book year

. At the time, the township's boundaries extended to Yonge Street. Lots 61-70 on the map represent the northern portion of the western half of modern-day Oak Ridges. Oak Ridges was established along Yonge Street in 1799 by Joseph Geneviève and a group of French Royalists, who were granted land to settle by the British government. They were also provided with rations


historical development

settlements were founded near rivers, which provided the energy necessary to operate various mills. The earliest were based in Laskay (Laskay, Ontario), Kinghorn, and Eversley. The hamlet of Springhill was established later and flourished; it was renamed King City, now the largest community in the township. *'''Eversley''' is a hamlet that, although it has its own historical development, has slowly been subsumed into King City. It lies on King City's north-eastern edge, south of Snowball


Markham

, the township purchased the disused former Holy Name Catholic Elementary School building and adjacent land from the York Catholic District School Board for $2.95 million. Provincial and federal politics The federal riding of Oak Ridges—Markham is currently represented by Paul Calandra, a member of the Conservative Party of Canada. This riding was created for the 2004 election because of rapid growth in York Region.

2010 Before 2004, King was in the riding of Vaughan—King—Aurora. The portion of King north of Highway 9 (Highway 9 (Ontario)) is part of the York—Simcoe electoral district, represented by Peter Van Loan of the Conservative Party of Canada. The provincial riding of Oak Ridges—Markham is currently represented by Helena Jaczek, a member of the Ontario Liberal Party. It was created as part of Ontario's re-districting to match

Election Results * *


low population

* Construction and Manufacturing: 24% * Business services: 23% * Wholesale and Retail Trade: 17% * Health and Education: 12% * Finance and Real Estate: 8% The median income for two-parent families is $90,364. For single-parent families, the median income is $43,673. The average value of a dwelling in King in 2006 was $386,416. Religion The township's residents have the following religious affiliation: *39.8% Protestant *38.3% Roman Catholic *17.1% atheist, agnostic or other non-theism *2.9% other Christian *0.1% Jewish *1.8% other religion Language According to the 2011 Census, the most prevalent mother tongues for King residents are as follows: * English (English language): 75.6% * Italian (Italian language): 10.1% * German (German language): 1.9% * Polish (Polish language): 1.0% Transportation The Township of King is located between Toronto and Barrie (Barrie, Ontario), stretching from Bathurst Street to just east of Highway 50 (Highway 50 (Ontario)). King is accessible by Highways 400 (Ontario Highway 400), 27 (Highway 27 (Ontario)), 9 (Highway 9 (Ontario)) and 11. Public transportation is provided by York Region Transit (bus service) and GO Transit (bus and train services), but their services are limited in the township due to low population density. King City GO Station is the only train station in the township. York Region Transit's services are confined to the southeastern area, and GO bus serves the Nobleton and King City communities


work part

'''King City GO Station''' is a train and bus station in the GO Transit network located in King City (King City, Ontario), Ontario in Canada. It also serves the nearby communities of Nobleton (Nobleton, Ontario), Oak Ridges (Oak Ridges, Ontario), the northern parts of Maple (Maple, Ontario) (in Vaughan (Vaughan, Ontario)), and other communities in King Township (King, Ontario). It is a stop on the Barrie line train service. Boundaries and demographics KCSS serves a geographically large area, since there are many sparsely populated communities in that area. The primary boundary is similar to the township boundaries for King (King, Ontario), though a small area in the northeast of King is served by schools in Aurora (Aurora, Ontario). Additionally, the eastern part of Oak Ridges (Oak Ridges, Ontario), west of Yonge Street to the King town line, and parts of northern Vaughan (Vaughan, Ontario), including Maple (Maple, Ontario) and Kleinburg (Kleinburg, Ontario) and nearby communities, are served by KCSS.


covers part

York Township Council from 1903 until 1910. He was reeve from 1906 to 1910 and was elected warden of York in 1909. '''King City GO Station''' is a train and bus station in the GO Transit network located in King City (King City, Ontario), Ontario in Canada. It also serves the nearby communities of Nobleton (Nobleton, Ontario), Oak Ridges (Oak Ridges, Ontario), the northern parts of Maple (Maple, Ontario) (in Vaughan (Vaughan, Ontario)), and other communities in King Township (King, Ontario). It is a stop on the Barrie line train service. Boundaries and demographics KCSS serves a geographically large area, since there are many sparsely populated communities in that area. The primary boundary is similar to the township boundaries for King (King, Ontario), though a small area in the northeast of King is served by schools in Aurora (Aurora, Ontario). Additionally, the eastern part of Oak Ridges (Oak Ridges, Ontario), west of Yonge Street to the King town line, and parts of northern Vaughan (Vaughan, Ontario), including Maple (Maple, Ontario) and Kleinburg (Kleinburg, Ontario) and nearby communities, are served by KCSS.

King, Ontario

'''King''' (2011 population 19,899) Statistics Canada (#2011fog) is a township (township (Canada)) in York Region (Regional Municipality of York) north of Toronto, within the Greater Toronto Area in Ontario, Canada.

The rolling hills of the Oak Ridges Moraine are the most prominent visible geographical feature of King. The Holland Marsh, considered to be Ontario's "vegetable basket", straddles King Township and Bradford West Gwillimbury (Bradford West Gwillimbury, Ontario). King is known for its horse and cattle farms.

Though King is predominantly rural, most of its residents inhabit the communities of King City (King City, Ontario), Nobleton (Nobleton, Ontario), and Schomberg (Schomberg, Ontario).

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