Khiva

What is Khiva known for?


sweet water

the border of Turkmenistan. History 300px thumbnail The western gate of the old city (File:KhivaWestGate.jpg) According to legend, Khiva was founded about 2 500 years ago when a son of Noah, Shem, discovered a well in the middle of the desert exclaimed "Khi-wa!" (which locals will take delight in roughly translating this exclamation as "sweet water"). For the next 1 000 years or so, the area was inhabited by settlements that used the nearby ''Amu-Darya river'' to irrigate agriculture. According to the archaeologists Khiva was founded in the 5th or 6th century. As Islam spread to the area, the first major structures were built near Shem's well, and it became known as a small trading post on the Silk Road. First written sources date from the 10th century. The Arab traveller ''Al Istachri'' mentions Khiva in his enumeration of the most important settlements in ''Chorezm''. The Arab geographer ''Ibn Battuta'' visited Khiva in the 14th century. He praised the emir who was untiringly taking care of law and order and reported that the city was so full of people that it was almost impossible to find one's way in the crowd. It wasn't until the 16th century when Khiva was made capital of an Islamic Khanate (starting a bitter rivalry with another Khan 460 km down the Silk Road in Bukhara), that the majority of Khiva's immense architectural projects began and the town established itself as a center of power in the region. Locals will say (sometimes in hushed tones) that if Khiva didn't have a rivalry with nearby Bukhara, it would not be the significant site that it is today. In the 19th century only a strong central power was created and taxes and money were introduced. For a long period of time Khiva was one of the most important markets of slaves in Central Asia. Slavery. however, was formally abolished during the October Revolution of 1917 only. Khiva with its 94 mosques and 63 mederssahs is considered as an important center of Islam. Because of this significance, Khiva was recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1990. Climate Khiva almost has a two-season climate; with slivers of spring and fall in between frigid winters and blazing hot summers. It starts to get uncomfortably cold in Khiva by November, with temperatures hovering between -10°C and 5°C. The chill usually lasts well into mid-March; just in time for the '''Navruz''' holiday. Spring usually lasts around a month and a half and is usually one of the best times to visit. Summer arrives quickly, however, with temperatures reaching as high as 45°C by August. Luckily, it's a dry heat (rainfall and humidity are practically negligible) so walking around the city isn't too much of a burden. Get in Usually people travel to the regional capital of Urgench, whether it's by air, train, or taxi, and then take a taxi to Khiva. With the exception of flying where the rates are fixed (most of the time) you might be subject to ticket agents at the train or bus stations charging you a bit higher for a fare because you look like a tourist. Ask a guide or local for correct information, as Uzbeks are usually willing to assist you in getting the correct price. You will, however, be expected to haggle for the price of your cab everywhere, with the unusual exception of the taxi from the Urgench bazaar to Khiva (see "by car"). * WikiPedia:Khiva Commons:Category:Khiva Dmoz:Regional Asia Uzbekistan Localities Khiva


books international

). Uzbekistan Airways operates twice daily flights from Tashkent (operated by RJ-85, AN-24 or YAK-40, flying time 1:30 hrs) and a flight on Saturday (operated by B-757, flying time 1:40 hr, return flight on Sundays). Flights (as July 2008) were about 105 000 sum for return ticket and about 75 000 sum (€ 39,-) for a single ticket. You can also reach Urgench on Fridays on Uzbekistan Airways via Domodedovo International Airport in Moscow. Taxis from Urgench Airport to Khiva are about 7 000 sum one way. By train Trains from Tashkent leave twice a week and make the 19 hour journey across the desert to Urgench, with one major stop along the way in Samarkand. Trains leave Tashkent on Mon, Wed and Sun at 6:15PM and arrive in Urgench at 1:45PM next day. Depending on the class, you can get a 2-bunk ''coupy'' for 41 000 sum, a 4-bunk shared ''coupy'' for 25 000 sum, or you can rough it in ''plaskartnyy'' (hard-class) for the bargain price of 16 000 sum. The price for a place in a sleeping car is 50 000 UZS one way (2008). Taxis from Urgench Railway Station to Khiva are about 7 000 UZS one way. For the trolley bus see below. If you want to get a train on other days you can leave from arrive to Turkul, which is a 20 minutes taxi ride to Urgench. By bus If you're really budgeting your cash, you can catch a bus to Urgench from the Hippodrome station in Tashkent. The good news is the journey doesn't take much longer than the train (20 hours) and is only about 7000 sum. The bad news is you'll be sitting in a cramped space without toilets (the driver decides when to make a pit stop) and minimal ventilation (forget about air conditioning). There are daily busses from Bukhara to Urgench, leaving from Bukhara Avtovoksal. The buses have no air conditioning. The journey time is about 8 hours and the price about 10.000 UZS one way. There is no fixed timetable, the buses leave, when all seats are occupied. As at April 2012, the road between Bukhara and Urgench is in fairly poor condition and the bus journey can take up to 10 hours. Uzbek buses are not permitted to drive after 10PM so a bus leaving after 12 may have to make an overnight stop before reaching Bukhara, which will be at a restaurant. Passengers can sleep on the bus. Collective taxis from Urgench to Khiva leave from Urgench Bazaar near the Dynamo Stadium. The taxis leave when all seats are occupied and the price is about UZS 1.000 one way. Taxis will drop you at the Northern Gate of Khiva Old Town. There is one bus per day, at noon, going directly from Khiva to Tashkent through Bukhara and Samarkand. Leaving from Koy-Darvoza gate (GPS 41°22'37.1"N, 060°22'15.8"E), which is on the east part of Ichon-Qala (just exit through the East gate and keep on straight until you reach another gate). The prices in UZS are: 35.000 to Bukhara, 40.000 to Samarkand, 50.000 to Tashkent. Sep 2012 By car Inter-city "taxi" services are essentially a collection of informal drivers who wait to fill up their cars with passengers and then drive them off to their destinations. They usually charge per passenger; however, you can buy all the seats in a car (typically 1 in the front and 3 in the back) if you're willing to spend the cash. From Bukhara, the next closest Silk Road site, the 460km trip in a shared taxi should cost between 60000-80000 sum per person as of Sept. 2012 . The price can sometimes depend on the type of vehicle you're negotiating for, with Daewoo Ticos (similar to Ford Fiesta) costing less and Daewoo Nexia and Matiz brands (similar to Honda Accord) costing a bit more. One you reach Urgench, you can either negotiate for a local taxi to take you directly to Khiva, which usually costs about 8000 sum for the entire car. A cheaper way is to negotiate a ride to the western side of the Urgench Bazaar (inner-city trips shouldn't cost you more than 1500 sum at the most). There you'll find the official Khiva taxi stand, which is a row of Daewoo Tico and Matiz brand vehicles all in a line. On average, it takes between 10-15 minutes for a car to fill up and the cost is about 1000 sum per person, flat. '''Trolleybus''': An interesting (and cheap) way to get to Khiva from Urgench is via the trolleybus, which you can pick up near the Urgench Bazaar. At 700 sum, it's a bargain and it allows you to see the countryside between Urgench and Khiva at a snail's pace. It will also drop you off right in front of the northern gate of the Ichon-Kala with the rest of the taxicabs. Trolleybusses leave Urgench every 30 minutes during daytime and the journey takes about 60 minutes. Khiva is about 1390 km from Andizhan, 470 km from Bukhara, 1370 km from Fergana, 630 km from Karshi, 740 km from Samarkand, 1270 km from Kokand, 200 km from Nukus, 750 km from Shakhrisabz, 1020 km from Tashkent and 850 km from Termez. Get around Cabs don't run in the Ichon Qala, so walking from sight to sight is your only choice! Since the city is so compact, it's very easy to take a leisurely stroll around the city. Outside the walls, Khiva is still a very walkable city. You can access the main bazaar, either


significant site

in hushed tones) that if Khiva didn't have a rivalry with nearby Bukhara, it would not be the significant site that it is today. In the 19th century only a strong central power was created and taxes and money were introduced. For a long period of time Khiva was one of the most important markets of slaves in Central Asia. Slavery. however, was formally abolished during the October Revolution of 1917 only. Khiva with its 94 mosques and 63 mederssahs is considered as an important center of Islam. Because of this significance, Khiva was recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1990. Climate Khiva almost has a two-season climate; with slivers of spring and fall in between frigid winters and blazing hot summers. It starts to get uncomfortably cold in Khiva by November, with temperatures hovering between -10°C and 5°C. The chill usually lasts well into mid-March; just in time for the '''Navruz''' holiday. Spring usually lasts around a month and a half and is usually one of the best times to visit. Summer arrives quickly, however, with temperatures reaching as high as 45°C by August. Luckily, it's a dry heat (rainfall and humidity are practically negligible) so walking around the city isn't too much of a burden. Get in Usually people travel to the regional capital of Urgench, whether it's by air, train, or taxi, and then take a taxi to Khiva. With the exception of flying where the rates are fixed (most of the time) you might be subject to ticket agents at the train or bus stations charging you a bit higher for a fare because you look like a tourist. Ask a guide or local for correct information, as Uzbeks are usually willing to assist you in getting the correct price. You will, however, be expected to haggle for the price of your cab everywhere, with the unusual exception of the taxi from the Urgench bazaar to Khiva (see "by car"). * WikiPedia:Khiva Commons:Category:Khiva Dmoz:Regional Asia Uzbekistan Localities Khiva


historic architectural

and Karakalpakstan Ancient Khiva is one of three most important tourism centers of Uzbekistan with great historical cultural and ethnographic potential. The territory of the Khorezm Province and Karakalpakstan is strewn with plenty of natural, historic, architectural and archeological sites. The Khorezm Province itself possesses near to 300 historic monuments. '''Khiva''' (Uzbek: Xiva, Хива


large blue

Dichan Kala, was formerly protected by a wall with 11 gates. The inner town, or Itchan Kala, is encircled by brick walls, whose foundations are believed to have been laid in the 10th century. Present-day crenellated walls date back to the late 17th century and attain the height of 10 meters. The large blue tower in the central city square was supposed to be a minaret, but the Khan died and the succeeding Khan did not complete it; perhaps he realized that if completed, the minaret would overlook his harem and the muezzin would be able to see the Khan's wives. Construction was thus halted and the minaret remains unfinished to this day. The old town retains more than 50 historic monuments and 250 old houses, mostly dating from the 18th or the 19th centuries. Djuma Mosque, for instance, was established in the 10th century and rebuilt in 1788-89, although its celebrated hypostyle hall still retains 112 columns taken from ancient structures. It also is the site of the Sheikh Mukhtar-Vali Complex, a mausoleum nominated for World Heritage status in 1996. UNESCO World Heritage Centre "Complex of Sheikh Mukhtar-Vali (mausoleum)". Retrieved April 7, 2012. thumb 700px center City wall (File:Chiwa_city_wall.jpg) Sister cities * WikiPedia:Khiva Commons:Category:Khiva Dmoz:Regional Asia Uzbekistan Localities Khiva


current water

''' and '''Moynaq''' - If ecological disasters interest you, then checking out the Aral Sea should be high on your list. Once the 4th largest saline body of water in the world, the Aral Sea has steadily diminished over the last 50 years due to past Soviet agricultural planning and current water management practices by several Central Asian countries. Moynaq, once a thriving fishing town, now sits about 250km from the current coastline and is a haunting reminder of the environmental devastation. * ''' Urgench


major historical

Khodja lat long directions next to the Islam Khoja minaret phone tollfree fax hours price ~71 000 som (single) ~100 000 som (double) checkin checkout content Like the Orient Star, this hotel is one of the newer ones in Khiva and sits right near the center of the major historical structures. Along with a restaurant and bar, the Malika Kheivak is one of the few hotels in Khiva with internet access. There is a nice view on Khiva Old Town from the roof terrace


academic international

''' - Muhammad Khudayar Khan, Khan of Kokand (1853–1858) Central Asia The batman was used in Central Asia up until at least the 18th century. . In Khiva in 1740, there were said to be two batmans (as in Persia


important buildings

used to live here. This is why we find the most important buildings in the Itchan Kala. The ordinary people, small merchants, craftsmen and peasants lived in Dishan Kala. There were wells in Itchan Kala, whereas people had to draw drinking water from the irrigation channels in Dishan Kala. In the north western part of Itchan Kala is the well, where according to the legend the city was founded by Sem. * WikiPedia:Khiva Commons:Category:Khiva Dmoz:Regional Asia Uzbekistan Localities Khiva


including friendship

tiles with floral motives in white against a dark or light blue background. Dichon-Qala'(Dishan Kala) The '''Dichon-Qala''' and surrounding areas contain only a handful of historical sights, but still have some interesting attractions including Friendship Park, Independence Square, as well as a long stretch of ancient secondary wall that snakes it's way around the outskirts of the city. Do *

Khiva

'''Khiva''' ( ) is a city of approximately 50,000 people located in Xorazm Province, Uzbekistan. According to archaeological data, the city was established in the beginning of the current era. В. А. Булатова, И. И. Ноткин, Архитектурные памятники Хивы. (Путеводитель), Ташкент, 1972; Хива. (Архитектура. Фотоальбом), Л., 1973; Г. Пугаченкова, Термез, Шахрисябз, Хива, (М„ 1976). It is the former capital of Khwarezmia and the Khanate of Khiva. Itchan Kala in Khiva was the first site in Uzbekistan to be inscribed in the World Heritage List (1991).

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