Kherson

What is Kherson known for?


picturesque landscape

their projects in the picturesque landscape that many Ukrainian cities and regions offered. St. Andrew's Church of Kiev (1747–1754), built by Bartolomeo Rastrelli, is a notable example of Baroque architecture, and its location on top of the Kievan mountain made it a recognizable monument of the city. An equally notable contribution of Rasetrelli was the Mariyinsky Palace, which was built to be a summer residence to Russian Empress Elizabeth (Elizabeth of Russia). During


large deep

of national significance, passing through Odessa, include the M16 Highway to Moldova, M15 to Izmail and Romania, and the M14 (Highway M14 (Ukraine)) which runs from Odessa, through Mykolaiv and Kherson to Ukraine's eastern border with Russia. The M14 is of particular importance to Odessa's maritime and shipbuilding industries as it links the city with Ukraine's other large deep water port Mariupol which is located in the south east of the county. * Dnieper River


national technical

* Kherson state university * Kherson national technical university * International University of Business and Law Main sights * The Church of St. Catherine (St. Catherine's Cathedral (Kherson)) was built in the 1780s, supposedly to Ivan Starov's designs, and contains the tomb of Prince Potemkin. * Jewish cemetery – Kershon has a large Jewish community which was established in the mid 19th century.


acting debut

, Adler took a leave of absence from his job to travel with Rosenberg's troupe to Kherson, where he made a successful acting debut as the lover Marcus in ''The Witch of Botoşani''. He overstayed his leave, lost his government post, and the decision to become a full-time actor was effectively made for him. Adler 1999 p.107, 111 Adler was unhappy that under Tulya Goldfaden there were "No more communistic (communism) shares, no more idealistic comradeship". Still, under this same Goldfaden regime he had his first taste of real stardom when people in Chişinău camped in the courtyards awaiting performances. Even the police seemed to have "fallen in love" with the troupe, dressing up the actors in their uniforms at riotous parties after shows, while trying on the troupe's costumes themselves. Adler 1999 p.124 thumb left Afanasy Fet as a Russian army officer (File:Afanasy fet army years.jpg) In 1844 Fet graduated from the University. This year he had to suffer two more heavy blows. First his uncle Pyotr Neofitovich Shenshin died. A large sum of money he prepared to transfer to the young man after his death has never been found. Later that year, after long suffering, mother Charlotta died of cancer. Early next year Afanasy Fet left Novosyolky estate forever: he went to the Kherson gubernia and on April 21, following the tradition of Shenshins, joined the Imperial Cuirassier regiment as a junior officer. Fet's goal was to retrieve the name and all the privileges of nobility he'd lost with it, and he indeed started to progress in ranking but the process was too slow: the nobility granting bar was being continuously risen too. In Kherson, a granary was adapted into a theater by a wealthy retired soldier, Lipitz Beygun, who even imported first-rate scenery from Spain. Here they acquired a new prompter, Avrom Zetzer—whom Adler describes as a "learned" man who had previously fulfilled the same function for Goldfaden in Romania— and virtuoso Zorach Vinyavich became leader of their orchestra; Vinyavich's 16-year-old daughter Bettye also joined the troupe to play juvenile roles. Adler, 1999, 105-107 16-35%: Don (Don River (Russia)) Ekaterinoslav Kharkov Kherson Kuban Perm Tiflis Vologda Voronezh Jacob Adler (Jacob Pavlovich Adler) made his 1878 stage debut in the role of the lover Marcus, in a production in Kherson, Ukraine, in which Israel Rosenberg played the title role. Adler, 1999, 107 Sokrates Starynkiewicz was born December 18, 1820 in Taganrog at the Azov Sea, to the family of Ivan Starynkiewicz, a bank owner. In 1836 he joined the Imperial Russian (Russian Empire) army and graduated from several engineering and artillery schools. After promotion to officer rank he served in various staff posts. Among others, he took part in the Hungarian Campaign and Crimean War, for which he was promoted to colonel in 1858. In 1863, during the January Uprising he was retired. Soon afterwards he was promoted to major general and assigned to the Russian Ministry of Interior. Between 1868 and 1871 he was briefly the military governor of Kherson, but he left that post and became the governor of Prince Anatoliy Demidov's estates near Kiev and in Podolia. Earliest mails The earliest mail service between St Petersburg and Constantinople consisted of diplomatic pouches carried from 1721 on. The Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca in 1774 provided for a regular mail service, for which a consular post office was established in Constantinople. It began using handstamped postal markings around 1830. Beginning in 1779 a mail boat circulated between Constantinople and Kherson, and 1781 saw the establishment of an overland route through Bucharest to Bratzlav. Transportation The Zaporizhia transportation system includes roadway, rail, river and air options for passenger and freight transit. Public city transport includes buses, minivans, trams, trolleybuses and railways. The city has two railway stations, Zaporizhia-the-First and Zaporizhia-the-Second. The First is the central station. It is located in the southern part of the city and is a part of the "north-south" transit route Simferopol-Moscow. The line of the Zaporizhia-the-Second station connects the Donbass coalfield with Kryvoi Rog (Kryvyi Rih) iron ore site. Two river ports connect Kiev to Kherson and cutter boats (Cutter (boat)) travel between Zaporizhia and nearby villages. The city's sole airport (Zaporizhia International Airport) includes both domestic and international flights. New cities founded during colonization included Novorossiysk, Yekaterinoslav (now Dnipropetrovsk), Nikolaev, Kherson, and Odessa. Also the cities such as Mariupol and Staryi Krym (Donetsk oblast) that were founded on national basis reflect the ethnic composition in the region. Administration Upon creation, the territory of the host was governed by the military government. Later, a dedicated military executive office was created, which was headed by the host's ataman. In military matters, this office was subordinated to Kherson's military governor and, since 1802, to the Crimean Inspectorate. In civil matters, the office was subordinated to the Governor of Taurida Governorate. After having advanced to the Danube, the Russians formed the Danube Military Flotilla for the purpose of guarding the Danube estuary. In 1773 the vessels of the Azov Flotilla (created anew in 1771) sailed out into the Black Sea. The Russo-Turkish War of 1768-1774 ended victoriously for Russia, which gained the coasts of the Sea of Azov and a part of the Black Sea coastline between the rivers Bug (Southern Bug) and Dniester. The Crimea was pronounced independent under Russia's protectorate and would become a part of Russia in 1783. In 1778, the Russians founded the port of Kherson. It is in this city that the first battleship of the Black Sea Fleet was commissioned in 1783. A year later, it was already a squadron. In 1900, its 21,282 inhabitants were Ukrainians, Jews and Mennonites, who carry on agriculture and shipbuilding. The old Sich, or fortified camp of the Zaporozhian Cossacks, brilliantly described in N. V. Gogol (Nikolai Gogol)'s novel Taras Bulba (1834), was situated a little higher up the river. Numbers of graves in the vicinity recall the battles which were fought for the possession of this important strategic point. One of them, close to the town, contained, along with other Scythian antiquities, the well-known precious vase representing the capture of wild horses. Even now Nikopol, which is situated on the highway from Dnipropetrovsk to Kherson, is the point where the "salt-highway" of the Chumaks (Ukrainian salt-carriers) to the Crimea crosses the Dnieper. Nikopol is, further, one of the chief places on the lower Dnieper for the export of corn, linseed, hemp and wool. * Wikipedia:Kherson


title role

made his 1878 stage debut in the role of the lover Marcus, in a production in Kherson, Ukraine, in which Israel Rosenberg played the title role. Adler, 1999, 107 Sokrates Starynkiewicz was born December 18, 1820 in Taganrog at the Azov Sea, to the family of Ivan Starynkiewicz, a bank owner. In 1836 he joined the Imperial Russian (Russian Empire) army and graduated from several engineering and artillery schools. After promotion to officer rank he served in various staff


innovative metal

). *Spacious elongated shop galleries, bridged with innovative metal-and-glass vaults, notably the Upper Trade Rows on Red Square (1889–94), Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts (Pushkin Museum) (1898–1912) and Petrovka Passage (1903–06). References thumb 190px Hyperboloid structure Hyperboloid (File:Adziogol hyperboloid Lighthouse by Vladimir Shukhov 1911.jpg) Adziogol Lighthouse by V.G.Shukhov near Kherson, Ukraine, 1911 File:Soviet Union-1963-stamp-Vladimir


study history

was also my own liberation from philistinism" ("Революция была также и моим освобождением от мещанства"). Tarle was born in Ukraine in a Jewish family on 8 November 1874. His father was a government official. He completed Gymnasium in Kherson in 1892 and afterward entered the University of Kiev to study history and philosophy. He was “the most distinguished student of Ivan Vasilevich Luchitski (1845-1918) of the University of Kiev.” After


innovative

Crimea was annexed by the Russian Empire, Ushakov personally supervised the construction of a naval base in Sevastopol and the building of docks in Kherson. During the Second Russo-Turkish War (Russo-Turkish War, 1787-1792) he brilliantly defeated the Turks at Fidonisi (Battle of Fidonisi), Kerch Strait (Battle of Kerch Strait), Tendra (Battle of Tendra), and Cape Kaliakra (Battle of Cape Kaliakra). In these battles, he demonstrated the excellence of his innovative doctrines

). *Spacious elongated shop galleries, bridged with innovative metal-and-glass vaults, notably the Upper Trade Rows on Red Square (1889–94), Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts (Pushkin Museum) (1898–1912) and Petrovka Passage (1903–06). References thumb 190px Hyperboloid structure Hyperboloid (File:Adziogol hyperboloid Lighthouse by Vladimir Shukhov 1911.jpg) Adziogol Lighthouse by V.G.Shukhov near Kherson, Ukraine, 1911 File:Soviet Union-1963-stamp-Vladimir

structures led to his invention of a new system that was innovative both structurally and spatially. By applying his analytical skills to the doubly curved surfaces Nikolai Lobachevsky named "hyperbolic", Shukhov derived a family of equations that led to new structural and constructional systems, known as hyperboloids of revolution (hyperboloid of revolution) and hyperbolic paraboloids. Participation in the Holocaust The ''Schutzmannschaft'' became an indispensable component


significant buildings

", a largely fictional method of ruse involving the construction of painted façades to mimic real villages. Potemkin was known for his love of women, gambling and material wealth; he oversaw the construction of many historically significant buildings, including the Tauride Palace in St. Petersburg. A century after Potemkin's death, his name was given to the Battleship ''Potemkin'' (Russian battleship Potemkin), which featured in the 1905 Russian Revolution and was fictionalized in ''The Battleship Potemkin'' by Sergey Eisenstein. Builder Potemkin then embarked on a period of city-founding. Construction started at his first effort, Kherson, in 1778, as a base for a new Black Sea Fleet he intended to build. Wikipedia:Kherson


building industry

After that moment, although branded "enemy of the people", Rakovsky was still occasionally allowed to speak in public (notably, together with Kamenev and Karl Radek, to the Moscow Komsomol), and continued to criticize Stalin's leadership as "bureaucratic socialism" (''see Bureaucratic collectivism'') and "social fascism (Social fascism theory)". Fagan, ''Opposition and Exile''; Victor Kravchenko (Victor Kravchenko (defector)), ''I Chose Freedom'', Transaction Publishers, Somerset, New Jersey, 1988, p.51-52. ISBN 978-0-88738-754-8; Tismăneanu, p.61-62 With Nikolai Krestinsky (who split with the group soon afterwards) and Kamenev, he attempted to organize a substantial opposition, visiting Ukraine for this purpose, hosting public meetings and printing manifestos addressed to the workers in Kiev, Kharkiv, Mykolaiv, Odessa, Dnipropetrovsk, Kherson, and Zaporizhia (he was assisted by, among others, Yuri Kotsubinsky). Fagan, ''Opposition and Exile'' He was persistently heckled (Heckler) during public appearances, and his supporters were beaten up by the ''Militsiya''. Fagan, ''Opposition and Exile''; Tănase, "The Renegade Istrati" *Zagreb in Croatia on 5 January 2009 *Kherson in Ukraine on 27 May 2009 *Kieler Woche in Germany on 19 June 2009 Biography Born in the village of Vyritsa in Saint Petersburg Governorate on April 9 (22), 1908. His parents divorced during the Russian Revolution (Russian Revolution (1917)). His mother married a Red Army commander and left the children in Kherson to be cared for by an aunt who soon died of typhus. Yefremov survived on his own for some time then joined a Red Army unit as a "son of the regiment" and reached Perekop with it. In 1921, he was discharged and went to Petrograd (today's Saint Petersburg) to study. He completed his school education there while combining his studies with a variety of odd jobs. He later commented that "the Revolution was also my own liberation from philistinism" ("Революция была также и моим освобождением от мещанства"). Tarle was born in Ukraine in a Jewish family on 8 November 1874. His father was a government official. He completed Gymnasium in Kherson in 1892 and afterward entered the University of Kiev to study history and philosophy. He was “the most distinguished student of Ivan Vasilevich Luchitski (1845-1918) of the University of Kiev.” After finishing his undergraduate education at the University of Kiev, he

About 350,000 people live in Kherson, many of whom work in the extensive ship-building industry and harbour activities. Get in thumb Potyomkin Monument (File:Памятник Потёмкину (Херсон).jpg) The city is well reachable by train, with connections to Dnipropetrovsk, Simferopol, Charkiw and Moscow. It's served by Kherson International Airport, but other useful airports in the region are Odessa Airport, Kisinev Airport (best reached via

Kherson

'''Kherson''' ( ) is a city in southern Ukraine. It is the administrative center (Capital city) of the Kherson Oblast (province (Oblast)), and is designated as its own separate raion (district) within the oblast. Kherson is an important port on the Black Sea and Dnieper River, and the home of a major ship-building industry. Estimated population as of 2007 was 329,000.

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