Kharkiv

What is Kharkiv known for?


young years

Wikipedia:Kharkiv Commons:Category:Kharkiv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Kharkiv Oblast Kharkiv


stone construction

monastery alt Свято-Покровський монастир url email address 8 Universytetska St lat 49.9916 long 36.2290 directions In centre - M Radianska phone hours price content Built in begin 17th-end 19th century, the oldest stone construction in Kharkiv and a monument of architecture of national significance. Ukrainian Baroque combined with Roman and Old-Russian motifs. Founded by the Cossacks, the Cathedral was erected in 1689 as part of the fortifications. The complex include


called fast

here depart express trains to Simferopol 7 hours, Kiev, 5 hours via Poltava 2 hours. - To Kiev is a direct overnight train service (87UAH, 8½ to 10 hours). To Donetsk (70UAH, 6½ to eight hours, six a day) and 1 so-calledfast elektrychka’ (electric train) with airplane-style seating (38UAH, 5½ hours). There’s also a fast elektrychka to Dnipropetrovsk (25UAH, 4½ hours) along with a host of regular trains (35UAH, 6 hours), Odesa (100UAH, 14 hours, twice a day). *


special experimental

, the Capella was chosen by the People's Commissariat for Education to work with bandura specialist Hnat Khotkevych to form a special experimental studio for the development of bandura technique and repertoire. The members switched over to diatonic Kharkiv instruments made by Poltava bandura maker - Hryhory Paliyevetz. The Capella had its name changed to the "Exemplary Bandura Studio of UKRFIL". Siemiradzki's artistic career Siemiradzki was born to a Polish (Poland) noble szlachta family of a military physician, Hipolit Siemiradzki, and Michalina (nee Prószyńska) Mgr. (Magister (degree)) Paweł Dudek, Henryk Siemiradzki, including Bibliography. ''Jan Długosz University'', 2011 ''Histmag.org'' in the village of Bilhorod (Białogród), Tomasz Rozum, Henryk Hektor Siemiradzki. ''Magazyn INFORMATOR''. No. 89, 2006. or Novobelgorod (now Pechenegi, sources vary) near the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv under the Russian Empire. His parents were close friends with Adam Mickiewicz's family. Henryk Siemiradzki studied at Kharkiv Gymnasium (Gymnasium (school)) where he first learned painting under the local school teacher, D.I. Besperchy, former student of Karl Briullov. He entered the Physics-Mathematics School of Kharkov University and studied natural sciences there with great interest, but also continued to paint. DATE OF BIRTH 15 November 1843 PLACE OF BIRTH near Kharkiv, Ukraine DATE OF DEATH 23 August 1902 Biography Malko was born in Brailiv, Vinnytsia oblast, Ukraine. His father was Ukrainian, his mother Russian. In 1906 he completed his studies in history and philology at Saint Petersburg University (Saint Petersburg State University). In 1909 he graduated from the Saint Petersburg Conservatory, where he had included Rimsky-Korsakov (Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov), Glazunov (Alexander Glazunov) and Lyadov (Anatoly Lyadov) among his teachers. He published articles on music criticism in the Russian press and performed as a pianist and later a conductor. In 1909 he became a conductor at the Mariinsky Theatre and, six years later, the head conductor there. From 1909 he studied conducting in Munich under Felix Mottl. In 1918 he became the director of the conservatory in Vitebsk and from 1921 taught at the Moscow Conservatory. From 1921 to 1924 he shuttled between Vitebsk, Moscow, Kiev and Kharkiv, conducting in each of these cities. In 1925 he became a professor of the Leningrad Conservatory. He became conductor of the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra in 1926 and conducted the world première of the Symphony No. 1 (Symphony No. 1 (Shostakovich)) by his pupil Dmitri Shostakovich that same year, and the premiere of Shostakovitch's Symphony No. 2 (Symphony No. 2 (Shostakovich)), dedicated to him, in 1927. Malko also conducted the premiere of Nikolai Myaskovsky's 5th Symphony (Symphony No. 5 (Myaskovsky)). Wikipedia:Kharkiv Commons:Category:Kharkiv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Kharkiv Oblast Kharkiv


great tradition

at Kharkiv, Lyapunov writes in his autobiography: * Linz, Austria The Landau School Apart from his theoretical accomplishments, Landau was the principal founder of a great tradition of theoretical physics in Kharkov, Soviet Union (now Kharkiv, Ukraine), sometimes referred to as the "Landau school". He was the head of the Theoretical


vocal range

) Faust '' and became the prima donna lyric soprano of that opera theater. In 1929, she and bass (Bass (vocal range)) Ivan Patorzhynsky, representative singer from the Ukraine, went on a concert tour to Germany and Italy. Pavlo Virsky was born on February 25, 1905 in Odessa, at the time part of the Russian Empire (in present-day Ukraine). After graduating from the Odessa Music and Drama School in 1927, he continued his studies in Moscow, at the Theater


shevchenko

Oblast administration building, Bottom centre: Choral Synagogue (Kharkiv Choral Synagogue), Bottom right: Taras Shevchenko Monument image_flag Kharkiv-town-flag.svg image_shield Kharkiv-town-herb.svg shield_size 90px image_blank_emblem KharkivSmartCity.jpg image_map Charkiw-Ukraine-Map.png nickname The First Capital of Ukrainian SSR, Первая столица. АТН, 19 декабря 2002 г.

The Kharkiv Conservatory is in the city. Landmarks Of the many attractions of the Kharkiv city are the: Derzhprom building, Memorial Complex, Freedom Square (Freedom Square, Kharkiv), Taras Shevchenko Monument, Mirror Stream, Dormition Cathedral (Assumption Cathedral, Kharkiv), Historical Museum, Choral Synagogue (Kharkov Choral Synagogue), Annunciation Cathedral (Annunciation Cathedral, Kharkiv), T. Shevchenko Gardens, Zoo, Children's narrow-gauge

)'' - style "vertical-align:top;" Monuments and memorials There are many monuments to Shevchenko throughout Ukraine, most notably at his memorial in Kaniv and in the center of Kiev, just across from the Kiev University that bears his name. The Kiev Metro station, Tarasa Shevchenka (Tarasa Shevchenka (Kiev Metro)), is also dedicated to Shevchenko. Among other notable monuments to the poet located throughout Ukraine are the ones in Kharkiv (in front of the Shevchenko


quot studies

in Pyatykhatky (Piatykhatky, Kharkiv) forest (part of the Katyn massacre) on the outskirts of Kharkiv. Fischer, Benjamin B. (Benjamin B. Fischer), "The Katyn Controversy: Stalin's Killing Field", ''Studies in Intelligence'', Winter 1999–2000, last accessed on 10 December, 2005 The site also contains the numerous bodies of Ukrainian cultural workers who were arrested


leadership development

to organize a Scout Troop for the young men, 19 years and older, which was a common practice within the Hungarian Scout Association (Magyar Cserkészszövetség) at the time. Bánáthy found a passion in training the young men in officer's leadership skills and became the voluntary national director for youth leadership development and a member of the National Council of the Hungarian Scout Association. Life Landis was born in Kharkiv, Ukrainian SSR, Soviet Union. He studied and worked at the Moscow State University, where his advisor was Alexander Kronrod, and later Ivan Petrovsky. In 1946, together with Kronrod, he rediscovered Sard's lemma unknown in Russia at the time. Overview The vocabulary mix of each of the languages (Ukrainian and Russian) varies greatly with location, or sometimes even from person to person, depending on the level of education, personal experience, rural or urban residence, origin of interlocutors, etc. The percentage of Russian words and phonetic influences tends to gradually increase in the east and south and around big Russian-speaking cities. It is commonly spoken in most of eastern Ukraine's rural areas, with the exception of the large metropolitan areas of Donetsk, Kharkiv, Luhansk, and especially Crimea, where the majority of the population uses standard Russian. In rural areas of western Ukraine, the language spoken contains fewer Russian elements than in central and eastern Ukraine but has nonetheless been influenced by Russian. nationality Soviet (Soviet people) birth_place Kharkiv, Ukrainian SSR, USSR death_place Moscow, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Education and military training Bondarenko was born in Kharkiv, Ukrainian SSR, USSR. His father was a furrier and was sent to the Eastern Front (Eastern Front (World War II)) in the first days of World War II. The youngster and his mother went through several years of privation during the 1941–1944. DATE OF BIRTH 16 February 1937 PLACE OF BIRTH Kharkiv, Ukrainian SSR, USSR DATE OF DEATH 23 March 1961 After a brief truce, the Bolsheviks realized that the Rada had no intention of supporting the Bolshevik Revolution. They re-organized into an All-Ukrainian Council of Soviets in December 1917 in an attempt to seize power. When that failed due to the Bolsheviks' relative lack of popularity in Kiev, they moved to Kharkiv. The Bolsheviks of Ukraine declared the government of the Ukrainian People's Republic outlaw and proclaimed the Ukrainian People's Republic of Soviets (Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic) with capital in Kiev, claiming that the government of the People's Secretaries of Ukraine (People's Secretariat) was the only government in the country. The Bolshevik Red Army entered Ukraine from the Russian SFSR in support of the local Soviet government. As the relationships between members within the Tsentralna Rada soured, a series of regional Soviet republics on the territory of Ukraine proclaimed their independence and allegiance to the Petrograd sovnarkom (Odessa Soviet Republic (southern Ukraine), Donetsk-Krivoi Rog Soviet Republic (eastern Ukraine)). The Donetsk-Kryvoi Rog Republic was created by a direct decree of Lenin as part of the Russian SFSR with its capital in Kharkiv. That decree was successfully implemented by Fyodor Sergeyev who became the chairman of the local government as well as joining the Soviet government of Ukraine, simultaneously. Unlike ''Fyodor Sergeyev's'' Republic, the Odessa Republic was not recognized by any other Bolshevik governments and on its own initiative had entered a military conflict with Romania for control over the Moldavian Democratic Republic, whose territory it was contesting. After a brief truce, the Bolsheviks realized that the Rada had no intention of supporting the Bolshevik Revolution. They re-organized into an All-Ukrainian Council of Soviets in December 1917 in an attempt to seize power. When that failed due to the Bolsheviks' relative lack of popularity in Kiev, they moved to Kharkiv. The Bolsheviks of Ukraine declared the government of the Ukrainian People's Republic outlaw and proclaimed the Ukrainian People's Republic of Soviets (Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic) with capital in Kiev, claiming that the government of the People's Secretaries of Ukraine (People's Secretariat) was the only government in the country. The Bolshevik Red Army entered Ukraine from the Russian SFSR in support of the local Soviet government. As the relationships between members within the Tsentralna Rada soured, a series of regional Soviet republics on the territory of Ukraine proclaimed their independence and allegiance to the Petrograd sovnarkom (Odessa Soviet Republic (southern Ukraine), Donetsk-Krivoi Rog Soviet Republic (eastern Ukraine)). The Donetsk-Kryvoi Rog Republic was created by a direct decree of Lenin as part of the Russian SFSR with its capital in Kharkiv. That decree was successfully implemented by Fyodor Sergeyev who became the chairman of the local government as well as joining the Soviet government of Ukraine, simultaneously. Unlike ''Fyodor Sergeyev's'' Republic, the Odessa Republic was not recognized by any other Bolshevik governments and on its own initiative had entered a military conflict with Romania for control over the Moldavian Democratic Republic, whose territory it was contesting. *Colonel (ret.) Oleksandr Halaka (March 13, 2003 - January 17, 2008) :Born in Kharkiv 1955. Graduated from the Military Academy of Ground Forces Air-Defense in 1987 and the Kiev University in 2000. *Lieutenant-General Viktor Hvozd (January 17, 2008 - August 17, 2010) ; Wikipedia:Kharkiv Commons:Category:Kharkiv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Kharkiv Oblast Kharkiv


building massive

the current city center of Khreshchatyk and Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square) were not the obvious choices. Some of the early, ultimately not materialised, ideas included a part of Pechersk (Pechersk, Kiev), Lypky, European Square (European Square, Kiev) and Mykhailivska Square. The plans of building massive monuments (of Vladimir Lenin and Joseph Stalin) where also abandoned; due to lack of money (in the 1930s-1950s) and because of Kiev's hilly landscape. Experiencing rapid population growth between the 1970s and the mid-1990s, the city has continued its consistent growth after the turn of the millennium. As a result, Kiev's central districts provide a dotted contrast of new, modern buildings amongst the pale yellows, blues and greys of older apartments. Urban sprawl has gradually reduced, while population densities of suburbs has increased. The most expensive properties are located in the Pechersk, and Khreshchatyk areas. It is also prestigious to own a property in newly constructed buildings in the Kharkivskyi Raion (Kharkivskyi neighborhood, Kiev) or Obolon (Obolon Raion) along the Dnieper. thumb right A public concert held on Maidan Nezalezhnosti (File:Esc 2005 concert on maidan.jpg) during Kiev's 2005 Eurovision Song Contest Buildings * Uspensky Cathedral (Uspensky Cathedral (Ukraine)) in Kharkiv, Ukraine is completed. * The Scott Monument in Edinburgh, Scotland is completed. Education Gidzenko graduated from the Higher Military Pilot School in Kharkiv in 1983. Gidzenko graduated from the Moscow State University of Geodesy and Cartography (MIIGAiK) in 1994 specializing in geodesy and cartography. After that moment, although branded "enemy of the people", Rakovsky was still occasionally allowed to speak in public (notably, together with Kamenev and Karl Radek, to the Moscow Komsomol), and continued to criticize Stalin's leadership as "bureaucratic socialism" (''see Bureaucratic collectivism'') and "social fascism (Social fascism theory)". Fagan, ''Opposition and Exile''; Victor Kravchenko (Victor Kravchenko (defector)), ''I Chose Freedom'', Transaction Publishers, Somerset, New Jersey, 1988, p.51-52. ISBN 978-0-88738-754-8; Tismăneanu, p.61-62 With Nikolai Krestinsky (who split with the group soon afterwards) and Kamenev, he attempted to organize a substantial opposition, visiting Ukraine for this purpose, hosting public meetings and printing manifestos addressed to the workers in Kiev, Kharkiv, Mykolaiv, Odessa, Dnipropetrovsk, Kherson, and Zaporizhia (he was assisted by, among others, Yuri Kotsubinsky). Fagan, ''Opposition and Exile'' He was persistently heckled (Heckler) during public appearances, and his supporters were beaten up by the ''Militsiya''. Fagan, ''Opposition and Exile''; Tănase, "The Renegade Istrati" Podgorny's position was constantly threatened by Brezhnev and his allies. In an article in ''Ekonomicheskaya Gazeta'' from February 1965, the newspaper criticised the Kharkiv Party organisation which Podgorny had previously headed, but also its management of the economy. By indirectly criticising Podgorny, the article raised doubts about his qualifications as a leading member of the Soviet leadership. Podgorny launched a counterattack in his 1965 speech in Baku, Azerbaijani Soviet Socialist Republic, were he criticised the Soviet leadership's heavy industrial policy (heavy industry). This, as it turned out, would be a move he would regret for life. Instead of offending just Brezhnev and Shelepin, he offended the whole conservative wing of the leadership. To make matters even worse for Podgorny, Mikhail Suslov, who had kept outside of the conflict, sided with Brezhnev, and called his views "revisionist". Later in 1965, Podgorny lost his seat in the Secretariat (Secretariat of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union), and on 9 December 1965 he replaced Mikoyan as Chairman (List of heads of state of the Soviet Union) of the Presidium (Presidium of the Supreme Soviet) of the Supreme Soviet (Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union). Wikipedia:Kharkiv Commons:Category:Kharkiv Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Kharkiv Oblast Kharkiv

Kharkiv

'''Kharkiv''' ( ), is the second-largest city of Ukraine. Located in the north-east of the country, it is the largest city of the Slobozhanshchyna (Sloboda Ukraine) historical region.

The city was founded in 1654 and was a major centre of Ukrainian culture in the Russian Empire. Kharkiv was the first city in Ukraine to acknowledge Soviet power in December 1917 and became the first capital of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic until January 1935, after which the capital was relocated to Kiev. Kharkiv is the administrative centre of Kharkiv Oblast and the surrounding Kharkiv district (Kharkivskyi Raion (Kharkiv Oblast)).

Kharkiv is a major cultural, scientific, educational, transport and industrial centre of Ukraine, with 60 scientific institutes, 30 establishments of higher education, 6 museums, 7 theatres and 80 libraries. Its industry specialises primarily in machinery and electronics. There are hundreds of industrial companies in the city. Among them are globally important giants like the Morozov Design Bureau and the Malyshev Tank Factory (leaders in world tank production in the 1930s through 1980s); Khartron (aerospace and nuclear electronics); and the Turboatom turbines producer.

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