Kafr Yasif

What is Kafr Yasif known for?


146

: books.google.com books?id riHMZiH_Te4C&pg PA146 146 At one point it was a ''casale'' of the Knights Hospitallers. It was described as part of the domain of the Crusaders during the ''hudna'' ("truce") between the Crusaders based in Acre (Acre, Israel) and the Mamluk (Mamluk Sultanate (Cairo)) sultan al-Mansur Qalawun (Qalawun) in 1283.

: www.archive.org stream surveyofwesternp01conduoft#page 146 mode 1up pp. 146-147 Conder and Kitchener, 1881, p. 169 According to the Palestine Exploration Fund's ''Survey of Western Palestine'', Kafr Yasif was a stone-built village surrounded by olive groves and arable land, and provided with water from cisterns. The population consisted of 300 Christians, who worshiped at the Greek Orthodox


stage+art

spurred the emergence of other hip hop groups from Akka, to Bethlehem, to Ramallah, to Gaza City. Murkus was born and raised in the Arab town of Kafr Yasif in Galilee, and has devoted her career to promoting Palestinian music and culture (Palestinian people#Culture) in Israel and abroad. Murkus has been performing since she was five years old. In 1979, she won first prize in the Israeli Arab children's song festival, and went on to graduate from the Institute for Stage Art in Tel Aviv in 1990. cit req


local team

communities of Israel. Firro, 1999, pp. 185-186. Kafr Yasif was the site of the first major violent incident between Christians and Druze in Israel on 11 April 1981. The clash began during a football match between fans of the town's local team and that of the nearby Druze village of Julis where a young male from Julis was fatally stabbed by a Christian from Kafr Yasif. Although reconciliation talks were immediately arranged to prevent further violence, the local council of Kafr Yasif refused to give up the name of the alleged killer. Hundreds of Druze youths from Julis subsequently entered Kafr Yasif, prompting the mayor to call for emergency back-up from the regional Israeli Police, a request which was denied. On 13 April about 60 armed police officers positioned themselves in the field between the two villages, and while a ''sulha'' (traditional Arab peace agreement) was being negotiated, Mansour, 2004, p. 275. a group of heavily armed Julis residents stormed the town, burning down 85 houses, 17 stores, a few workshops and 31 cars. A church was also damaged. McGahern, 2011, p. 162. By the end of the attack three residents of Kafr Yasif were shot dead and more were wounded. The police did not intervene, with some officers claiming they were not sufficiently armed. None of the attackers, which according to witnesses included some off-duty Druze soldiers from the Israeli Army (Israel Defense Forces), were arrested. McGahern, 2011, p. 163. Most of the compensation for the damage came from the Muslim ''waqf'' (Waqf) of Israel and a smaller portion from the World Council of Churches. McGahern, 2011, p. 164. Demographics Kafr Yasif's population was recorded as 1,057 in the 1931 census of Palestine. The population was 1,730 in 1950, of which 300 were internally displaced Palestinians. There was also a population of 60 Druzes. Firro, 1999, p. 141. In 1951 27% of Kafr Yasif's 1,930 inhabitants were internally displaced. Charles Kamen, The Arabs in Israel, 1948–1951, ''Middle Eastern Studies'', Vol. 23, No. 4 (1987), pp. 453-495. In the 1961 census there were 2,975 inhabitants (1,747 Christians, 1,138 Muslims and 90 Druzes). Betts, 1990, pp. 123–124 In 1995 the population was recorded as 6,700. In the 2009 census Kafr Yasif had a population of 8,700, with Christians accounting for 55% of the inhabitants, Muslims 40% and Druze 5%. McGahern, 2011, p. 46. Landmarks It is popular belief that the tomb of the monotheistic saint, al-Khadr is located in Kafr Yasif. The site is especially venerated by the Druze, some of whom make annual pilgrimages to the tomb on January 25. The structure is composed of a large convention hall adjacent to the tomb, along with rooms and courtyards that serve both pilgrims and other visitors. Dana, 2003, pp. 30–31 Al-Khadr is the Arabic (Arabic language) name for Saint George in Christianity. There are four churches and two mosques in the town. The main bishop of the town's Orthodox Christian community is Atallah Makhouli. Education and culture According to historian Atallah Mansour, Kafr Yasif is the "most academic Arab town in Israel." Mansour, 2004, p. 256. The Rabeah Murkus Dance Studio, Israel's first Arab dance studio, is located in Kafr Yasif. Rabeah Murkus, daughter of former Kafr Yasif mayor Nimr Murkus, also opened a dance study track for Arab high school students authorized by the Israeli Ministry of Education. The track serves 10th-12th graders in several Arab communities in northern Israel. In addition to the contribution of artists such as singer Amal Murkus (from Kafr Yasif) to evolving traditional Palestinian (Palestinian music) and Arabic music styles, a new generation of Arab youth in Israel has also begun asserting a Palestinian identity in new musical forms. For instance of the Palestinian hip hop group DAM (DAM (band)), from Lod, has spurred the emergence of other hip hop groups from Akka, to Bethlehem, to Ramallah, to Gaza City. Murkus was born and raised in the Arab town of Kafr Yasif in Galilee, and has devoted her career to promoting Palestinian music and culture (Palestinian people#Culture) in Israel and abroad. Murkus has been performing since she was five years old. In 1979, she won first prize in the Israeli Arab children's song festival, and went on to graduate from the Institute for Stage Art in Tel Aviv in 1990. cit req


dance+study

Makhouli. Education and culture According to historian Atallah Mansour, Kafr Yasif is the "most academic Arab town in Israel." Mansour, 2004, p. 256. The Rabeah Murkus Dance Studio, Israel's first Arab dance studio, is located in Kafr Yasif. Rabeah Murkus, daughter of former Kafr Yasif mayor Nimr Murkus, also opened a dance study track for Arab high school students authorized by the Israeli Ministry of Education. The track serves 10th-12th graders in several Arab communities in northern Israel. In addition to the contribution of artists such as singer Amal Murkus (from Kafr Yasif) to evolving traditional Palestinian (Palestinian music) and Arabic music styles, a new generation of Arab youth in Israel has also begun asserting a Palestinian identity in new musical forms. For instance of the Palestinian hip hop group DAM (DAM (band)), from Lod, has spurred the emergence of other hip hop groups from Akka, to Bethlehem, to Ramallah, to Gaza City. Murkus was born and raised in the Arab town of Kafr Yasif in Galilee, and has devoted her career to promoting Palestinian music and culture (Palestinian people#Culture) in Israel and abroad. Murkus has been performing since she was five years old. In 1979, she won first prize in the Israeli Arab children's song festival, and went on to graduate from the Institute for Stage Art in Tel Aviv in 1990. cit req


study track

Makhouli. Education and culture According to historian Atallah Mansour, Kafr Yasif is the "most academic Arab town in Israel." Mansour, 2004, p. 256. The Rabeah Murkus Dance Studio, Israel's first Arab dance studio, is located in Kafr Yasif. Rabeah Murkus, daughter of former Kafr Yasif mayor Nimr Murkus, also opened a dance study track for Arab high school students authorized by the Israeli Ministry of Education. The track serves 10th-12th graders


small building

remained in Kuwaykat, were soon expelled to Kafr Yasif. Though it is accepted by scholars that his tomb is in ''Kafr Yasif'', his burial place is traditionally said to be near the Talmudic sage Rabbi Akiva in Tiberias, northern Israel. Luzzato's original synagogue in Akko was razed by the city's Bedouin ruler Daher el-Omar in 1758, who built a mosque on top of it. In its place, the Jews of Akko received a small building north of the mosque which still functions as a synagogue and bears the name of the Ramchal. In addition to the contribution of artists such as singer Amal Murkus (from Kafr Yasif) to evolving traditional Palestinian (Palestinian music) and Arabic music styles, a new generation of Arab youth in Israel has also begun asserting a Palestinian identity in new musical forms. For instance of the Palestinian hip hop group DAM (DAM (band)), from Lod, has spurred the emergence of other hip hop groups from Akka, to Bethlehem, to Ramallah, to Gaza City. Murkus was born and raised in the Arab town of Kafr Yasif in Galilee, and has devoted her career to promoting Palestinian music and culture (Palestinian people#Culture) in Israel and abroad. Murkus has been performing since she was five years old. In 1979, she won first prize in the Israeli Arab children's song festival, and went on to graduate from the Institute for Stage Art in Tel Aviv in 1990. cit req


century year

politics: Women in Israel publisher University of Michigan Press isbn * *


870

chapel, and 50 Druzes. British Mandate period In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities (British Mandate of Palestine) ''Kufr Yasif'' had a population of 870; 172 Muslims, 665 Christians and 33 Druze. Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Acre, p. 36 On 1 December 1925 Kafr Yasif became one of the few


132

: archive.org stream tabulaeordinist00stregoog#page n41 mode 1up 25 , No. 29; Cited in Röhricht, 1893, RRH, p. 190, No. 710; Cited in Pringle, 2009, p. 132 In the 13th century it was inhabited by Christians and paid tithes to the Bishop of Acre (Roman Catholic Bishop of Acre). Ellenblum, 2003, p.

of the 1759 earthquake. According to Jewish travelers, the Jews in Kafr Yasif lived well under the auspices of Daher al-Omar, the autonomous Arab ruler of the Galilee. Barnay, 1992, p. 156. In 1838 Kafr Yasif was classified as having a Greek Orthodox Christian majority with Muslim and Druze minorites. Robinson and Smith, 1841, vol 3, 2nd appendix, p.132 mode 1up 132 In 1880


title historical

politics: Women in Israel publisher University of Michigan Press isbn * In addition to the contribution of artists such as singer Amal Murkus (from Kafr Yasif) to evolving traditional Palestinian (Palestinian music) and Arabic music styles, a new generation of Arab youth in Israel has also begun asserting a Palestinian identity in new musical forms. For instance of the Palestinian hip hop group DAM (DAM (band)), from Lod, has spurred the emergence of other hip hop groups from Akka, to Bethlehem, to Ramallah, to Gaza City. Murkus was born and raised in the Arab town of Kafr Yasif in Galilee, and has devoted her career to promoting Palestinian music and culture (Palestinian people#Culture) in Israel and abroad. Murkus has been performing since she was five years old. In 1979, she won first prize in the Israeli Arab children's song festival, and went on to graduate from the Institute for Stage Art in Tel Aviv in 1990. cit req

Kafr Yasif

'''Kafr Yasif''' ( northeast of the city of Acre (Acre, Israel) and adjacent to Abu Sinan. The population of Kafr Yasif is largely Christian (Arab Christian) (57%) with a significant Muslim minority (40%), and a small Druze community.

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