Jish

What is Jish known for?


time including

The Galilee earthquake of 1837 caused widespread damage and over 200 deaths. Three weeks afterward, contemporaries reported "a large rent in the ground...about a foot wide and fifty feet long." All the Galilee villages that were badly damaged at the time, including Jish, were situated on the slopes of steep hills. The presence of old landslides has been observed on aerial photographs. The fact that the village was built on dip slopes consisting of soft bedrock


apples

: www.ynet.co.il articles 0,7340,L-3994394,00.html ''On the slopes of a hill, at an elevation of 860 meters surrounded by cherry orchards, pears and apples, built houses, especially church building looks from afar. Number of inhabitants 3,000 divided by 55% Maronite Christian, 10% Greek Catholics and the rest are Muslims.''


850

, Israel Dalton , a neighboring Jewish community. The 2,500 meter-long trail, accessible to people with disabilities, sits 850 meters above sea level and has several lookout points, including a view of Dalton Lake, where rainwater is collected and stored for agricultural use. Galilee Coexistence Trail Inaugurated, Jerusalem Post Today Jish is known for its efforts to revive


198

of the 19th century, Jish was described as a "well-built village of good masonry" with about 600 Christian and 200 Muslim inhabitants. Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p.198 mode 1up 198 British Mandate At the time of the 1922 census of Palestine, Jish had a population of 380 Christians and 341 Muslims. Barron, 1923, Tables XI, XVI ref


long quot

The Galilee earthquake of 1837 caused widespread damage and over 200 deaths. Three weeks afterward, contemporaries reported "a large rent in the ground...about a foot wide and fifty feet long." All the Galilee villages that were badly damaged at the time, including Jish, were situated on the slopes of steep hills. The presence of old landslides has been observed on aerial photographs. The fact that the village was built on dip slopes consisting of soft bedrock and soil has made it more vulnerable to landslides. Damage Caused By Landslides During the Earthquakes of 1837 and 1927 in the Galilee Region According to Andrew Thomson (Andrew Thomson (Broughton)), no houses in Jish were left standing. The church fell, killing 130 people and the old town walls collapsed. A total of 235 people died and the ground was left fissured. At the end of the 19th century, Jish was described as a "well-built village of good masonry" with about 600 Christian and 200 Muslim inhabitants. Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 198 British Mandate At the time of the 1922 census of Palestine, Jish had a population of 380 Christians and 341 Muslims. Barron, 1923, Tables XI, XVI The Christians were classified as 71% Maronite (Maronite Church) and 29% Greek Catholic (Melchite). By the 1931 census (1931 census of Palestine), Jish had 182 inhabited houses and a population of 358 Christians and 397 Muslims. Mills, 1932, p. 107 In 1945, Jish had a population of 1,090 and the village spanned 12,602 dunams, mostly Arab-owned.


quot abundance

: Historica, theologica, gnostica, Biblica et Apocrypha author Elizabeth A. Livingstone publisher Peeters Publishers year 1989 isbn 978-90-6831231-7 id ISBN 90-6831-231-6 During the classic era the town was known as ''Gischala'' - a Greek transcription of the Hebrew name ''Gush Halav'', lit. "abundance of milk", which may be a reference to the production of milk and cheese, for which the village had been famous since the early Middle Ages, ref name "Judaica590"


stance

M. Gale Initially known as a moderate, John changed his stance when Titus arrived at the gates of Gischala accompanied by 1,000 horsemen and demanded the town's surrender.


mausoleum

accessdate 15 December 2013 Archaeological finds in Jish include two historical synagogues, a unique mausoleum and burial caves from classic era. According to Roman historian Josephus, Gischala was the last city in the Galilee to fall to the Romans (Roman Empire) during the First Jewish–Roman War. Historical sources dating from the 10th-15th centuries describe Jish (''Gush Halav'') as a village

of the synagogue, believed to date from the middle of the 3rd century or early 4th century CE, reads: "Yosei son of Nahum built this. A blessing be upon him." Coins indicate that Jish had strong commercial ties with the nearby city of Tyre (Tyre, Lebanon). On Jish's western slope, a mausoleum was excavated, with stone sarcophagi similar to those seen at the large Jewish catacomb at Beit She'arim. The inner part of the mausoleum contained ten

hewn ''loculi'', burial niches known in Hebrew as ''kokhim''. In the mausoleum, archaeologists found several skeletons, oil lamps and a glass bottle dating to the fourth century CE. A network of secret caves and passageways in Jish, some of them located under private homes, is strikingly similar to hideaways in the Judean lowlands used during the Bar Kokhba revolt. ERETZ Magazine ref>


centuries

accessdate 15 December 2013 Archaeological finds in Jish include two historical synagogues, a unique mausoleum and burial caves from classic era. According to Roman historian Josephus, Gischala was the last city in the Galilee to fall to the Romans (Roman Empire) during the First Jewish–Roman War. Historical sources dating from the 10th-15th centuries describe Jish (''Gush Halav'') as a village

onepage&q&f false ''Excavations at the ancient synagogue of Gush Ḥalav,'' Eric M. Meyers, Carol L. Meyers, James F. Strange In addition to Jewish burial sites and structures dated to 3rd - 6th centuries, Jewish-Christian amulets were discovered nearby.

series BAR International Series 1646 year 2007 publisher Archaeopress place Oxford isbn 978-1-4073-0080-1 Arab, Crusader and Mamluk rule Historical sources from the 10th-15th centuries describe Gush Halav (Jish) as a large Jewish village. It is mentioned in the 10th century by Arab geographer Al-Muqaddasi. Jewish life in the 10th and 11th centuries is attested to by documents in the Cairo Geniza.


title religious

-Qqj2sFZYo&hl en&ei P_msTsrPOo7T4QS9mp3VDg&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 3&ved 0CCIQ6AEwAjgK#v onepage&q gush%20halav%20village%20byzantine%20remains&f false The missing century: Palestine in the fifth century : growth and decline, Zeev Safrai Christian artifacts from the Byzantine period have been found at the site.

Jish

'''Jish''' (

Archaeological finds in Jish include two historical synagogues, a unique mausoleum and burial caves from classic era. According to Roman historian Josephus, Gischala was the last city in the Galilee to fall to the Romans (Roman Empire) during the First Jewish–Roman War. Historical sources dating from the 10th-15th centuries describe Jish (''Gush Halav'') as a village with a strong Jewish (Jews) presence. A small Druze community lived in Jish in the 17th century. The village was re-established in the 18th century AD by farmers from Mount Lebanon.

In 1945, Jish had a population of 1,090 with an area of 12,602 dunams. It was largely depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, but was resettled by Maronite Christians, who were expelled from the razed villages Kafr Bir'im. Morris, 2004. p.508.

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