Jish

What is Jish known for?


battle quot

;ref name Morris473 Morris, 2004, p.473 after "a hard-fought battle." Morris, 2004, pp. 500–501 Benny Morris reports allegations that ten prisoners of war, identified as Moroccans fighting with the Syrian Army, and a number of villagers, including a woman and her baby, were murdered. Morris, 2004, p. 481, citing Israeli sources but noting their lack of clarity The Israeli prime minister, David Ben


strong commercial

of the synagogue, believed to date from the middle of the 3rd century or early 4th century CE, reads: "Yosei son of Nahum built this. A blessing be upon him."


stance

M. Gale Initially known as a moderate, John changed his stance when Titus arrived at the gates of Gischala accompanied by 1,000 horsemen and demanded the town's surrender.


quot abundance

: Historica, theologica, gnostica, Biblica et Apocrypha author Elizabeth A. Livingstone publisher Peeters Publishers year 1989 isbn 978-90-6831231-7 id ISBN 90-6831-231-6 During the classic era the town was known as ''Gischala'' - a Greek transcription of the Hebrew name ''Gush Halav'', lit. "abundance of milk", which may be a reference to the production of milk and cheese, for which the village had been famous since the early Middle Ages, ref name "Judaica590"


198

of the 19th century, Jish was described as a "well-built village of good masonry" with about 600 Christian and 200 Muslim inhabitants. Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p.198 mode 1up 198 British Mandate At the time of the 1922 census of Palestine, Jish had a population of 380 Christians and 341 Muslims. Barron, 1923, Tables XI, XVI ref


physical strength

. According to the Talmud, the inhabitants also engaged in the production of silk. Eleazar b. Simeon, described in the Talmud as a very large man with tremendous physical strength, was a resident of the town. He was initially buried in Gush Halav but later reinterred in Meron (Meron, Israel), next to his father, Shimon bar Yochai. el-Jish Gush Halav


490

&view article&id 490:2010-10-12-13-18-30&catid 48:2010-10-12-07-50-50&Itemid 224&lang en el-Jish Gush Halav After the fall of Gamla, Gush Halav was the last Jewish stronghold in the Galilee and Golan region during the First Jewish Revolt against Rome (66-73 CE). Gischala was the home of Yohanan of Gush Halav, known in English as John of Gischala, a wealthy olive oil merchant who became the chief commander


508

with a strong Jewish (Jews) presence. A small Druze community lived in Jish in the 17th century. The village was re-established in the 18th century AD by farmers from Mount Lebanon. In 1945, Jish had a population of 1,090 with an area of 12,602 dunams. It was largely depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, but was resettled by Maronite Christians, who were expelled from the razed villages Kafr Bir'im. Morris, 2004. p.508. ref

Elias Chacour author2 David Hazard title Blood Brothers url http: books.google.com books?id oWhULDEjbAsC accessdate 2 October 2011 year 2003 publisher Chosen Books isbn 978-0-8007-9321-0 page 57 Many of the residents of Jish forced to leave the village in 1948 fled to Lebanon and became Palestinian refugees. Christians from the nearby town of Kafr Bir'im resettled in Lebanon and Jish, Morris, 2004. p.508. ref name "


commercial ties

of the synagogue, believed to date from the middle of the 3rd century or early 4th century CE, reads: "Yosei son of Nahum built this. A blessing be upon him."


early bronze

Jish

'''Jish''' (

Archaeological finds in Jish include two historical synagogues, a unique mausoleum and burial caves from classic era. According to Roman historian Josephus, Gischala was the last city in the Galilee to fall to the Romans (Roman Empire) during the First Jewish–Roman War. Historical sources dating from the 10th-15th centuries describe Jish (''Gush Halav'') as a village with a strong Jewish (Jews) presence. A small Druze community lived in Jish in the 17th century. The village was re-established in the 18th century AD by farmers from Mount Lebanon.

In 1945, Jish had a population of 1,090 with an area of 12,602 dunams. It was largely depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, but was resettled by Maronite Christians, who were expelled from the razed villages Kafr Bir'im. Morris, 2004. p.508.

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