Jish

What is Jish known for?


local school

Maronites, now officially funded by the Israeli Ministry of Education until 8th grade in the local school. ref>


title religious

-Qqj2sFZYo&hl en&ei P_msTsrPOo7T4QS9mp3VDg&sa X&oi book_result&ct result&resnum 3&ved 0CCIQ6AEwAjgK#v onepage&q gush%20halav%20village%20byzantine%20remains&f false The missing century: Palestine in the fifth century : growth and decline, Zeev Safrai Christian artifacts from the Byzantine period have been found at the site.


battle quot

;ref name Morris473 Morris, 2004, p.473 after "a hard-fought battle." Morris, 2004, pp. 500–501 Benny Morris reports allegations that ten prisoners of war, identified as Moroccans fighting with the Syrian Army, and a number of villagers, including a woman and her baby, were murdered. Morris, 2004, p. 481, citing Israeli sources but noting their lack of clarity The Israeli prime minister, David Ben


490

&view article&id 490:2010-10-12-13-18-30&catid 48:2010-10-12-07-50-50&Itemid 224&lang en el-Jish Gush Halav After the fall of Gamla, Gush Halav was the last Jewish stronghold in the Galilee and Golan region during the First Jewish Revolt against Rome (66-73 CE). Gischala was the home of Yohanan of Gush Halav, known in English as John of Gischala, a wealthy olive oil merchant who became the chief commander


physical strength

. According to the Talmud, the inhabitants also engaged in the production of silk. Eleazar b. Simeon, described in the Talmud as a very large man with tremendous physical strength, was a resident of the town. He was initially buried in Gush Halav but later reinterred in Meron (Meron, Israel), next to his father, Shimon bar Yochai. el-Jish Gush Halav


strong commercial

of the synagogue, believed to date from the middle of the 3rd century or early 4th century CE, reads: "Yosei son of Nahum built this. A blessing be upon him."


long quot

The Galilee earthquake of 1837 caused widespread damage and over 200 deaths. Three weeks afterward, contemporaries reported "a large rent in the ground...about a foot wide and fifty feet long." All the Galilee villages that were badly damaged at the time, including Jish, were situated on the slopes of steep hills. The presence of old landslides has been observed on aerial photographs. The fact that the village was built on dip slopes consisting of soft bedrock and soil has made it more vulnerable to landslides. Damage Caused By Landslides During the Earthquakes of 1837 and 1927 in the Galilee Region According to Andrew Thomson (Andrew Thomson (Broughton)), no houses in Jish were left standing. The church fell, killing 130 people and the old town walls collapsed. A total of 235 people died and the ground was left fissured. At the end of the 19th century, Jish was described as a "well-built village of good masonry" with about 600 Christian and 200 Muslim inhabitants. Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 198 British Mandate At the time of the 1922 census of Palestine, Jish had a population of 380 Christians and 341 Muslims. Barron, 1923, Tables XI, XVI The Christians were classified as 71% Maronite (Maronite Church) and 29% Greek Catholic (Melchite). By the 1931 census (1931 census of Palestine), Jish had 182 inhabited houses and a population of 358 Christians and 397 Muslims. Mills, 1932, p. 107 In 1945, Jish had a population of 1,090 and the village spanned 12,602 dunams, mostly Arab-owned.


stance

M. Gale Initially known as a moderate, John changed his stance when Titus arrived at the gates of Gischala accompanied by 1,000 horsemen and demanded the town's surrender.


commercial ties

of the synagogue, believed to date from the middle of the 3rd century or early 4th century CE, reads: "Yosei son of Nahum built this. A blessing be upon him."


time including

The Galilee earthquake of 1837 caused widespread damage and over 200 deaths. Three weeks afterward, contemporaries reported "a large rent in the ground...about a foot wide and fifty feet long." All the Galilee villages that were badly damaged at the time, including Jish, were situated on the slopes of steep hills. The presence of old landslides has been observed on aerial photographs. The fact that the village was built on dip slopes consisting of soft bedrock

Jish

'''Jish''' (

Archaeological finds in Jish include two historical synagogues, a unique mausoleum and burial caves from classic era. According to Roman historian Josephus, Gischala was the last city in the Galilee to fall to the Romans (Roman Empire) during the First Jewish–Roman War. Historical sources dating from the 10th-15th centuries describe Jish (''Gush Halav'') as a village with a strong Jewish (Jews) presence. A small Druze community lived in Jish in the 17th century. The village was re-established in the 18th century AD by farmers from Mount Lebanon.

In 1945, Jish had a population of 1,090 with an area of 12,602 dunams. It was largely depopulated during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, but was resettled by Maronite Christians, who were expelled from the razed villages Kafr Bir'im. Morris, 2004. p.508.

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