Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies

What is Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies known for?


crime ties" and "x"="x

;+similar+intrigue+was+then+'found%22+in+operation+in+Pontianak.+It+was+announced+in+a+Malay+language+newspaper+that+the+plotters+were&hl en&sa X&ei UwwiUpnPG6mlsQS-34G4CA&ved 0CCwQ6AEwAA Davidson 2002 , p. 78. According to some sources this happened in September 1943 at Amuntai in South Kalimantan and involved establishing up an Islamic State and expelling the Japanese but the plan was defeated.

0GrWCmZoEBMC&pg PA252&dq amuntai+japanese&hl en&sa X&ei cyZDU96IPIWw2gWY3oCgCg&ved 0CEwQ6AEwBg#v onepage&q amuntai%20japanese&f false Ricklefs 2001 , p. 252. X&ei MSZDU6jCJuaA2AXP6YDQCA&ved 0CCwQ6wEwAA#v onepage&q Amuntai%20South%20Kalimantan%20drive%20Japanese

: books.google.com books?id 4WK2s2ogHEAC&pg PA204&dq A+list+of+the+condemned+conspirators+followed;+they+included+Malays,+Bugis,+Javanese,+Minangkabaus,+Bataks,+Menadonese,+Chinese,+Eurasians,+and+...+Prominent+on+the+list+were+the+native+rulers,+who+were+entirely+wiped+out+in+this+action.&hl en&sa X&ei uStDU5aKFZDlyAHYw4CoCw&ved 0CCkQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q A%20list%20of%20the%20condemned%20conspirators%20followed%3B%20they%20included%20Malays%2C%20Bugis%2C%20Javanese%2C


hamid

, Singtan, and Mempawa were all executed by the Japanese, respectively, their names were Sjarif Mohamed Alkadri (Sultan Syarif Muhammad Alkadrie), Mohamad Ibrahim Tsafidedin (Muhammad Ibrahim Shafi ud-din II), Goesti Saoenan, Tengkoe Idris, Goesti Mesir, Sjarif Saleh, Goesti Abdoel Hamid, Ade Mohamad Arif, Goesti Mohamad Kelip, Goesti Djapar, Raden Abdul Bahri Danoe Perdana, and Mohammed Ahoufiek.

, the Japanese jailed Syarif Abdul Hamid Alqadrie (Sultan Hamid II), the son of Sultan Syarif Mohamad Alkadrie (Sjarif Mohamed Alkadri). Ooi 2013, p. 176. Later in 1944 the Dayaks assassinated a Japanese named Nakatani, who was involved in the incident

+November+tentara+Djepang+menjerang+pertahanannja+...&focus searchwithinvolume&q tjot+plieng Nasution 1963 , p. 89. Hamid+dari+M«-+rudu+%28Atjeh%3B+Nopember+...&focus


battle work

"


military projects

Internment camp in Jakarta, c. 1945 Experience of the occupation varied considerably, depending upon where one lived and one's social position. Many who lived in areas considered important to the war effort experienced torture, sex slavery, arbitrary arrest and execution, and other war crimes. Many thousands of people were taken away from Indonesia as forced laborers (''romusha'') for Japanese military projects, including the Burma-Siam Railway (Death Railway), and suffered or died as a result of ill-treatment and starvation. Between four and 10 million ''romusha'' in Java were forced to work by the Japanese military. About 270,000 of these Javanese laborers (Javanese people) were sent to other Japanese-held areas in South East Asia, Only 52,000 were repatriated to Java, meaning that there was a death rate of 80%. Tens of thousands of Indonesians were to starve, work as slave labourers, or be forced from their homes. In the National Revolution that followed, tens, even hundreds, of thousands, would die in fighting against the Japanese, Allied forces, and other Indonesians, before Independence was achieved. (Category:Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies) Indonesia (Category:Japanese military occupations) Category:Indonesia in World War II Indonesia (Category:World War II occupied territories) Category:1940s in Indonesia Category:Japan–Netherlands relations Dutch East Indies (Category:Invasions by Japan) Category:Invasions of the Dutch East Indies Category:Articles containing video clips Category:1940s in the Dutch East Indies thumb upright 125px Sukarno, the leader for Indonesian Independence (Image:Soekarno.jpg) In January 1942, Japan (Imperial Japan) invaded the Netherlands East Indies (Netherlands East Indies campaign). L., Klemen, 1999–2000, ''The Netherlands East Indies 1941–42'', " Forgotten Campaign: The Dutch East Indies Campaign 1941-1942". The Dutch surrendered two months later in Java, with Indonesians initially welcoming the Japanese as liberators. Ricklefs (1991), p. 195. Vickers (2005), pp.85, 85. The subsequent Japanese occupation of Indonesia during the remainder of World War II saw the fundamental dismantling of the Dutch colonial state's (Dutch East Indies) economic, political and social structures, replacing it with a Japanese regime. In the decades before the war, the Dutch had been overwhelmingly successful in suppressing the small nationalist movement in Indonesia such that the Japanese occupation proved fundamental for Indonesian independence. Vickers (2005), page 85 However, the Indonesian Communist Party founded by Dutch socialist Henk Sneevliet in 1914, popular also with Dutch workers and sailors at the time, was in strategic alliance with Sarekat Islam (q.v.) as early as 1917 until the Proclamation of Indonesian Independence and was particularly important in the fight against Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies in the Second World War. The Japanese encouraged and backed Indonesian nationalism in which new indigenous institutions were created and nationalist leaders such as Sukarno were promoted. The internment of all Dutch citizens meant that Indonesians filled many leadership and administrative positions, although the top positions were still held by the Japanese.


live television" and "x"="x

;+similar+intrigue+was+then+'found%22+in+operation+in+Pontianak.+It+was+announced+in+a+Malay+language+newspaper+that+the+plotters+were&hl en&sa X&ei UwwiUpnPG6mlsQS-34G4CA&ved 0CCwQ6AEwAA Davidson 2002 , p. 78. According to some sources this happened in September 1943 at Amuntai in South Kalimantan and involved establishing up an Islamic State and expelling the Japanese but the plan was defeated.

0GrWCmZoEBMC&pg PA252&dq amuntai+japanese&hl en&sa X&ei cyZDU96IPIWw2gWY3oCgCg&ved 0CEwQ6AEwBg#v onepage&q amuntai%20japanese&f false Ricklefs 2001 , p. 252. X&ei MSZDU6jCJuaA2AXP6YDQCA&ved 0CCwQ6wEwAA#v onepage&q Amuntai%20South%20Kalimantan%20drive%20Japanese

: books.google.com books?id 4WK2s2ogHEAC&pg PA204&dq A+list+of+the+condemned+conspirators+followed;+they+included+Malays,+Bugis,+Javanese,+Minangkabaus,+Bataks,+Menadonese,+Chinese,+Eurasians,+and+...+Prominent+on+the+list+were+the+native+rulers,+who+were+entirely+wiped+out+in+this+action.&hl en&sa X&ei uStDU5aKFZDlyAHYw4CoCw&ved 0CCkQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q A%20list%20of%20the%20condemned%20conspirators%20followed%3B%20they%20included%20Malays%2C%20Bugis%2C%20Javanese%2C


culture related" and "x"="x

;+similar+intrigue+was+then+'found%22+in+operation+in+Pontianak.+It+was+announced+in+a+Malay+language+newspaper+that+the+plotters+were&hl en&sa X&ei UwwiUpnPG6mlsQS-34G4CA&ved 0CCwQ6AEwAA Davidson 2002 , p. 78. According to some sources this happened in September 1943 at Amuntai in South Kalimantan and involved establishing up an Islamic State and expelling the Japanese but the plan was defeated.

0GrWCmZoEBMC&pg PA252&dq amuntai+japanese&hl en&sa X&ei cyZDU96IPIWw2gWY3oCgCg&ved 0CEwQ6AEwBg#v onepage&q amuntai%20japanese&f false Ricklefs 2001 , p. 252. X&ei MSZDU6jCJuaA2AXP6YDQCA&ved 0CCwQ6wEwAA#v onepage&q Amuntai%20South%20Kalimantan%20drive%20Japanese

: books.google.com books?id 4WK2s2ogHEAC&pg PA204&dq A+list+of+the+condemned+conspirators+followed;+they+included+Malays,+Bugis,+Javanese,+Minangkabaus,+Bataks,+Menadonese,+Chinese,+Eurasians,+and+...+Prominent+on+the+list+were+the+native+rulers,+who+were+entirely+wiped+out+in+this+action.&hl en&sa X&ei uStDU5aKFZDlyAHYw4CoCw&ved 0CCkQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q A%20list%20of%20the%20condemned%20conspirators%20followed%3B%20they%20included%20Malays%2C%20Bugis%2C%20Javanese%2C


treatment history" and "x"="x

;+similar+intrigue+was+then+'found%22+in+operation+in+Pontianak.+It+was+announced+in+a+Malay+language+newspaper+that+the+plotters+were&hl en&sa X&ei UwwiUpnPG6mlsQS-34G4CA&ved 0CCwQ6AEwAA Davidson 2002 , p. 78. According to some sources this happened in September 1943 at Amuntai in South Kalimantan and involved establishing up an Islamic State and expelling the Japanese but the plan was defeated.

0GrWCmZoEBMC&pg PA252&dq amuntai+japanese&hl en&sa X&ei cyZDU96IPIWw2gWY3oCgCg&ved 0CEwQ6AEwBg#v onepage&q amuntai%20japanese&f false Ricklefs 2001 , p. 252. X&ei MSZDU6jCJuaA2AXP6YDQCA&ved 0CCwQ6wEwAA#v onepage&q Amuntai%20South%20Kalimantan%20drive%20Japanese

: books.google.com books?id 4WK2s2ogHEAC&pg PA204&dq A+list+of+the+condemned+conspirators+followed;+they+included+Malays,+Bugis,+Javanese,+Minangkabaus,+Bataks,+Menadonese,+Chinese,+Eurasians,+and+...+Prominent+on+the+list+were+the+native+rulers,+who+were+entirely+wiped+out+in+this+action.&hl en&sa X&ei uStDU5aKFZDlyAHYw4CoCw&ved 0CCkQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q A%20list%20of%20the%20condemned%20conspirators%20followed%3B%20they%20included%20Malays%2C%20Bugis%2C%20Javanese%2C


social position

Internment camp in Jakarta, c. 1945 Experience of the occupation varied considerably, depending upon where one lived and one's social position. Many who lived in areas considered important to the war effort experienced torture, sex slavery, arbitrary arrest and execution, and other war crimes. Many thousands of people were taken away from Indonesia as forced laborers (''romusha'') for Japanese military projects, including the Burma-Siam Railway (Death Railway), and suffered


quot spell

publisher Dutch East Indies Campaign website url http: www.dutcheastindies.webs.com borneo.html Mayumi Yamamoto, "Spell of the Rebel, Monumental Apprehensions: Japanese Discourses On Pieter Erberveld," ''Indonesia'' 77 (April 2004):124–127. (Category:Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies) Indonesia (Category:Japanese military occupations) Category:Indonesia in World War II Indonesia (Category:World War II occupied territories) Category:1940s in Indonesia Category:Japan–Netherlands relations Dutch East Indies (Category:Invasions by Japan) Category:Invasions of the Dutch East Indies Category:Articles containing video clips Category:1940s in the Dutch East Indies thumb upright 125px Sukarno, the leader for Indonesian Independence (Image:Soekarno.jpg) In January 1942, Japan (Imperial Japan) invaded the Netherlands East Indies (Netherlands East Indies campaign). L., Klemen, 1999–2000, ''The Netherlands East Indies 1941–42'', " Forgotten Campaign: The Dutch East Indies Campaign 1941-1942". The Dutch surrendered two months later in Java, with Indonesians initially welcoming the Japanese as liberators. Ricklefs (1991), p. 195. Vickers (2005), pp.85, 85. The subsequent Japanese occupation of Indonesia during the remainder of World War II saw the fundamental dismantling of the Dutch colonial state's (Dutch East Indies) economic, political and social structures, replacing it with a Japanese regime. In the decades before the war, the Dutch had been overwhelmingly successful in suppressing the small nationalist movement in Indonesia such that the Japanese occupation proved fundamental for Indonesian independence. Vickers (2005), page 85 However, the Indonesian Communist Party founded by Dutch socialist Henk Sneevliet in 1914, popular also with Dutch workers and sailors at the time, was in strategic alliance with Sarekat Islam (q.v.) as early as 1917 until the Proclamation of Indonesian Independence and was particularly important in the fight against Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies in the Second World War. The Japanese encouraged and backed Indonesian nationalism in which new indigenous institutions were created and nationalist leaders such as Sukarno were promoted. The internment of all Dutch citizens meant that Indonesians filled many leadership and administrative positions, although the top positions were still held by the Japanese.


images light" and "x"="x

;+similar+intrigue+was+then+'found%22+in+operation+in+Pontianak.+It+was+announced+in+a+Malay+language+newspaper+that+the+plotters+were&hl en&sa X&ei UwwiUpnPG6mlsQS-34G4CA&ved 0CCwQ6AEwAA Davidson 2002 , p. 78. According to some sources this happened in September 1943 at Amuntai in South Kalimantan and involved establishing up an Islamic State and expelling the Japanese but the plan was defeated.

0GrWCmZoEBMC&pg PA252&dq amuntai+japanese&hl en&sa X&ei cyZDU96IPIWw2gWY3oCgCg&ved 0CEwQ6AEwBg#v onepage&q amuntai%20japanese&f false Ricklefs 2001 , p. 252. X&ei MSZDU6jCJuaA2AXP6YDQCA&ved 0CCwQ6wEwAA#v onepage&q Amuntai%20South%20Kalimantan%20drive%20Japanese

: books.google.com books?id 4WK2s2ogHEAC&pg PA204&dq A+list+of+the+condemned+conspirators+followed;+they+included+Malays,+Bugis,+Javanese,+Minangkabaus,+Bataks,+Menadonese,+Chinese,+Eurasians,+and+...+Prominent+on+the+list+were+the+native+rulers,+who+were+entirely+wiped+out+in+this+action.&hl en&sa X&ei uStDU5aKFZDlyAHYw4CoCw&ved 0CCkQ6AEwAA#v onepage&q A%20list%20of%20the%20condemned%20conspirators%20followed%3B%20they%20included%20Malays%2C%20Bugis%2C%20Javanese%2C

Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies

The '''Japanese Empire (Empire of Japan) occupied the Dutch East Indies''', modern Indonesia, during World War II from March 1942 until after the end of the War in 1945. The period was one of the most critical in Indonesian history (History of Indonesia). Under German (Germany) occupation, the Netherlands had little ability to defend its colony against the Japanese army (Imperial Japanese Army), and less than three months after the first attacks on Borneo the Japanese navy and army overran Dutch and allied forces. Initially, most Indonesians optimistically and even joyfully welcomed the Japanese as liberators from their Dutch colonial masters. This sentiment changed as Indonesians were expected to endure more hardship for the war effort. In 1944–45, Allied troops largely by-passed Indonesia and did not fight their way into the most populous parts such as Java and Sumatra. As such, most of Indonesia was still under Japanese occupation at the time of their surrender in August 1945.

The occupation was the first serious challenge to the Dutch (Netherlands) in Indonesia—it ended the Dutch colonial rule—and, by its end, changes were so numerous and extraordinary that the subsequent watershed, the Indonesian National Revolution, was possible in a manner unfeasible just three years earlier. Unlike the Dutch, the Japanese facilitated the politicisation of Indonesians down to the village level. Particularly in Java and to a lesser extent Sumatra, the Japanese educated, trained and armed many young Indonesians and gave their nationalist leaders a political voice. Thus through both the destruction of the Dutch colonial regime and the facilitation of Indonesian nationalism, the Japanese occupation created the conditions for a claim of Indonesian independence. Within days of the Japanese surrender in the Pacific, Indonesian independence was declared. However, the Netherlands sought to reclaim the Indies and a bitter five-year diplomatic, military and social struggle ensued resulting in the Netherlands recognising Indonesian sovereignty in December 1949.

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