India

What is India known for?


activism social

prnews 061004 cgw075.html?.v 25 *Bishan Singh Ram Singh, 62, Malaysian social activist (activism) and environmentalist (environmentalism), pulmonary embolism. Singh , 67, Indian cricketer and ICC (International Cricket Council) match referee, organ failure due to dengue fever and hepatitis B. Walker , 61, American film and television composer (''Final Destination'', ''Falcon Crest''), brain aneurysm. Harold Thomson Brian Thomson , 87, British (United Kingdom) chairman of D.C. Thomson & Co. Ltd (1974–2005). Umrigar , 80, Indian cricket team (Indian cricket team) captain (1955–1958), lymphoma. is a town and a municipal council in Yavatmal district of Vidarbha region in the Indian state (States and territories of India) of Maharashtra. '''Syed Muhammad Hussaini''', commonly known as '''Hazrat Khwaja Banda Nawaz Gaisu Daraz ( Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


influential religious

, the Abolition of Privy Council Jurisdiction Act 1949 came into effect, ending the right of appeal to the Privy Council. Japanese rice is usually used instead of imported rice (in dishes from Thailand, India, Italy, etc.) or including it in as a side dish to dishes that do not usually feature it, such as steak or omelets. Contemporary Jainism is a small but influential religious minority with as many as 4.2 million followers in India, Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


sports development

of Madras campus is yet another prominent landmark of Chepauk. The Central Research laboratory is located here.It is believed that the name "Chepauk" itself might have been derived from the Urdu word "Che Bagh" meaning "Six gardens". Chepauk has pincode 600005. The main roads of Chepauk are Bells Road and Walajah Road. '''Sports Development Authority of Tamil Nadu Tennis Stadium''', commonly known as SDAT Stadium, sometimes also called '''Nungambakkam Tennis Stadium''', is located in Nungambakkam, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India, and plays host for the Chennai Open ATP (Association of Tennis Professionals) Tennis championships held in the first week of January every year. The stadium was built in the year 1995 by the Government of Tamil Nadu on the occasion of South Asian Federation Games held in Chennai that year. The stadium has been the venue for Indian Open tennis tournament annually since 1997. The stadium witnessed some dramatic scenes in 1998 when legends like Boris Becker and Patrick Rafter took part in the then named Goldflake Open. Rafter went on to win the tournament. The third round Davis Cup tie in Asia Oceania Group I between India and Australia took place at the SDAT Tennis Stadium in May 2009. Career in WHO In 1951, he joined the World Health Organization (WHO) and spent almost ten years in India as Senior WHO Officer attached to the National Tuberculosis Programme. From 1962, he was Chief of the Tuberculosis Unit at the WHO Headquarters in Geneva until 1969, when he was appointed Director, Project Systems Analysis. In 1970, he was made Assistant Director-General of WHO while retaining the direction of Project Systems Analysis. In 1973, while occupying that position, Dr Mahler was elected WHO's third Director-General. He was re-elected for two successive five-year terms in 1978 and 1983 respectively. Under Dr Mahler, in 1979, the Thirty-second World Health Assembly launched the Global Strategy for Health for All by the Year 2000. He is honorary alumni of Copenhagen University Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


opposition amp

location Chennai, India date 26 May 2003 Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


shows+film

to strike Indian coins, peculiar irregular bronzes which suggests he had his base in Arachosia and Gandhara and wanted support from the native population. Western culture has greatly influenced Indonesia in modern entertainment such as television shows, film and music, as well as political system and issues. India has notably influenced Indonesian songs and movies. A popular type of song is the Indian-rhythmical dangdut, which is often mixed with Arab and Malays (ethnic


leading producing

there." Anthology, p 283 Close to forty new compositions had emerged in Rishikesh, twenty-three of which would be recorded in very rough form at Kinfauns (Kinfauns (George Harrison)), George Harrison’s home in Esher, in May 1968. Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


series personal

and Canada and the second largest in the United States by volume. Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


popular scientific

arachnids including scorpions, and not just spiders. He was also a popular scientific (popular science) author in his native language of Bengali (Bengali language), and was the author of ''Banglar Makorsha'' (literally: "Bengal's spiders") for the layman. The capital is covered with Prakrit inscriptions in the kharoshthi script of northwestern India. Red Sanstone Pillar Capital, British Museum, accessed August 2010 The capital was made on the occasion of the funeral of "the illustrious king Muki and his horse" (Muki has been conjectured to be Maues). '''''Koilodepas''''' is a genus of plant of the family (family (biology)) Euphorbiaceae. It comprises 10 species, found from India to Malesia. Half of these species are found in Malesia. associations International Council of Christian Churches (ICCC), Council of Christian Churches of India (CCCI) area India and the United States hospitals thumb St. Habel, a Anglican Church of India convert (File:Habel.jpg) The '''Anglican Church of India''' ('''ACI''') is a union of independent Anglican churches (local church) in India. When India became independent in 1947, the Church of South India (CSI) was formed as a united church of Anglicans, Baptists, Basel Mission, Lutherans and Presbyterians. The united Church of South India accepted an order of uniformity in worship and practice which was at odds with some aspects of Anglican tradition. Traditional Anglicans in the CSI did not accept this and there was a provision for separation within a period of 30 years from the CSI. Therefore, in 1964, some Anglicans decided to withdraw from the CSI and re-established the Anglican Church of India on 24 August 1964. In Hinduism, '''Khatushyamji''' is a name and manifestation of '''Barbarika''', son of Ghatotkacha. This manifestation is especially popular in the Indian state of Rajasthan. The original Sanskrit name ''Barbarīka'' is often replaced in Rajasthan by the Hindi version, ''Barbarīk'', often written as ''Barbareek''. The People's Republic of China detonated its first device using a Teller-Ulam design June 1967 ("Test No. 6"), a mere 32 months after detonating its first fission weapon (the shortest fission-to-fusion development yet known), with a yield of 3.3 Mt. Little is known about the Chinese thermonuclear program, however. Very little is known about the French development of the Teller-Ulam design beyond the fact that they detonated a 2.6 Mt device in the "Canopus (Canopus (nuclear test))" test in August 1968. In 1998, India claimed to detonate a "hydrogen bomb" in its Operation Shakti tests ("Shakti I (Operation Shakti#Shakti I)", specifically), though seismographic readings have led many non-Indian experts to conclude that this is unlikely, or at least it was unlikely to have been a success as claimed, because of its low yield (claimed to be around 45 kt, though outside experts estimate it at around 30 kt, both extremely low for a successful thermonuclear detonation). "What Are the Real Yields of India's Test?", ''Nuclear Weapon Archive'', November 2001 However even low-yield tests can have a bearing on thermonuclear capability, as they can provide information on the behavior of ''primaries'' without the full ignition of ''secondaries''. "India's Nuclear Weapons Program: Operation Shakti, 1998, ''Nuclear Weapon Archive'', March 2001 The story of ''The Raj Quartet'' begins in 1942. World War II is at its zenith, and in South East Asia, the Allied forces have suffered great losses. Burma has fallen, and the Japanese invasion of the Indian subcontinent from the east appears imminent. The year 1942 is also marked by Indian nationalist leader Mahatma Gandhi’s call for the Quit India movement (Quit India) to the British rulers of India. ''The Raj Quartet'' is set in this tumultuous background for the British soldiers and civilians stationed in India who have a duty to manage this part of the British Empire, known as the "jewel in the crown" of the British Monarch. One recurrent theme is the moral certainty of the older generation as contrasted with the anomie of the younger For instance, in ''Day of the Scorpion'', Sarah Layton envies the "self-assurance" of her older aunt. See ''Day of the Scorpion'', Book Two Part Two ch. IV . Another is the shocking racism to which this leads For example, in ''Day of the Scorpion'', Hari Kumar describes how the British were shocked and embarrassed at the sight of an Englishwoman treating an Indian as a human being rather than as an inferior being. See ''Day of the Scorpion'' Book Two Part One Ch. I . To justify the racism and combat this danger of anomie and disintegration, the British characters let themselves be "trapped by codes and principles, which were in part to keep their own fears and doubts at bay." review of ''Raj Quartet'' in The Spectator Most of the major characters suffer difficulties, and some die, either because they try to follow codes which have become outmoded (Ahmed Kasim, Merrick, Teddie Bingham) or because they reject the codes and become outsiders (Kumar, Lady and Daphne Manners, Sarah Layton). P. Morey, ''Fictions of India: Narrative and Power'', p.153 Some critcs have compared ''The Raj Quartet'' to the epic novels of Proust and Tolstoy Steinberg, ''Twentieth Century Epic Novels'', p.125 . Though some critics have thought the ''Quartet'' to be a straightforward example of nineteenth-century style realism, others have argued that its non-linear narrative style and occasional "outburst of dreams, hallucinations and spiritual revelations" give it an added dimension Morey, ''Fictions of India'', p.158 . The lead characters in the first novel, which sets the stage for the subsequent ones, are Daphne Manners, a young English (England)woman who has recently arrived in India, and her British (United Kingdom)-educated Indian lover, Hari Kumar. Ronald Merrick, a British police officer belonging to the Indian Police Service, is another main character. '''Sohail Khan''' born 20 December 1970) is an Indian director, writer, producer and actor working in the Hindi cinema (Bollywood). He is the younger brother of actors Salman Khan and Arbaaz Khan (Arbaaz Khan (Indian actor)). He produces films under his banner Sohail Khan Productions. Early life Khan was born in Mumbai, Maharashtra to screenwriter Salim Khan and his wife Salma (maiden name Sushila Charak). His paternal grandfather came to India from Afghanistan and settled in Madhya Pradesh; his mother is originally from Jammu. Charak is a common last name in the Jammu area. Salman denies backing Raj Thackeray. Rediff.com, Salman Khan and family celebrate Ganesh Chaurthi. Newsline365.com. His stepmother is Bollywood actress, Helen (Helen (actress)), who is famous for her dance and item numbers. His older brothers are actors Salman Khan and Arbaaz Khan (Arbaaz Khan (Indian actor)). His sister, Alvira Khan, is married to Bollywood actor Atul Agnihotri, while his younger sister Arpita Khan collaborated with Sneha Ullal for his movie ''Lucky: No Time for Love'', which he produced with Sohail Khan Production. Sohail Khan Biography Biography Insha was born in Phillaur tehsil of Jalandhar District, Punjab (Punjab (British India)), India. His father hailed from Rajasthan. He received his B.A. degree from Punjab University (University of the Punjab) in 1946 and M.A. from University of Karachi in 1953. He was associated with various governmental services including Radio Pakistan, Ministry of Culture and National Book Centre of Pakistan. He also served UN for some time and this enabled him to visit a lot of places and was the reason of his subsequent travelogues. Some of the places that he visited includes Japan, Philippines, China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, India, Afghanistan, Iran, Turkey, France, UK and United States. Insha got the teachers like, Habibullah Ghazenfar Amrohvi, Dr. Ghulam Mustafa Khan and Dr. Abdul Qayyum. Insha spent much of his time in Karachi. He died of Hodgkin's Lymphoma on January 11, 1978 in London and was buried in Karachi. Biography Insha was born in Phillaur tehsil of Jalandhar District, Punjab (Punjab (British India)), India. His father hailed from Rajasthan. He received his B.A. degree from Punjab University (University of the Punjab) in 1946 and M.A. from University of Karachi in 1953. He was associated with various governmental services including Radio Pakistan, Ministry of Culture and National Book Centre of Pakistan. He also served UN for some time and this enabled him to visit a lot of places and was the reason of his subsequent travelogues. Some of the places that he visited includes Japan, Philippines, China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, India, Afghanistan, Iran, Turkey, France, UK and United States. Insha got the teachers like, Habibullah Ghazenfar Amrohvi, Dr. Ghulam Mustafa Khan and Dr. Abdul Qayyum. Insha spent much of his time in Karachi. He died of Hodgkin's Lymphoma on January 11, 1978 in London and was buried in Karachi. '''Purulia''' ( Commons:Category:India Wikipedia:India Dmoz:Regional Asia India


images online

, producing many miniatures and sketches. He was elected a member of the Royal Academy in 1791. In 1792 he was appointed ''Portrait Painter in Crayons to the King''. Most of his many portraits of the Royal Family are still in the Royal Collection. 3 images online thumb 100px The 1246 letter of Güyük to Pope Innocent IV (Image:LetterGuyugToInnocence.jpg). Guyuk's enthronement on 24 August 1246, near


production representing

flax_profile.cfm title Flax Profile publisher Agricultural Marketing Resource Center accessdate 2010-11-07 date 2009-09 author Laux, Marsha In 2009, India led the world in banana production, representing approximately 28% of the worldwide crop, mostly for domestic consumption. The six leading exporting countries (Table, right) together accounted for about two-thirds of exports, each contributing more than 6 million tons, according to Food

India

'''India''' ( China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the north-east; and Burma and Bangladesh to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives; in addition, India's Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia.

Home to the ancient Indus Valley Civilisation and a region of historic trade routes and vast empires, the Indian subcontinent was identified with its commercial and cultural wealth for much of its long history. Four religions—Hinduism (Hinduism in India), Buddhism (History of Buddhism in India), Jainism (Jainism in India), and Sikhism (Sikhism in India)—originated here, whereas Judaism, Zoroastrianism (Parsi), Christianity (Christianity in India), and Islam (Islam in India) arrived in the 1st millennium CE (Common Era) and also helped shape the region's diverse culture (Culture of India). Gradually annexed by and brought under the administration of the British East India Company (Company rule in India) from the early 18th century and administered directly by the United Kingdom (British Raj) after Indian Rebellion of 1857, India became an independent nation in 1947 after a struggle for independence (Indian independence movement) that was marked by non-violent resistance led by Mahatma Gandhi (Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi).

The Indian economy (Economy of India) is the world's tenth-largest by nominal GDP (List of countries by GDP (nominal)) and third-largest by purchasing power parity (List of countries by GDP (PPP)) (PPP). Following market-based economic reforms (Economic liberalisation in India) in 1991, India became one of the fastest-growing major economies (List of countries by real GDP growth rate (latest year)); it is considered a newly industrialised country. However, it continues to face the challenges of poverty (poverty in India), corruption (Corruption in India), malnutrition (Malnutrition in India), inadequate public healthcare (Healthcare in India), and terrorism (Terrorism in India). A nuclear weapons state and a regional power (Power (international relations)#Power as status), it has the third-largest standing army (List of countries by number of troops) in the world and ranks ninth in military expenditure (List of countries by military expenditures) among nations. India is a federal (Federalism) constitutional republic governed under a parliamentary system consisting of 29 states and 7 union territories (States and territories of India). India is a pluralistic (Pluralism (political philosophy)), multilingual (Languages of India), and a multi-ethnic society. It is also home to a diversity of wildlife (Wildlife of India) in a variety of protected habitats (Protected areas of India).

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