Hill City, South Dakota

What is Hill City, South Dakota known for?


quot classic

'' ** 89.3 KBHE (South Dakota Public Broadcasting) SDPB (South Dakota Public Broadcasting) NPR (National Public Radio) (Public (Public radio) Classical (European classical music) Jazz) ** 92.3 KQRQ-FM "Q 92.3" (Classic hits) ** 93.1 99.5 KRCS "Hot 93.1" (Top 40 (Top 40 (radio format)) CHR (Contemporary hit radio)) ** 93.9 KKMK "Magic 93.9" (Adult contemporary) ** 95.1 KSQY "K-Sky" (Mainstream Rock) ** 97.9 105.7

KTPT "The Point" (Christian rock) ** 98.7 KOUT "Kat Country" (Country (Country music)) ** 100.3 KFXS "The Fox" (Classic rock) ** 103.9 K280AJ (Adult contemporary) ** 104.1 KIQK "Kick 104" (Country (Country music)) ** 105.1 KAWK "The Hawk" (Adult contemporary) ** 106.3 KZLK "Max FM" (Adult hits) *''AM Radio'' ** 810 KBHB Sturgis ** 920 KKLS (KKLS (AM)) Rapid City ** 980 KDSJ


title art

and performing arts and creative writing in Hill City and the Black Hills. Geology and paleontology The Geology Gallery contains a wall that shows a 2.5 billion year rock record of the Black Hills area. The Museum of Geology at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology provides artifacts and information for patrons to better understand the timeline. Along with the geology section is the paleontology section with fossils, much of which is on loan from the Black Hills Institute of Geological Resarch (Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, Inc.) in Hill City, South Dakota. A model of an on-site dig with a tent provides patrons with a sense of field work, sometimes with a retired paleontologist working in it who can answer questions. A model of a T-Rex (Tyrannosaurus) and a Stegosaurus accompanied by a roaring sound track are also included in the exhibit.


work black

in the 1940s, Custer State Park, and the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, the Black Hills became known as a tourist destination which Hill City benefited from. In recent years the city has diversified to become a center for the arts in the area featuring several art studios and festivals.

is the oldest city still in existence in Pennington County. A post office was constructed and opened on November 26, 1877. http: www.sdhistory.org arc sdtowns.htm Retrieved on May 26, 2007 The city almost became

accessdate 2007-12-14


year rock

Historical Society date year month Geology and paleontology The Geology Gallery contains a wall that shows a 2.5 billion year rock record of the Black Hills area. The Museum of Geology at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology provides artifacts and information for patrons to better understand the timeline. Along with the geology section is the paleontology section with fossils, much of which is on loan from the Black Hills Institute of Geological Resarch (Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, Inc.) in Hill City, South Dakota. A model of an on-site dig with a tent provides patrons with a sense of field work, sometimes with a retired paleontologist working in it who can answer questions. A model of a T-Rex (Tyrannosaurus) and a Stegosaurus accompanied by a roaring sound track are also included in the exhibit.


crime news

- relocation, real estate, travel, jobs, hospitals, schools, crime, news, sex offenders The Pennington Country Sheriff's Department has allocated three deputies to serve the Hill City area. Economy Employment in Hill City is based on the timber, tourism, and telecommunications industries


school year

. The previous high school was razed in 2003. Hill City District 51-2 schools are predominantly funded through property tax on those living in the school district. The district also has adopted an open enrollment policy that makes it easier to transfer between local school districts. Enrollment as of the 2010-2011 school year was 506, Education in South Dakota District State Wide

Profiles while the majority live outside the city limits. The school also serves the town of Keystone, South Dakota, and the unincorporated towns of Rochford (Rochford, South Dakota), and Silver City (Silver City, South Dakota). The school system is administered by a board of education which as of the 2010-2011 school year, was made up of President Owen Wiederhold and members Cydnee Gruzenski, Kris Knapp, Darrell Sullivan and Michelle Anderson


sports popular

Sports popular in the area include hiking, mountain climbing, snowmobiling and dogsled racing. Hill City is ninth trailhead on the George S. Mickelson Trail that runs from Deadwood, to Edgemont. This trail is often used for running, cycling, and snowmobiling in the winter. Geology and paleontology The Geology Gallery contains a wall that shows a 2.5 billion year rock record of the Black Hills area. The Museum of Geology at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology provides artifacts and information for patrons to better understand the timeline. Along with the geology section is the paleontology section with fossils, much of which is on loan from the Black Hills Institute of Geological Resarch (Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, Inc.) in Hill City, South Dakota. A model of an on-site dig with a tent provides patrons with a sense of field work, sometimes with a retired paleontologist working in it who can answer questions. A model of a T-Rex (Tyrannosaurus) and a Stegosaurus accompanied by a roaring sound track are also included in the exhibit.


974

area_metro_sq_mi area_blank1_title area_blank1_km2 area_blank1_sq_mi population_as_of 2010 (2010 United States Census) population_est 974 pop_est_as_of 2013 pop_est_footnotes

The Weather Channel accessdate February 27, 2012 Western Regional Climate Center (snowfall) Demographics


small world

-country skiing is popular. It was a tourist town in the 1950s and 1960s, because of its key location on US Highway 16 between Rapid City (Rapid City, South Dakota) and Mount Rushmore National Memorial, with a variety of tourist attractions, including a "Mellerdrammer" (Mellodrama) live theatre, a "Ghosttown" of various buildings with tourist shops and small amusements, "It's a Small World" Museum (featuring an 1880 Tiny Town model and other miniature collections


annual publication

Deadwood ** 1150 KIMM (KIMM (AM)) Rapid City ** 1340 KTOQ Rapid City ** 1380 KOTA (KOTA (AM)) Rapid City *''Print'' The ''Hill City Prevailer'' is a weekly newspaper covering local issues in Hill City and Keystone. Founded in 1970, the paper is published by Southern Hills Publishing Inc. and has a circulation of 850. http: www.sdna.com search.php?c Hill%20City Retrieved on May 26, 2007 Art of the Hills Magazine is a bi-annual publication focusing on visual and performing arts and creative writing in Hill City and the Black Hills. Geology and paleontology The Geology Gallery contains a wall that shows a 2.5 billion year rock record of the Black Hills area. The Museum of Geology at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology provides artifacts and information for patrons to better understand the timeline. Along with the geology section is the paleontology section with fossils, much of which is on loan from the Black Hills Institute of Geological Resarch (Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, Inc.) in Hill City, South Dakota. A model of an on-site dig with a tent provides patrons with a sense of field work, sometimes with a retired paleontologist working in it who can answer questions. A model of a T-Rex (Tyrannosaurus) and a Stegosaurus accompanied by a roaring sound track are also included in the exhibit.

Hill City, South Dakota

'''Hill City''' is the oldest existing city in Pennington County (Pennington County, South Dakota), South Dakota, United States. The population was 948 at the 2010 census (2010 United States Census). Hill City is located southwest of Rapid City (Rapid City, South Dakota) on State Highway 16 (South Dakota Highway 16) and on U.S. Route 385 that connects Deadwood (Deadwood, South Dakota) to Hot Springs (Hot Springs, South Dakota). Hill City is known as the "Heart of the Hills" which is derived from its close proximity to both the geographical center of the Black Hills, and the local tourist destinations.

The city has its roots in the Black Hills mining rush of the late 19th century. Tin mining was dominant in the 1880s and led to an influx of capital and people into the area. As the mining industry subsequently waned, tourism and timber became increasingly important to the area. With the establishment of Mount Rushmore in the 1940s, Custer State Park, and the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally, the Black Hills became known as a tourist destination which Hill City benefited from. In recent years the city has diversified to become a center for the arts in the area featuring several art studios and festivals.

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