Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

What is Harrisburg, Pennsylvania known for?


program television

and television Several feature films and television series (Television program) have been filmed or set in and around Harrisburg and the greater Susquehanna Valley (Susquehanna River). Museums, art collections, and sites of interest right thumb 250px Pennsylvania Holocaust Holocaust Memorial for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Memorial (File:David Ascalon, Ascalon Studios, Holocaust Memorial- Harrisburg, PA.jpg) along Harrisburgs' Riverfront Park (Harrisburg) Riverfront Park


stories+episode

His father worked as historian preserving the Historic Allaire Village (Allaire Village). Celebrity Ghost Stories, Episode: "Mickey Rooney, Brande Roderick, Eric Mabius, Kim Coles," 11-26-11, Biography Channel He has a brother, Craig. Eric Mabius, biography on TV Guide.com (TV Guide) Mabius is Roman Catholic and has Irish, Austrian and Polish


representing science

Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. His works in that building include allegorical medallions representing ''Science'', ''Art'', ''Justice'', and ''Religion'' in the Capitol Rotunda, large lunette murals underneath the Capitol dome, and a number of works in the House Chamber. Unfortunately, Abbey became ill with cancer in 1911 slowing his work. At the time, he was working on the "Reading of the Declaration of Independence Mural" which was later installed


early game

, but not always, when each network can show only one game each in a market, the two stations work out between themselves which will show an early game and which will show a late game. This only affects the primary market, and not markets in a radius, which always get a doubleheader each Sunday. thumb 300px right Downtown Harrisburg and the Susquehanna River (Image:Harrisburg, Pennsylvania State Capital Building.jpg) '''Downtown Harrisburg''', is the central core business


products large

for moving the products; large yards for laying down equipment; and facilities for loading their product on trains. Stacks from these factories constantly belched smoke. With housing and a small downtown area within walking distance, these were the sights and smells that most Steelton residents saw every day. The rail yard was another area of Harrisburg that saw rapid and thorough change during the years of industrialization. This was a wide expanse of about two dozen railroad tracks that grew from the single track of the early 1850s. By the late 19th century, this area was the width of about two city blocks and formed what amounted to a barrier along the eastern edge of the city: passable only by bridge. Three large and ornately embellished passenger depots were built by as many rail lines. Pennsylvania Railroad was the largest rail line in Harrisburg. It built huge repair facilities and two large roundhouses in the 1860s and 1870s to handle its enormous freight and passenger traffic and to maintain its colossal infrastructure. Its rails ran the length of Harrisburg, along its eastern border. It had a succession of three passenger depots, each built on the site of the predecessor, and each of high style architecture, including a train shed to protect passengers from inclement weather. At its peak in 1904, it made 100 passenger stops per day. It extended westward to Pittsburgh; across the entire state. It also went eastward to Philadelphia, serving Steelton en route. The vital anthracite coal mines in the Allegheny Mountains were reached by the Northern Central Railroad. The Lebanon Valley Railroad extended eastward to Philadelphia with spurs to New York City. Another rail line was the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad which provided service to Philadelphia and other points east. Eggert, Gerald G., Harrisburg Industrializes: The Coming of Factories to an American Community. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993. p40 Industrial decline 1920–70 The decades between 1920 and 1970 were characterized by industrial decline (deindustrialization) and population shift from the city to the suburbs. Like most other cities which faced a loss of their industrial base, Harrisburg shifted to a service-oriented base, with industries such as health care and convention centers playing a big role. Harrisburg’s greatest problem was a shrinking city population after 1950. This loss in population followed a national trend and was a delayed result of the decline of Harrisburg’s steel industry. This decline began almost imperceptibly in the late 1880s, but did not become evident until the early 20th century. After being held in place for about 5 years by WWII armament production, the population peaked shortly after the war, but then took a long-overdue dive as people fled from the city. Hastening the flight to the suburbs were the cheap and available houses being built away from the crime and deteriorating situation of the city. The reduction in city population coincided with the rise in population of the Metropolitan Statistical Area. The trend continued until the 1990s. Eggert, Gerald G., Harrisburg Industrializes: The Coming of Factories to an American Community. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993. p339 Beginning of Harrisburg's suburbs: 1880s The gradual loss of industry, especially after WWII, coupled with the proliferation of the street car and later the automobile, led to urban flight to the suburbs. Allison Hill was Harrisburg’s first suburb. It was located east of the city on a prominent bluff, accessed by bridges across a wide swath of train tracks. It was developed in the late 19th century and offered affluent Harrisburgers the opportunity to live in the suburbs only a few hundred yards from their jobs in the City. Easy access was achieved via the State Street Bridge leading east from the Capitol complex and the Market Street Bridge leading from the City’s prominent business district. In 1886 a single horse trolley line was established from the city to Allison Hill. The most desirable section of Allison Hill was Mount Pleasant, which was characterized by large Colonial Revival style houses with yards for the very wealthy and smaller but still well-built row houses lining the main street for the moderately wealthy. State Street, leading from the Capitol directly toward Allison Hill, was planned to provide a grand view of the Capitol dome for those approaching the City from Allison Hill. This trend towards outlying residential areas began slowly in the late 19th century and was largely confined to the trolley line, but the growth of automobile ownership quickened the trend and spread out the population. Early to late 20th century thumb right 170px Anti-nuclear (File:Anti-nuke rally in Harrisburg USA.jpg) protest at Harrisburg in 1979, following the Three Mile Island accident. In the early 20th century, the city of Harrisburg was in need of change. Without proper sanitation, diseases such as typhoid (Typhoid fever) began killing many citizens of Harrisburg. Seeing these necessary changes, several Harrisburg residents became involved in the City Beautiful movement. Mira Lloyd Dock spearheaded the movement with an impressive speech before the city’s Board of Trade. Other prominent citizens of the city such as J. Horace McFarland and Vance McCormick advocated urban improvements which were influenced by European urban planning design and the World's Columbian Exposition. Warren Manning was hired to help bring about these changes. Specifically, their efforts greatly enlarged the Harrisburg park system, creating Riverfront Park, Reservoir Park, the Italian Lake and Wildwood Park. In addition, schemes were undertaken for the burial of electric wires, the creation of a modern sanitary sewer system, and the beautification of an expanded Capitol complex (Pennsylvania State Capitol Complex). The Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest indoor agriculture exposition in the United States, was first held in 1917 and has been held every January since then. The present location of the Show is the Pennsylvania State Farm Show Arena, located at the corner of Maclay and Cameron (Cameron Street) streets. In June 1972, Harrisburg was hit by a major flood from the remnants of hurricane Agnes (Hurricane Agnes). On March 28, 1979, the Three Mile Island (Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station) nuclear plant, along the Susquehanna River located in Londonderry Township which is south of Harrisburg, suffered a partial meltdown. Although the meltdown was contained and radiation leakages were minimal, there were still worries that an evacuation would be necessary. Governor Dick Thornburgh, on the advice of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Joseph Hendrie, advised the evacuation "of pregnant women and pre-school age children ... within a five-mile radius of the Three Mile Island facility." Within days, 140,000 people had left the area. A Decade Later, TMI's Legacy Is Mistrust ''The Washington Post'', March 28, 1989, p. A01. Stephen R. Reed was elected mayor in 1981 and served until 2009, making him the city's longest serving mayor. In an effort to end the city's long period of economic troubles, he initiated several projects to attract new business and tourism to the city. Several museums and hotels such as Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts, the National Civil War Museum and the Hilton Harrisburg and Towers (Hilton Hotels) were built during his term, along with many office buildings and residential structures. Several semi-professional sports franchises, including the Harrisburg Senators of the Eastern League (Eastern League (U.S. baseball)), the defunct Harrisburg Heat (Harrisburg Heat (NPSL MISL)) indoor soccer club and the Harrisburg City Islanders of the USL Second Division began operations in the city during his tenure as mayor. While praised for the vast number of economic improvements, Reed has also been criticized for population loss and mounting debt. For example, during a budget crisis the city was forced to sell $8 million worth of Western and American-Indian artifacts collected by Mayor Reed for a never-realized museum celebrating the American West. Civil War When the Civil War started in 1861, McConaughy formed and served as captain of the "Adams Rifles," a company of civilian scouts, primarily composed of his law clients. They were active in monitoring the region for signs of Confederate (Confederate States Army) activity during several threatened incursions, including during the Maryland Campaign. McConaughy's scouts and spies were particularly active in late June 1863 during the early days of the Gettysburg Campaign, when they shadowed oncoming enemy cavalry and, later, the main infantry columns. McConaughy gave this vital information to the local military commander, Maj. (Major (United States)) Granville O. Haller, who in turn relayed it to Maj. Gen. (Major general (United States)) Darius N. Couch and Governor Andrew Curtin in Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania). McConaughy stayed in Gettysburg during the Confederate occupation in early July, still rendering service to the Federal soldiers. Following the battle, Col. George H. Sharpe wrote a letter to McConaughy on behalf of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, formally thanking him for the critical information on Confederate troop movements.


title single

York City , he lived in San Francisco for a time but has now returned to New York City. Aside from his professional role at Six Apart, Dash participated in two prank-like activities that gained attention on the Internet: in 2004, he was the winner of the "nigritude ultramarine" search engine optimization contest,


studies show

The Lehigh Valley is located approximately 50 miles (96 km) north of Philadelphia, the country's fifth largest city, 80 miles (129 km) east of Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), Pennsylvania's capital, and 70 miles (144 km) west of New York City, the country's largest city. The area is home to more than 820,000 people as of the 2010 U.S. Census. Recent census studies show it to be the fastest growing region in Pennsylvania, due in part to its growing popularity as a bedroom community (commuter town) for the highly-populated neighboring regions of Philadelphia, New Jersey and New York City as well as its favorable business climate and much lower cost of living in comparison to surrounding areas. Allentown: Chemical material producer Avantor moves headquarters from New Jersey to Center Valley - Morning Call Roads The Lehigh Valley has four major highways: Interstate 78, a major east-west highway, runs through the southern part of the Valley, duplexed with Pennsylvania Route 309. I-78 runs from Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) in the west to the Holland Tunnel and New York City in the east. The film premiered at the Equality Forum 2003 on May 1 at The Kimmel Center in Philadelphia. A later showing, held September 28, 2003 at the Pennsylvania State Museum in Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) as a fundraiser for Common Roads, a local gay youth support group, was protested by 10 members of the Westboro Baptist Church, a religious institution well known for their extreme anti-gay views. Controversial Group Protests at Capitol, Beale Air Force Base Because they announced their intention to protest in advance, they were overwhelmed by over 800 counter-protesters who declared the day "Unity Day". The counter-protest was organized by the Pride Festival of Central Pennsylvania led by community activist Reynaldo Lacaba. topo towns Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, Carlisle (Carlisle, Pennsylvania), Mechanicsburg (Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania), Shippensburg (Shippensburg, Pennsylvania), Chambersburg (Chambersburg, Pennsylvania), Greencastle (Greencastle, Pennsylvania) Hagerstown, Maryland traversed The valley is bound to the west and north by Ridge-and-Valley Appalachians (Bear Pond Mountains Blue Mountain (Blue Mountain (Pennsylvania))), to the east and south by South Mountain (South Mountain (Maryland and Pennsylvania)), to the northeast by the Susquehanna River at Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) and to the south by the Potomac River. The portion of the valley residing in Maryland is sometimes referred to as the Hagerstown Valley. The Cumberland Valley Railroad, Cumberland Valley School District, and the Cumberland Valley AVA are named for the region. The cities of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania Cumberland Valley Railroad, March 2002 – Harrisburg Pennsylvania to Winchester Virginia Retrieved 2011-01-28. and Hagerstown, Maryland are located in the Cumberland Valley. thumb (File:Lindley Murray.jpg) '''Lindley Murray''' (27 March 1745 – 16 February 1826), grammarian (Linguist), was born in a house near his father's mill, just north of Harper Tavern in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, 18 miles northeast of Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania). He was the eldest son of Robert Murray (Robert Murray (merchant)), the Quaker merchant, and Mary Lindley Murray, whose home was on a hill in Manhattan on what today is Park Avenue (Park Avenue (Manhattan)) and 36th Street. This was the center of an area known to this day as Murray Hill (Murray Hill, Manhattan). As Mayor Re-elected to the state house in 1976 and 1978, Reed was elected Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Commissioner in 1979 and Mayor of Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) in 1981. He has won re-election as Mayor in '''1985''', '''1989''', '''1993''', '''1997''', '''2001''' and '''2005'''. During the 2000s, he was considered "Pennsylvania's most popular and successful mayor." Civil War When the Civil War started in 1861, McConaughy formed and served as captain of the "Adams Rifles," a company of civilian scouts, primarily composed of his law clients. They were active in monitoring the region for signs of Confederate (Confederate States Army) activity during several threatened incursions, including during the Maryland Campaign. McConaughy's scouts and spies were particularly active in late June 1863 during the early days of the Gettysburg Campaign, when they shadowed oncoming enemy cavalry and, later, the main infantry columns. McConaughy gave this vital information to the local military commander, Maj. (Major (United States)) Granville O. Haller, who in turn relayed it to Maj. Gen. (Major general (United States)) Darius N. Couch and Governor Andrew Curtin in Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania). McConaughy stayed in Gettysburg during the Confederate occupation in early July, still rendering service to the Federal soldiers. Following the battle, Col. George H. Sharpe wrote a letter to McConaughy on behalf of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, formally thanking him for the critical information on Confederate troop movements.


service related

Development Corporation, 2005. Retrieved 2011-01-28. Its economy and more than 45,000 businesses are diversified with a large representation of service-related industries, especially health-care and a growing technological and biotechnology industry to accompany the dominant government field inherent to being the state's capital. National firms either headquartered in the region or with major operations include Ahold USA, Arcelor Mittal


big role

; ref Industrial decline 1920–70 The decades between 1920 and 1970 were characterized by industrial decline (deindustrialization) and population shift from the city to the suburbs. Like most other cities which faced a loss of their industrial base, Harrisburg shifted to a service-oriented base, with industries such as health care and convention centers playing a big role. Harrisburg’s greatest problem was a shrinking city population after 1950. This loss in population followed


show agricultural

, The Forum has been home to the Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra. Beginning in 2001, downtown Harrisburg saw a surge of commercial nightlife development. This has been credited with reversing the city's financial decline, and has made downtown Harrisburg a destination for events from jazz festivals to Top-40 nightclubs. Harrisburg is also the home of the annual Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest agricultural exhibition (Agricultural show) of its kind in the nation. Farmers from all over Pennsylvania come to show their animals and participate in competitions. Livestock are on display for people to interact with and view. In 2004, Harrisburg hosted CowParade, an international public art exhibit that has been featured in major cities all over the world. Fiberglass sculptures of cows are decorated by local artists, and distributed over the city centre, in public places such as train stations and parks. They often feature artwork and designs specific to local culture, as well as city life and other relevant themes. Demographics Civil War When the Civil War started in 1861, McConaughy formed and served as captain of the "Adams Rifles," a company of civilian scouts, primarily composed of his law clients. They were active in monitoring the region for signs of Confederate (Confederate States Army) activity during several threatened incursions, including during the Maryland Campaign. McConaughy's scouts and spies were particularly active in late June 1863 during the early days of the Gettysburg Campaign, when they shadowed oncoming enemy cavalry and, later, the main infantry columns. McConaughy gave this vital information to the local military commander, Maj. (Major (United States)) Granville O. Haller, who in turn relayed it to Maj. Gen. (Major general (United States)) Darius N. Couch and Governor Andrew Curtin in Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania). McConaughy stayed in Gettysburg during the Confederate occupation in early July, still rendering service to the Federal soldiers. Following the battle, Col. George H. Sharpe wrote a letter to McConaughy on behalf of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, formally thanking him for the critical information on Confederate troop movements.

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

leader_title3 State Senate (Pennsylvania Senate) leader_name3 Rob Teplitz (D (United States Democratic Party)) leader_title4 State Representative (Pennsylvania House of Representatives) leader_name4 Ron Buxton (D (United States Democratic Party)) leader_title5 U.S. Congress (Pennsylvania's 17th congressional district) leader_name5 Tim Holden (D (United States Democratic Party)) government_type Mayor-Council (Mayor-council government) established_title European settlement established_date About 1719 established_title2 Incorporated (Municipal Corporation) established_date2 1791 established_title3 Charter (Charter city) established_date3 1860 founder John Harris, Sr. named_for John Harris, Sr. area_magnitude total_type City unit_pref Imperial area_total_sq_mi 11.4 area_total_km2 26.9 area_land_sq_mi 8.1 area_land_km2 21.0 area_water_sq_mi 3.3 area_water_km2 8.6 area_urban_sq_mi 335.4 area_urban_km2 539.7 area_metro_sq_mi area_metro_km2 population_as_of 2010 population_note population_total 49528 population_density_sq_mi 6114 population_metro 528892 (97th (List of United States metropolitan areas)) population_density_metro_sq_mi population_urban 383008 population_density_urban_sq_mi population_blank1_title CSA (Combined statistical area) population_blank1 647390 (56th (Harrisburg metropolitan area)) population_demonym Harrisburger timezone EST (North American Eastern Time Zone) utc_offset -5 timezone_DST EDT (Eastern Daylight Time) utc_offset_DST -4 postal_code_type ZIP codes postal_code 17101-17113, 17120-17130, 17140, 17177 area_code 717 (Area code 717) latd 40 latm 16 lats 11 latNS N longd 76 longm 52 longs 32 longEW W coordinates_display inline,title elevation_m 98 elevation_ft 320 elevation_max_ft elevation_min_ft blank_name FIPS code (Federal Information Processing Standard) blank_info 42-32800 blank1_name GNIS (Geographic Names Information System) feature ID blank1_info 1213649

---- blank2_name Interstates (Interstate Highway System) blank2_info I-76 (Interstate 76 (east)), I-78 (Interstate 78 in Pennsylvania), I-81 (Interstate 81 in Pennsylvania), I-83 (Interstate 83), and I-283 (Interstate 283) blank3_name Waterways blank3_info Susquehanna River blank4_name Primary Airport blank4_info Harrisburg International Airport- MDT (Major International) blank5_name Secondary Airport blank5_info Capital City Airport (Capital City Airport (Pennsylvania))- CXY (Minor) blank6_name Public transit blank6_info Capital Area Transit (Capital Area Transit (Harrisburg)) website www.harrisburgpa.gov footnotes area code 717 (Area code 717)

'''Harrisburg''' (Pennsylvania German: ''Harrisbarig'') is the capital city of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and the county seat of Dauphin County (Dauphin County, Pennsylvania) and with a population of 49,673 is the ninth-largest city in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. It lies on the east bank of the Susquehanna River, east of Pittsburgh.

The Harrisburg-Carlisle (Carlisle, Pennsylvania) Metropolitan Statistical Area (Harrisburg metropolitan area), which includes Dauphin (Dauphin County, Pennsylvania), Cumberland (Cumberland County, Pennsylvania), and Perry (Perry County, Pennsylvania) counties, had a population of 509,074 in 2000 and grew to 549,850 in 2010. A July 1, 2007 estimate placed the population at 528,892, making it the fifth largest Metropolitan Statistical Area in Pennsylvania after Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Allentown (Allentown, Pennsylvania)−Bethlehem (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania)−Easton (Easton, Pennsylvania) (the Lehigh Valley), and Scranton (Scranton, Pennsylvania)−Wilkes Barre (Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania).

Harrisburg played a notable role in American history during the Westward Migration (Frontier), the American Civil War, and the Industrial Revolution. During part of the 19th century, the building of the Pennsylvania Canal (Pennsylvania Main Line of Public Works) and later the Pennsylvania Railroad allowed Harrisburg to become one of the most industrialized cities in the Northeastern United States. The U.S. Navy (United States Navy) ship USS ''Harrisburg'' (USS Harrisburg), which served from 1918 to 1919 at the end of World War I, was named in honor of the city.

In the mid-to-late 20th century, the city's economic fortunes fluctuated with its major industries consisting of government, heavy manufacturing (Heavy industry) including the production of steel, agriculture (the greater Harrisburg area is at the heart of the fertile Pennsylvania Dutch Country), and food services (nearby Hershey (Hershey, Pennsylvania) is home of the chocolate maker (The Hershey Company), located just

The Pennsylvania Farm Show, the largest free indoor agriculture exposition in the United States, was first held in Harrisburg in 1917 and has been held there every early-to-mid January since then. 75th Farm Show: A History of Pennsylvania's Annual Agricultural Exposition Dan Cupper, Accessed January 29, 2010. Harrisburg also hosts an annual outdoor sports (Eastern Sports and Outdoor Show) show, the largest of its kind in North America, as well as an auto show (Pennsylvania Auto Show), which features a large static display of new as well as classic cars and is renowned nationwide. Harrisburg is also known for the Three Mile Island accident, which occurred on March 28, 1979 near Middletown (Middletown, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania).

In 2010 ''Forbes'' rated Harrisburg as the second best place in the U.S. to raise a family.

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017