Handan

What is Handan known for?


844

-Shanghai), the Jingha Railway (Beijing-Harbin), and the Jingbao Railway (Beijing-Baotou). During the Eleventh Five-Year Plan (Eleventh Five-Year Plan (People's Republic of China)), Beijing and Hebei were collaborating on a new passenger railway. The RMB 82.6 billion network will add 844 kilometers to the system. Current railway systems for Hebei trains are also being upgraded and will soon be able to travel at speeds of between 160 and 200 kilometers per hour. China

by a mutiny by the officer Yang Bian (楊弁) at Hedong Circuit (河東, headquartered in modern Taiyuan, Shanxi) early in 844. Yang's mutiny was quickly put down, however, and the imperial forces continued their assault on Zhaoyi. In fall 844, the three eastern prefectures surrendered to He Hongjing and Wang Yuankui, and soon thereafter, Liu Zhen was killed by his own officer Guo Yi (郭誼), who then surrendered. In 257 BC, Qin started to besiege


created title

(鄴城, in modern Handan, Hebei). Ran Wei's crown prince Ran Zhi, Empress Dong (Empress Dong (Ran Min)), and key officials sought assistance from Jin. During Murong Jun's reign In 348, Murong Huang died, and was succeeded by his son Murong Jun, who was then still using the Jin-created title Prince of Yan. In 349, Later Zhao's emperor Shi Hu died, and his state soon fell into internectine wars between his sons and his adoptive grandson Shi Min. Murong Jun therefore decided to advance south. In Murong Jun's campaigns over the next few years, which saw him seize much of Later Zhao's territory and capture Shi Min (who had by then changed him name to Ran Min, to the family name that his father had before his adoption by Shi Hu) and destroy his short-lived state Ran Wei, Murong Ping served as a major general. Murong Ping led the army that sieged Ran Wei's capital Yecheng (鄴城, in modern Handan, Hebei), after Ran Min's capture, in 352, against Ran Min's wife Empress Dong (Empress Dong (Ran Min)) and son Ran Zhi, and the city fell to him, formally ending Ran Wei. He was put in charge of Yecheng's defenses. In 354, Murong Jun, who had by now completely broken from Jin and claimed imperial title, put him in charge of military operations in the Luoyang region (although Former Yan would not be able to capture Luoyang at this time) and also created him the Prince of Shangyong. Over the next few years, Murong Ping would be involved in leading armies against various former Later Zhao generals who were still trying to maintain independence and vacillating between Former Yan, Former Qin, and Jin. His campaigns were of mixed successes and failures. She was already Fu Pi's wife and duchess at least by 380, when her brother Yang Ying (楊膺) was described as one of the Di officers who commanded soldiers distributed to Fu Pi, then serving as viceroy over the six eastern provinces formerly ruled by Former Yan, as part of Fu Jiān (Emperor Xuanzhao)'s plan to distribute his Di people around the empire to serve as a stabilizing force. When the empire subsequently began collapsing in 384 following the failure to conquer Jin and defeat at the Battle of Fei River in 383, Yang Ying suggested to Fu Pi, whose headquarters of Yecheng (鄴城, in modern Handan, Hebei) was the only city in the eastern empire that had not fallen either to Jin or to the new state Later Yan, established by the rebel general Murong Chui, that he should surrender to Jin. When Fu Pi refused, Yang Ying conspired with another official, Jiang Rang (姜讓), to forcibly seize Fu Pi and surrender to Jin, but was discovered and killed. Despite this, Duchess Yang remained Fu Pi's wife. However, Murong Jun continued to be jealous of Murong Chui's talents. He briefly made Murong Chui the defender of the important city and former capital Longcheng (龍城, in modern Jinzhou, Liaoning), but after it became clear that Murong Chui was ruling the region successfully and garnered the support of the people, Murong Jun became fearful and recalled him to the new capital Yecheng (鄴城, in modern Handan, Hebei). In winter 393, Murong Chui turned his attention to Western Yan. After leading Murong Yong to believe that he would attack Western Yan's capital Zhangzi (長子, in modern Changzhi, Shanxi) through Taihang Pass (太行, in modern Jiaozuo, Henan), he instead surprised Western Yan by attacking through Tianjing Pass (天井關, in modern Handan, Henan), quickly advancing on Zhangzi and began besieging it. Murong Yong sought aid from Jin and Northern Wei, but before Jin and Northern Wei forces could arrive, Murong Chui captured Zhangzi, killing Murong Yong and annexing Western Yan territory into Later Yan. Before Later Yan's founding The first reference to Murong Lin in history was in 369, when Murong Chui, then a Former Yan prince, fled to Former Qin after he came after suspicion of the emperor Murong Wei's mother Empress Dowager Kezuhun (Empress Kezuhun (Jingzhao)) and the regent Murong Ping. Previously, Murong Chui's plan was to flee to the old capital Longcheng (龍城, in modern Jinzhou, Liaoning) and occupy it, and then seek reconciliation with Empress Dowager Kezuhun, but on the way, Murong Lin, who was then unfavored by Murong Chui, fled back to the capital Yecheng (鄴城, in modern Handan, Hebei) and revealed his father's plans, forcing his father to readjust his plan and flee to Former Qin instead. In fall 396, Tuoba Gui led his Northern Wei troops and made a surprise attack on Bing Province (并州, modern central and northern Shanxi), defeating Murong Nong and forcing him to flee back to Zhongshan. Tuoba Gui then advanced east, ready to attack Zhongshan. Accepting Murong Lin's suggestion, Murong Bao prepared to defend Zhongshan, leaving the Northern Wei forces free to roam over his territory, believing that Northern Wei would retreat once its forces are worn out. However, this had the effect that all of the cities' garrisons in modern Hebei abandoned them, except for Zhongshan and two other important cities—Yecheng (in modern Handan, Hebei) and Xindu (信都, in modern Hengshui, Hebei). After making an initial attack against Zhongshan and failing, Tuoba Gui changed his tactic to establishing his rule over the other cities while leaving Zhongshan alone. In spring 397, Xindu fell. Meanwhile, however, Tuoba Gui had received news of a rebellion near his capital Shengle and offered peace—which Murong Bao rejected, and Murong Bao attacked Northern Wei forces as Tuoba Gui prepared to retreat, but instead was defeated by Tuoba Gui at great loss. At this time, concerned about a coup attempt by Murong Lin, Murong Bao abandoned Zhongshan and fled to the old Former Yan capital Longcheng (龍城, in modern Jinzhou, Hebei). However, the remaining garrison at Zhongshan supported Murong Bao's nephew Murong Xiang (慕容詳) the Duke of Kaifeng as their leader, and Tuoba Gui was unable to take Zhongshan immediately. Realizing that he had alienated the Later Yan people by having slaughtered the captives at Canhe Slope, Tuoba Gui changed his policy and tried to be gentle with the conquered Later Yan territory, and while time would be required, the territories began to abide by his rule. As of 2009, D-series trains provide fast frequent service between main cities in China. For example: *Beijing - Shijiazhuang (2 hours travel time), Taiyuan(3 hours travel time), Handan (3-3.5 hours travel time), Zhengzhou(5 hours travel time). *Guangzhou - Shenzhen(1 hour travel time) In 354, after Murong De's older brother Murong Jun (Emperor Jingzhao) formally broke from Jin and claimed imperial title, he created Murong De the Duke of Liang. Sometime after Murong Jun died in 360 and was succeeded by his son Murong Wei, Murong De was created the Prince of Fanyang. By 368, he was the mayor of the capital Yecheng (鄴城, in modern Handan, Hebei) when four dukes of the rival Former Qin rebelled against Former Qin's emperor Fu Jiān. Murong De suggested to the regent, his uncle Murong Ping, that Former Yan activate its troops to aid one of them, Fu Sou (苻廋) the Duke of Wei and further take the chance to conquer Former Qin, but his strategy was rejected by Murong Ping. After the Battle of Guandu, Ju Hu was ordered to defend Handan when Cao Cao attacked Ji Province, which was governed by Yuan Shao's son Yuan Shang. In 415, the northern regions of Northern Wei suffered a major famine, causing Emperor Mingyuan to consider moving the capital southward to Yecheng (鄴城, in modern Handan, Hebei), but at the advice of Cui Hao and the official Zhou Dan (周澹), who believed that such a move would quickly expose the actual numerical inferiority of the Xianbei to the Han, he kept the capital at Pingcheng, but also pursuant to Cui and Zhou's suggestion, moved a number of impoverished Xianbei to the modern Hebei region. WikiPedia:Handan


military power

and the military power of Chu fell into the hands of the king and some other generals. In the winter of 208 BC, another rebel force claiming to restore the Zhao state (Zhao (state)), led by Zhao Xie, was besieged in Handan by Zhang Han, and Zhao Xie requested for reinforcements from Chu. King Huai II granted Xiang Yu the title of "Duke of Lu" (魯公), and placed him second-in-command to Song Yi (Song Yi (Qin Dynasty)) to lead an army to reinforce Zhao Xie. At the same time, the king

, but whose failure, leading to the downfall of the Western Han Dynasty, was her overdependence on her clan (the Wangs). King Huai II was effectively a puppet ruler, as the military power of Chu was actually in the hands of Xiang Liang and his men. However, after Xiang was killed in action at the Battle of Dingtao in the winter of 208 BC, the military power of Chu fell into the hands of King Huai II and some Chu generals, with the king gradually beginning to assert his authority


fast+frequent

supported Murong Bao's nephew Murong Xiang (慕容詳) the Duke of Kaifeng as their leader, and Tuoba Gui was unable to take Zhongshan immediately. Realizing that he had alienated the Later Yan people by having slaughtered the captives at Canhe Slope, Tuoba Gui changed his policy and tried to be gentle with the conquered Later Yan territory, and while time would be required, the territories began to abide by his rule. As of 2009, D-series trains provide fast frequent service between main cities


deadwood

Zan are escorted as prisoners-of-war back to Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). Along the way, the bandits from Mount Deadwood led by Bao Xu and Li Kui (Li Kui (Water Margin)) attack the convoy and free the captives. Becoming an outlaw After Guan Sheng defects to the outlaws from Liangshan Marsh (Mount Liang), Imperial Tutor Cai Jing recommends Shan Tinggui and Wei Dingguo to the emperor (Emperor Huizong of Song) to lead the imperial army

to quell the outlaws. When the outlaws receive news of the attack, Guan Sheng volunteers to lead an army with Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen to engage the enemy. At Lingzhou, Hao Siwen and Xuan Zan are lured into the enemy formation by Shan Tinggui and Wei Dingguo respectively and captured. Hao Siwen and Xuan Zan are escorted as prisoners of war back to Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). Along the way, the bandits from Mount Deadwood led by Bao Xu and Li Kui (Water

Prefecture. Joining Liangshan When the outlaws from Liangshan Marsh (Mount Liang) are attacking Lingzhou, Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen are captured by the imperial generals Shan Tinggui and Wei Dingguo. They are escorted as prisoners-of-war back to Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). At the same time, Li Kui (Li Kui (Water Margin)) meets Jiao Ting and they travel to Mount Deadwood to meet Bao Xu and succeed in persuading Bao to join Liangshan


great contributions

suspended. Zhang became fearful of what would come next. At that time, one of the chancellors was Su Ting, whose father Su Gui Zhang had been a friend of. Zhang thus wrote a poem praising five great officials, including Su Gui, and presented it to Su Ting. Su Ting was greatly touched by the poem, and submitted a petition to Emperor Xuanzong pointing out of Zhang's great contributions. Thereafter, Zhang was made the secretary general of the more important Jing Prefecture (荊州, roughly


line service

WikiPedia:Handan


great strength

. Shi Yong kills someone with a punch in a gambling session and he flees to Chai Jin's residence for refuge after that. Background Cai Fu is from Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). He has a younger brother named Cai Qing, who also works as a prison warden and executioner like him. He possesses great strength and conducts executions by beheading smoothly, and earns himself the nickname "Iron Arm". Background Song Jing was born in 663


including promoting

. It was also said that he killed people at will. As Emperor Dezong was more interested in appeasing the regional governors at the time, he acted as Yu requested, including promoting Xiang Prefecture's status into one where a commandant would be stationed, just as the capital of two other circuits ruled by warlords ruling their realms independently from the imperial government — Yun Prefecture (鄆州, in modern Tai'an, Shandong), the capital of Pinglu Circuit (平盧


literary talent

People's Republic of China align center HDG align center - Handan Airport - - Handan ZBHD HDG Handan Airport - In 354 BC, Wei state (Wei (state)) attacked the Zhao state (Zhao (state)), with Pang Juan leading the Wei army, and besieged the Zhao capital city of Handan. Zhao requested help from Qi, and the king of Qi commissioned Sun Bin and Tian Ji to lead an army to help Zhao. Sun Bin proposed the strategy of "besieging Wei to rescue Zhao" and the Qi army attacked the Wei capital city of Daliang (present-day Kaifeng), forcing the Wei army to turn back to save the city and effectively lifting the siege on Handan. The Wei army was ambushed and defeated by the Qi forces at the Battle of Guiling. When the Liangshan (Mount Liang) outlaws attack Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan) to rescue Lu Junyi and Shi Xiu, Cai Jing recommends Guan Sheng to lead the imperial army to attack the outlaws. Guan Sheng employs the tactic of "besieging Wei to rescue Zhao (Thirty-Six Stratagems#Chapter 1: Winning Stratagems (勝戰計))", by attacking the outlaws' base at Liangshan, forcing them to lift the siege on Daming Prefecture. He is flanked by his deputies Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen. Zhang Heng (Zhang Heng (Water Margin)), one of the leaders of the Liangshan navy, attempts to ambush Guan Sheng by sneaking into his camp at night but is quickly detected by the vigilant general and captured. Late ''Dali'' era In 773, Xue Song died, and Emperor Daizong agreed to let his brother Xue E succeed him in ruling Zhaoyi Circuit (昭義, headquartered in modern Anyang, Henan). However, Tian Chengsi, who ruled nearby Weibo Circuit (魏博, headquartered in modern Handan, Hebei), had other designs. In spring 775, under his encouragement, the Zhaoyi officer Pei Zhiqing (裴志清) rose against Xue E, and Tian subsequently captured Zhaoyi's capital Xiang Prefecture (相州). Xue E fled to imperial territory, while Tian continued his campaign to capture the rest of Zhaoyi territory despite Emperor Daizong's orders to stop his campaign. With Xue Song's other relatives Xue Xiong (薛雄) and Xue Jian (薛堅) still holding Wei (衛州, in modern Xinxiang, Henan) and Ming (洺州, in modern Handan) Prefectures, Tian attacked them and captured those prefectures, as well as Ci Prefecture (磁州, in modern Handan as well). (The remaining prefectures of Zhaoyi came under imperial control and were eventually merged with Zelu Circuit (澤潞, headquartered in modern Changzhi, Shanxi), governed by Li Baoyu's cousin Li Baozhen.) Background The ''Water Margin'' describes Lu Junyi as nine ''chi (Chi (unit))'' tall, with sparkling eyes and a deity-like appearance. He is a wealthy squire from Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). He is also highly skilled in martial arts, especially in the use of the staff (Gun (staff)). He is arguably one of the best fighters in the entire novel, the others being Guan Sheng, Lin Chong, Wu Song, Lu Zhishen, Shi Wengong, Fang La's generals Wang Yin, Shi Bao (Shi Bao (Water Margin)) and Deng Yuanjue, Tian Hu's generals Bian Xiang and Sun An, and Wang Qing's generals Mi Sheng and Du Po. His reputation and charisma earns him the nickname "Jade Unicorn", as well as the right to become the second-in-command of the Liangshan (Mount Liang) outlaws after the Grand Assembly even though he is one of the last few to join the Liangshan cause. '''Empress Wang Zhengjun''' (Traditional Chinese: 王政君), (71 BC – 13), official imperial title '''Empress Xiaoyuan''' (孝元皇后), later and more commonly known as '''Grand Empress Dowager Wang''', born in Yuancheng (modern Handan, Hebei), was an empress (empress#China) during the Western Han Dynasty of China, who played important roles during the reigns of five successive Han emperors—her husband, her son, her two stepgrandsons, and her stepgreat-grandnephew—and later (according to traditional historians, unwittingly) led to the usurpation of the throne by her nephew Wang Mang. She is largely viewed sympathetically by historians as an unassuming and benevolent if overly doting woman who suffered much in her long life, who tried to influence the empire as well as she could, and who was not a party to her nephew's machinations, but whose failure, leading to the downfall of the Western Han Dynasty, was her overdependence on her clan (the Wangs). King Huai II was effectively a puppet ruler, as the military power of Chu was actually in the hands of Xiang Liang and his men. However, after Xiang was killed in action at the Battle of Dingtao in the winter of 208 BC, the military power of Chu fell into the hands of King Huai II and some Chu generals, with the king gradually beginning to assert his authority. Following that, King Huai II commissioned Song Yi (Song Yi (Qin Dynasty)) and Liu Bang (Emperor Gaozu of Han) to lead two armies to attack Qin, promising that whoever managed to enter Guanzhong (heartland of Qin) first would be granted the title of "King of Guanzhong". Xiang Liang's nephew, Xiang Yu, was put as second-in-command to Song Yi's army, which was sent to attack the Qin forces led by Zhang Han (Zhang Han (Qin Dynasty)). Zhang's army was besieging Handan, the capital city of the Zhao state (Zhao (state)), and Song Yi refused to advance any further to assist the Zhao forces. Xiang took Song by surprise in a military conference and killed Song on charges of treason. Xiang sent a messenger to inform King Huai II, and the king approved of Xiang's command of the army reluctantly. In the winter of 207 BC, Liu Bang's army arrived in Guanzhong before Xiang and the last Qin ruler Ziying surrendered, marking the end of the Qin Dynasty. Becoming an outlaw Lu Junyi is arrested and imprisoned in Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan), after his housekeeper and adulterous wife betray him. The outlaws from Liangshan Marsh (Mount Liang) form an army to attack Daming Prefecture to rescue Lu. Grand Secretary Liang Shijie, the official in charge of Daming Prefecture, writes a letter to the imperial court, asking for reinforcements to deal with the outlaws, who are besieging the city. Becoming an outlaw When the outlaws from Liangshan Marsh (Mount Liang) besiege Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan) to rescue Lu Junyi, Grand Secretary Liang Shijie calls for reinforcements from the imperial court. Xuan Zan recommends Guan Sheng to the Imperial Tutor Cai Jing. Guan Sheng is appointed as commander of the imperial army with Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen serving as his deputies and leaders of the vanguard army. Becoming an outlaw After Guan Sheng defects to the outlaws from Liangshan Marsh (Mount Liang), Imperial Tutor Cai Jing recommends Wei Dingguo and Shan Tinggui to the emperor (Emperor Huizong of Song) to lead the imperial army to quell the outlaws. When the outlaws receive news of the attack, Guan Sheng volunteers to lead an army with his deputies Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen to engage the enemy. At Lingzhou, Hao Siwen and Xuan Zan are lured into the enemy formation by Shan Tinggui and Wei Dingguo respectively and captured. Hao Siwen and Xuan Zan are escorted as prisoners-of-war back to Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). Along the way, the bandits from Mount Deadwood led by Bao Xu and Li Kui (Li Kui (Water Margin)) attack the convoy and free the captives. Becoming an outlaw After Guan Sheng defects to the outlaws from Liangshan Marsh (Mount Liang), Imperial Tutor Cai Jing recommends Shan Tinggui and Wei Dingguo to the emperor (Emperor Huizong of Song) to lead the imperial army to quell the outlaws. When the outlaws receive news of the attack, Guan Sheng volunteers to lead an army with Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen to engage the enemy. At Lingzhou, Hao Siwen and Xuan Zan are lured into the enemy formation by Shan Tinggui and Wei Dingguo respectively and captured. Hao Siwen and Xuan Zan are escorted as prisoners of war back to Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). Along the way, the bandits from Mount Deadwood led by Bao Xu and Li Kui (Li Kui (Water Margin)) attack the convoy and free the captives. In another act of bravery, Shi Xiu attempts to save Lu Junyi from execution in Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). He runs into Yan Qing and learns from the latter that Lu Junyi has been arrested and sentenced to death. Shi Xiu storms the execution ground alone but he is outnumbered and is captured as well. He is only released from prison after the outlaws defeat imperial forces and capture Daming Prefecture. Joining Liangshan When the outlaws from Liangshan Marsh (Mount Liang) are attacking Lingzhou, Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen are captured by the imperial generals Shan Tinggui and Wei Dingguo. They are escorted as prisoners-of-war back to Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). At the same time, Li Kui (Li Kui (Water Margin)) meets Jiao Ting and they travel to Mount Deadwood to meet Bao Xu and succeed in persuading Bao to join Liangshan as well. At that point, the convoy escorting Xuan Zan and Hao Siwen passes by the mountain and Bao Xu, Jiao Ting and Li Kui lead the bandits to attack the soldiers and rescue the captives. They return to Liangshan together later. Background The ''Water Margin'' describes Shi Yong as a man eight ''chi (Chi (unit))'' tall with a pale yellowish complexion, sharp eyes and clean shaven face. He is from Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan) and earns a living by gambling. Shi Yong kills someone with a punch in a gambling session and he flees to Chai Jin's residence for refuge after that. Background Cai Fu is from Daming Prefecture (Daming County) (in present-day Handan). He has a younger brother named Cai Qing, who also works as a prison warden and executioner like him. He possesses great strength and conducts executions by beheading smoothly, and earns himself the nickname "Iron Arm". Background Song Jing was born in 663, during the reign of Emperor Gaozong (Emperor Gaozong of Tang). His clan was originally from Guangping (廣平, in modern Handan, Hebei), but by the time of Song Jing's birth, his family had relocated to Xing Prefecture (邢州, roughly modern Xingtai, Hebei). The clan traced its ancestor to the Northern Wei official Song Bian (宋弁), although Song Jing's grandfather Song Wuben (宋務本) and father Song Xuanfu (宋玄撫) served only as local officials. ''New Book of Tang'', vol. 75. Song Jing was said to be upright in his character from youth. He was also said to be learned and capable in writing, and passed the imperial examination s when he was young. Meanwhile, it was said that the senior chancellor Zhang Shuo (Zhang Yue (Tang Dynasty)) despised Yuwen, but also did not view him as a threat, despite warnings from his subordinate Zhang Jiuling. In 726, Yuwen, along with Li Linfu and another official who resented Zhang Shuo, Cui Yinfu (崔隱甫), submitted accusations of corruption against Zhang Shuo. Subsequently, Zhang was removed from his chancellor position, but at the intercession of the powerful eunuch Gao Lishi, avoided further punishment. Fearing that Zhang Shuo would eventually return to the chancellor position, Yuwen and Cui formed a faction with other officials, against Zhang Shuo and his faction. In 727, Emperor Xuanzong, tired of that situation, ordered Zhang Shuo to retire, Cui to return home to serve his mother, and demoted Yuwen to be the prefect of Wei Prefecture (魏州, in modern Handan, Hebei). In 728, Emperor Xuanzong gave Yuwen the additional posts as the examiner of Hebei Circuit (河北道, roughly modern Hebei, Beijing, and Tianjin) as well as deputy minister of census. Later that year, he made Yuwen the prefect of Bian Prefecture (汴州, roughly modern Kaifeng, Henan), and gave Yuwen the additional responsibility of managing the Yellow River levees. Yuwen proposed that the ancient routes of the Yellow River—when the lower Yellow River divided into nine river routes—be located, and that the routes be used for irrigation of rice fields; further, he also proposed that the routes could then be used for transportation. Emperor Xuanzong approved of the plan, which however did not have much progress despite expenses. In 696, during the middle of an attack by the Khitan (Khitan people) khan Sun Wanrong against Zhou prefectures north of the Yellow River, Wu Zetian promoted Di to be the prefect of Wei Prefecture (魏州, roughly modern Handan, Hebei). It was said that Di's predecessor Dugu Sizhuang (獨孤思莊), in fear of a Khitan attack, had ordered the people of the prefecture to all move within the prefectural capital's walls, drawing much fear and resentment from the people. When Di arrived, he, judging the Khitan forces to be still far away, ordered that the people be allowed to return to their homes and farms, gaining much gratitude from the people. After Sun's forces collapsed in 697 after a surprise attack by the Eastern Tujue khan Ashina Mochuo against his home base, Wu Zetian had Di, the chancellor Lou Shide, and Wu Yizong (武懿宗) the Prince of Henan (a grandson of her uncle Wu Shiyi (武士逸)) to tour the region north of the Yellow River to try to pacify the people. Emperor Xuanzong, meanwhile, was prepared to recall Yao Chong to serve as chancellor as well. It was said that Zhang disliked Yao, and tried to prevent Yao's promotion by having the chief imperial censor Zhao Yanzhao file an indictment against Yao, and then had Emperor Xuanzong's associate Jiang Jiao (姜皎) recommend Yao to serve as the commandant at Bing Prefecture (并州, roughly modern Taiyuan, Shanxi) -- both of which Emperor Xuanzong rebuffed, and Emperor Xuanzong recalled Yao to serve as minister of defense and chancellor ''de facto''. Yao, later in the year, accused Zhang of meeting Emperor Xuanzong's brother Li Fan secretly. Around the new year 713, Emperor Xuanzong demoted Zhang to serve as the prefect of Xiang Prefecture (相州, in modern Handan, Hebei), and as the examiner of the Hebei Circuit (河北道, roughly modern Hebei, Beijing, and Tianjin). For reasons lost to history, he was later demoted to be the prefect of Yue Prefecture (岳州, roughly modern Yueyang, Hunan), and the benefits he was to draw from his fief were suspended. Zhang became fearful of what would come next. At that time, one of the chancellors was Su Ting, whose father Su Gui Zhang had been a friend of. Zhang thus wrote a poem praising five great officials, including Su Gui, and presented it to Su Ting. Su Ting was greatly touched by the poem, and submitted a petition to Emperor Xuanzong pointing out of Zhang's great contributions. Thereafter, Zhang

Handan

'''Handan''' ( ) is a prefecture-level city located in the southwestern part of Hebei province, People's Republic of China. It borders Xingtai on the north, and the provinces of Shanxi on the west, Henan on the south and Shandong on the east. At the 2010 census, its population was 9,174,683 inhabitants whom 2,845,790 lived in the built-up (''or metro'') area made of 3 urban districts, Handan and Yangyan counties, and Shahe City in Xintai municipality, largely being conurbated now

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