Haight-Ashbury

What is Haight-Ashbury known for?


story year

house off Haight Street called The Other Cafe (currently the restaurant Crepes on Cole) became a full-time comedy club helping to launch the careers of Robin Williams, Dana Carvey, and Whoopi Goldberg. Also in the 1980s through to the early 1990s the I-Beam (I-Beam (nightclub)) nightclub


tenure including

a white police officer fatally shot a black youth accused of auto theft. Shelley declared a state of emergency in the city for six days. After the riots ended, Shelley took several public steps to improve relations between city government and the African-American community. He appointed the city and county's first African-American supervisor, Terry Francois. Shelley took an aggressive stance against several prominent anti-development mobilizations during his tenure, including movements in opposition to development at the Yerba Buena Gardens and in the Western Addition. Shelley bowed out of running for a second term in office; his stated reasons were health-related, but it was thought that prominent political forces in the city's establishment wanted a more stringently pro-development mayor in office. Contemporary folk art Many folk art traditions like quilting, ornamental picture framing, and decoy carving continue to thrive, while new forms constantly emerge. Since the 1960s the embellished bamboo pipe or chillum (Chillum (pipe)) has become an American folk art form. These pipes are hand made, meant to be used, and often sold by the artists on street corners in places like the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco and the Greenwich Village neighborhood of New York City. As designs these contemporary smoking pipes recall traditional decorated bamboo pipes from Africa and Borneo, Dunhill, Alfred: "The Pipe Book", London, A & C Black, 1924 however, the American carved bamboo design often employs a brass lighting fixture for a bowl. Since the 1970s, street artist Darrel "Pipeman" Mortimer of San Francisco has made nearly 10,000 bamboo pipes with incised, tattoo-like lines, each signed, numbered, and sold personally. Hemp is a frequent motif while Native American themes and designs reminiscent of Victor Vasarely or M. C. Escher are also common. Austin, Buck; "Darrel Mortimer", Alarm Magazine, Chicago, summer 2004 '''Buena Vista Park''' is a park in the Haight-Ashbury and Buena Vista Heights neighborhoods of San Francisco, California, United States. It is the oldest official park in San Francisco, established in 1867 as Hill Park and renamed Buena Vista in 1894. It is bounded by Haight Street to the north, and by Buena Vista Avenue West and Buena Vista Avenue East. The park is on a steep hill that peaks at 575 feet (175 m), and covers 37 acres (150,000 m²). The lowest section is the north end along Haight. thumb right Emmett Grogan (File:Emmett Grogan.jpg) '''Emmett Grogan''' (c. 1943–1978) was a founder of the Diggers (Diggers (theater)), a radical community-action group of Improv (Improvisational theatre) actors in the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco, California. The Diggers took their name from the English Diggers (1649-1650), a radical movement opposed to feudalism, the Church of England and the British Crown. imagesize 290px image_caption A southern view from Alta Plaza Park, which is in the Pacific Heights (Pacific Heights, San Francisco, California) neighborhood. Most of the valley in the central part of this image is in the Western Addition neighborhood. In the background on the right can be seen Sutro Tower, which is west of Twin Peaks (Twin Peaks (San Francisco)). The darker hill to the left and slightly more in the foreground is Buena Vista Heights, which is directly south of Haight Street (between the Haight-Fillmore and Haight-Ashbury neighborhoods). Cathedral Hill is visible to the left, just west of Van Ness Avenue and north of Hayes Valley. image_flag Location The Western Addition is sandwiched between Van Ness Avenue (Van Ness Avenue (San Francisco)), Golden Gate Park, the Upper (Haight-Ashbury) and Lower Haight neighborhoods, and Pacific Heights (Pacific Heights, San Francisco, California). '''The Panhandle''' is a park in San Francisco, California that forms a panhandle with Golden Gate Park. It is long and narrow, being three-quarters of a mile long and one block wide. Fell Street borders it to the north, Oak Street to the south, and Baker Street to the east. The Haight-Ashbury District lies to the south of it. Only two streets run through it, Stanyan Street at the western end between it and Golden Gate Park, and Masonic Avenue through the middle. Two paved walking paths run through it from Golden Gate Park to Baker Street, one allowing bicycles. There are basketball courts, N Owl 4th St. and Townsend Caltrain station (San Francisco 4th and King Street Station) Judah and La Playa Ocean Beach (Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California) Mission Bay (Mission Bay, San Francisco, California), Embarcadero (Embarcadero (San Francisco)) Financial District (Financial District, San Francisco), Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco), Lower Haight (Lower Haight, San Francisco, California), Haight-Ashbury, Cole Valley (Cole Valley, San Francisco, California), Sunset (Sunset District, San Francisco) Schedule Route map (PDF) right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton. In 1967, thousands of young people entered the Haight-Ashbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. The San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music (rock and roll), with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock's lyrical content. The CWLF attracted into its membership many Christians and new converts who were interested in its ministry objectives. Among those who were attracted were three men who later collaborated in the formation of the SCP: Brooks Alexander, David Fetcho (who named the ministry), and Bill Squires. Both Alexander and Fetcho were converts to Christianity from the counterculture. Alexander had participated in the psychedelic drug usage of the counterculture, was an initiate of Transcendental Meditation, and lived in the famous Haight-Ashbury community in San Francisco. Brooks Alexander, ''Reflections of an Ex'', revised ed.,(Berkeley: SCP, 1984) (originally published in ''Right On'', September 1973). Fetcho had been involved with the Ananda Marga Yoga Society before converting to Christianity. David Fetcho, "Last Meditation Lotus Adept," ''SCP Journal'', 6 1 (Winter 1984), pp. 31–36. While residing in the Bay Area, Roberts performed in many of the local clubs and as the opening act for the Steve Miller Band at the Straight Theater in Haight-Ashbury in September, 1967. He also opened for the Santana (Santana (band)) Band at a Bill Graham Winterland concert in 1970. Deanery Three The parishes in Deanery Three consist of those from the Western Addition, Japantown, Haight-Ashbury, Richmond District (Richmond District, San Francisco, California), and Cow Hollow neighborhood.


scale events

work The San Francisco Chronicle title Warren Hellman honored with Golden Gate Park meadow renaming date 1 December 2015 In 2001, Hellman founded the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival (formerly the "Strictly Bluegrass Festival"), a free music festival held in October. Hellman Hollow also plays host to a number of large-scale events such as the 911 Power to the Peaceful Festival held by musician and filmmaker Michael Franti with Guerrilla Management. History ''Zap'' #1 was published in San Francisco in late 1968. It featured the work of satirical (Satire) cartoonist Robert Crumb. Some 3,500 copies were printed by Beat (Beat generation) writer Charles Plymell. Zap Comix entry at the Grand Comics Database. Accessed October 27, 2009. Zap #1 was the first title put out by publisher Don Donahue under the Apex Novelties imprint. Philadelphia publisher Brian Zahn (who had published earlier works of R. Crumb in his tabloid called ''Yarrowstalks'' ''Heritage Comics and Comic Art Signature Auction #823'' By Ivy Press, Gary Dowell, Greg Holman ) had intended to publish an earlier version of the comix, but reportedly he left the country with the artwork. Shortly before ''Zap'' #3 was to be published, Crumb found photocopies of that earlier issue, drew new covers, and published it as ''Zap'' #0. Thus ''Zap'' #0 became the third in the series (even though it was drawn before #1 in 1967), and ''Zap'' #3 the fourth. Estren, Mark, ''A History of Underground Comics'', Ronin Publishing, 1993 ISBN 091417164X, 9780914171645 p.52 The first issue was sold on the streets of Haight-Ashbury out of a baby stroller pushed by Crumb's wife, Dana on the first day. In years to come, the comic's sales would be most closely linked with alternative venues such as head shops. Election In 2000, a system of electing supervisors by district rather than citywide took effect. At the urging of Supervisor Tom Ammiano, Gonzalez ran for supervisor in newly-made District 5 (San Francisco Board of Supervisors#District 5) (besides Hayes Valley, District 5 comprises the Haight-Ashbury, the Western Addition, Alamo Square, and the easternmost part of the Sunset District). History American head shops originated in the 1960s in cities with high concentrations of college-age youth, often growing out of independently owned poster or candle stores. Historically, US head shops proliferated on St. Mark's Place (St. Mark's Place (Manhattan)) in New York City's East Village (East Village, Manhattan), in West Los Angeles, and in San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood. Sources cite the Psychedelic Shop on Haight Street in San Francisco as the first head shop in the United States. N Owl 4th St. and Townsend Caltrain station (San Francisco 4th and King Street Station) Judah and La Playa Ocean Beach (Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California) Mission Bay (Mission Bay, San Francisco, California), Embarcadero (Embarcadero (San Francisco)) Financial District (Financial District, San Francisco), Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco), Lower Haight (Lower Haight, San Francisco, California), Haight-Ashbury, Cole Valley (Cole Valley, San Francisco, California), Sunset (Sunset District, San Francisco) Schedule Route map (PDF) right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton. In 1967, thousands of young people entered the Haight-Ashbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. The San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music (rock and roll), with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock's lyrical content. The CWLF attracted into its membership many Christians and new converts who were interested in its ministry objectives. Among those who were attracted were three men who later collaborated in the formation of the SCP: Brooks Alexander, David Fetcho (who named the ministry), and Bill Squires. Both Alexander and Fetcho were converts to Christianity from the counterculture. Alexander had participated in the psychedelic drug usage of the counterculture, was an initiate of Transcendental Meditation, and lived in the famous Haight-Ashbury community in San Francisco. Brooks Alexander, ''Reflections of an Ex'', revised ed.,(Berkeley: SCP, 1984) (originally published in ''Right On'', September 1973). Fetcho had been involved with the Ananda Marga Yoga Society before converting to Christianity. David Fetcho, "Last Meditation Lotus Adept," ''SCP Journal'', 6 1 (Winter 1984), pp. 31–36. While residing in the Bay Area, Roberts performed in many of the local clubs and as the opening act for the Steve Miller Band at the Straight Theater in Haight-Ashbury in September, 1967. He also opened for the Santana (Santana (band)) Band at a Bill Graham Winterland concert in 1970. Deanery Three The parishes in Deanery Three consist of those from the Western Addition, Japantown, Haight-Ashbury, Richmond District (Richmond District, San Francisco, California), and Cow Hollow neighborhood.


music single

to residents every day. During the "Summer of Love", psychedelic rock music was entering the mainstream, receiving more and more commercial radio airplay. The Scott McKenzie song "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)," written by John Phillips (John Phillips (musician)) of The Mamas & the Papas, became a hit (chart hit) single (single (music)) in 1967. The Monterey Pop Festival in June further cemented the status of psychedelic music as a part


public performance

N Owl 4th St. and Townsend Caltrain station (San Francisco 4th and King Street Station) Judah and La Playa Ocean Beach (Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California) Mission Bay (Mission Bay, San Francisco, California), Embarcadero (Embarcadero (San Francisco)) Financial District (Financial District, San Francisco), Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco), Lower Haight (Lower Haight, San Francisco, California), Haight-Ashbury, Cole Valley (Cole Valley, San Francisco, California), Sunset (Sunset District, San Francisco) Schedule Route map (PDF) right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton. In 1967, thousands of young people entered the Haight-Ashbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. The San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music (rock and roll), with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock's lyrical content. The CWLF attracted into its membership many Christians and new converts who were interested in its ministry objectives. Among those who were attracted were three men who later collaborated in the formation of the SCP: Brooks Alexander, David Fetcho (who named the ministry), and Bill Squires. Both Alexander and Fetcho were converts to Christianity from the counterculture. Alexander had participated in the psychedelic drug usage of the counterculture, was an initiate of Transcendental Meditation, and lived in the famous Haight-Ashbury community in San Francisco. Brooks Alexander, ''Reflections of an Ex'', revised ed.,(Berkeley: SCP, 1984) (originally published in ''Right On'', September 1973). Fetcho had been involved with the Ananda Marga Yoga Society before converting to Christianity. David Fetcho, "Last Meditation Lotus Adept," ''SCP Journal'', 6 1 (Winter 1984), pp. 31–36. While residing in the Bay Area, Roberts performed in many of the local clubs and as the opening act for the Steve Miller Band at the Straight Theater in Haight-Ashbury in September, 1967. He also opened for the Santana (Santana (band)) Band at a Bill Graham Winterland concert in 1970. Deanery Three The parishes in Deanery Three consist of those from the Western Addition, Japantown, Haight-Ashbury, Richmond District (Richmond District, San Francisco, California), and Cow Hollow neighborhood.


organizing community

there. Back in Los Angeles (Los Angeles, California), Folger spent long days in the ghettos doing her job as a volunteer social worker with children, waking up at dawn each day. The Diggers were a radical (Political radicalism) community-action group (Community organizing) of community activists and Improv (Improvisational theatre) actors operating from 1966–68, based in the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco. Their politics were such that they have sometimes


style home

it is important. (Even to explain why it was named "Granville Street" would be a positive step.) -- llywrch (User:Llywrch) 21:47, 27 August 2005 (UTC) *'''Delete''' unless its significance is explained. Zoe (User:Zoe) 22:07, August 27, 2005 (UTC) The Birth of a Weekly TV series The series began in earnest in the fall of 2001, filming every week from the restored Victorian style (Victorian architecture) home and kitchen of The Herb'n Inn, a bed and breakfast in the Haight-Ashbury


hit single

to residents every day. During the "Summer of Love", psychedelic rock music was entering the mainstream, receiving more and more commercial radio airplay. The Scott McKenzie song "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)," written by John Phillips (John Phillips (musician)) of The Mamas & the Papas, became a hit (chart hit) single (single (music)) in 1967. The Monterey Pop Festival in June further cemented the status of psychedelic music as a part

;White Rabbit (White Rabbit (song))" (1967) and "Somebody to Love (Somebody to Love (Jefferson Airplane song))" (1967). P. Frame, ''Rock Family Trees'' (London: Omnibus Press, 1980), ISBN 0-86001-414-2, p. 9. The Doors' first hit single "Light My Fire" (1967), running for over seven minutes, became one of the defining records of the genre, although their follow up album ''Strange Days (Strange Days (album))'' only enjoyed moderate


quot playing

; was, but theirs was essentially a "street party" form of it. They developed their "psychedelic" playing as a result of meeting Ken Kesey in Palo Alto, CA and subsequently becoming the house band for the Acid Tests he staged. Wolfe, Tom (Tom Wolfe) (1968). ''The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test'', Farrar Straus & Giroux After the Dead relocated to the Haight-Ashbury section of San Francisco, their "street party" form developed out of the many psychedelic dances, open-air park events, and closed-street Haight-Ashbury block parties at which they played. N Owl 4th St. and Townsend Caltrain station (San Francisco 4th and King Street Station) Judah and La Playa Ocean Beach (Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California) Mission Bay (Mission Bay, San Francisco, California), Embarcadero (Embarcadero (San Francisco)) Financial District (Financial District, San Francisco), Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco), Lower Haight (Lower Haight, San Francisco, California), Haight-Ashbury, Cole Valley (Cole Valley, San Francisco, California), Sunset (Sunset District, San Francisco) Schedule Route map (PDF) right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton. In 1967, thousands of young people entered the Haight-Ashbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. The San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music (rock and roll), with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock's lyrical content. The CWLF attracted into its membership many Christians and new converts who were interested in its ministry objectives. Among those who were attracted were three men who later collaborated in the formation of the SCP: Brooks Alexander, David Fetcho (who named the ministry), and Bill Squires. Both Alexander and Fetcho were converts to Christianity from the counterculture. Alexander had participated in the psychedelic drug usage of the counterculture, was an initiate of Transcendental Meditation, and lived in the famous Haight-Ashbury community in San Francisco. Brooks Alexander, ''Reflections of an Ex'', revised ed.,(Berkeley: SCP, 1984) (originally published in ''Right On'', September 1973). Fetcho had been involved with the Ananda Marga Yoga Society before converting to Christianity. David Fetcho, "Last Meditation Lotus Adept," ''SCP Journal'', 6 1 (Winter 1984), pp. 31–36. While residing in the Bay Area, Roberts performed in many of the local clubs and as the opening act for the Steve Miller Band at the Straight Theater in Haight-Ashbury in September, 1967. He also opened for the Santana (Santana (band)) Band at a Bill Graham Winterland concert in 1970. Deanery Three The parishes in Deanery Three consist of those from the Western Addition, Japantown, Haight-Ashbury, Richmond District (Richmond District, San Francisco, California), and Cow Hollow neighborhood.


manufacturing business

, a melting pot of sub-cultures, and the Bohemian center of the Southern United States. Little Five Points Creative Loafing. It was, however, his work with popular chemistry that earned him a truly iconic status. He developed his drug manufacturing business to help subsidize the Grateful Dead's beginnings. Stanley was the first private individual to manufacture mass quantities of Lysergic

Haight-Ashbury

'''Haight-Ashbury''' is a district of San Francisco, California, named for the intersection of Haight (Haight Street) and Ashbury streets. It is also called '''The Haight''' and '''The Upper Haight.''' SFStation.com The neighborhood is known for its history of hippie subculture.

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