Haight-Ashbury

What is Haight-Ashbury known for?


singles quot

. W. E. Studwell and D. F. Lonergan, ''The Classic Rock and Roll Reader: Rock Music from its Beginnings to the mid-1970s'' (London: Routledge, 1999), ISBN 0-7890-0151-9, p. 223. Key recordings included Jefferson Airplane's ''Surrealistic Pillow'', the first album to come out of San Francisco during this era, which sold well enough to bring the city's music scene to the attention of the record industry: from it they took two of the earliest psychedelic hit singles: " White

;, as numerous artists released recordings, beginning in the 1950s, as 45-rpm (phonograph record) "singles" (with another on the flip side (B-side)), and radio stations tended to play only the most popular of the wide variety of records being made. Also, bands tended to record only the best of their songs as a chance to become a hit record. The taste of the American listeners expanded from the folksinger, doo-wop and saxophone sounds of the 1950s to the Motown sound


free love

is often considered to have been a social experiment, because of alternative lifestyles that became common, both during the summer itself and during subsequent years. These lifestyles included communal living (Commune (intentional community)); the free and communal sharing of resources, often among total strangers; and free love. Roots of Communal Revival 1962-1966 Popular music entered an era of "all hits"


love quot

to residents every day. During the "Summer of Love", psychedelic rock music was entering the mainstream, receiving more and more commercial radio airplay. The Scott McKenzie song "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)," written by John Phillips (John Phillips (musician)) of The Mamas & the Papas, became a hit (chart hit) single (single (music)) in 1967. The Monterey Pop Festival in June further cemented the status of psychedelic music as a part

;White Rabbit (White Rabbit (song))" (1967) and "Somebody to Love (Somebody to Love (Jefferson Airplane song))" (1967). P. Frame, ''Rock Family Trees'' (London: Omnibus Press, 1980), ISBN 0-86001-414-2, p. 9. The Doors' first hit single "Light My Fire" (1967), running for over seven minutes, became one of the defining records of the genre, although their follow up album ''Strange Days (Strange Days (album))'' only enjoyed moderate

, which, during 1967's "Summer of Love," was emerging as the signature hippie locale. Expounding a philosophy that included some of the Scientology he had studied in prison, Upon a staff evaluation of Manson when he entered prison in July 1961 at the U.S. penitentiary in McNeil Island, Washington


public performance

N Owl 4th St. and Townsend Caltrain station (San Francisco 4th and King Street Station) Judah and La Playa Ocean Beach (Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California) Mission Bay (Mission Bay, San Francisco, California), Embarcadero (Embarcadero (San Francisco)) Financial District (Financial District, San Francisco), Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco), Lower Haight (Lower Haight, San Francisco, California), Haight-Ashbury, Cole Valley (Cole Valley, San Francisco, California), Sunset (Sunset District, San Francisco) Schedule Route map (PDF) right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton. In 1967, thousands of young people entered the Haight-Ashbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. The San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music (rock and roll), with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock's lyrical content. The CWLF attracted into its membership many Christians and new converts who were interested in its ministry objectives. Among those who were attracted were three men who later collaborated in the formation of the SCP: Brooks Alexander, David Fetcho (who named the ministry), and Bill Squires. Both Alexander and Fetcho were converts to Christianity from the counterculture. Alexander had participated in the psychedelic drug usage of the counterculture, was an initiate of Transcendental Meditation, and lived in the famous Haight-Ashbury community in San Francisco. Brooks Alexander, ''Reflections of an Ex'', revised ed.,(Berkeley: SCP, 1984) (originally published in ''Right On'', September 1973). Fetcho had been involved with the Ananda Marga Yoga Society before converting to Christianity. David Fetcho, "Last Meditation Lotus Adept," ''SCP Journal'', 6 1 (Winter 1984), pp. 31–36. While residing in the Bay Area, Roberts performed in many of the local clubs and as the opening act for the Steve Miller Band at the Straight Theater in Haight-Ashbury in September, 1967. He also opened for the Santana (Santana (band)) Band at a Bill Graham Winterland concert in 1970. Deanery Three The parishes in Deanery Three consist of those from the Western Addition, Japantown, Haight-Ashbury, Richmond District (Richmond District, San Francisco, California), and Cow Hollow neighborhood.


story year

house off Haight Street called The Other Cafe (currently the restaurant Crepes on Cole) became a full-time comedy club helping to launch the careers of Robin Williams, Dana Carvey, and Whoopi Goldberg. Also in the 1980s through to the early 1990s the I-Beam (I-Beam (nightclub)) nightclub


quot singles

;, as numerous artists released recordings, beginning in the 1950s, as 45-rpm (phonograph record) "singles" (with another on the flip side (B-side)), and radio stations tended to play only the most popular of the wide variety of records being made. Also, bands tended to record only the best of their songs as a chance to become a hit record. The taste of the American listeners expanded from the folksinger, doo-wop and saxophone sounds of the 1950s to the Motown sound, folk rock and the British Invasion. The Los Angeles and San Francisco Sound began in this period with many popular bands coming out of LA and the Haight-Ashbury district, well known for its hippie culture. The rise of the counterculture movement, particularly among the youth, created a market for rock (Rock and roll), soul (soul music), pop (pop music), reggae and blues music. Manson established himself as a guru in San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury, which, during 1967's "Summer of Love," was emerging as the signature hippie locale. Expounding a philosophy that included some of the Scientology he had studied in prison, N Owl 4th St. and Townsend Caltrain station (San Francisco 4th and King Street Station) Judah and La Playa Ocean Beach (Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California) Mission Bay (Mission Bay, San Francisco, California), Embarcadero (Embarcadero (San Francisco)) Financial District (Financial District, San Francisco), Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco), Lower Haight (Lower Haight, San Francisco, California), Haight-Ashbury, Cole Valley (Cole Valley, San Francisco, California), Sunset (Sunset District, San Francisco) Schedule Route map (PDF) right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton. In 1967, thousands of young people entered the Haight-Ashbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. The San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music (rock and roll), with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock's lyrical content. The CWLF attracted into its membership many Christians and new converts who were interested in its ministry objectives. Among those who were attracted were three men who later collaborated in the formation of the SCP: Brooks Alexander, David Fetcho (who named the ministry), and Bill Squires. Both Alexander and Fetcho were converts to Christianity from the counterculture. Alexander had participated in the psychedelic drug usage of the counterculture, was an initiate of Transcendental Meditation, and lived in the famous Haight-Ashbury community in San Francisco. Brooks Alexander, ''Reflections of an Ex'', revised ed.,(Berkeley: SCP, 1984) (originally published in ''Right On'', September 1973). Fetcho had been involved with the Ananda Marga Yoga Society before converting to Christianity. David Fetcho, "Last Meditation Lotus Adept," ''SCP Journal'', 6 1 (Winter 1984), pp. 31–36. While residing in the Bay Area, Roberts performed in many of the local clubs and as the opening act for the Steve Miller Band at the Straight Theater in Haight-Ashbury in September, 1967. He also opened for the Santana (Santana (band)) Band at a Bill Graham Winterland concert in 1970. Deanery Three The parishes in Deanery Three consist of those from the Western Addition, Japantown, Haight-Ashbury, Richmond District (Richmond District, San Francisco, California), and Cow Hollow neighborhood.


painting+detailed

and would be subject to renovations. The community took the sign down to avoid the financial obligation. Frisbee continued painting detailed oils including of missions. Reaction Roger Ebert gave the film three out of four stars and wrote, "''Slacker'' is a movie with an appeal almost impossible to describe, although the method of the director, Richard Linklater, is as clear as day. He wants to show us a certain strata of campus life at the present


music

'', and the activities in the area were reported almost daily. T. Anderson, ''The Movement and the Sixties: Protest in America from Greensboro to Wounded Knee'', (Oxford University Press, 1995), p.174 The Haight-Ashbury district was sought out by hippies to constitute a community based upon counterculture ideals, drugs, and music. This neighborhood offered a concentrated gathering spot for hippies to create a social experiment that would soon spread throughout the nation. ref>

to residents every day. During the "Summer of Love", psychedelic rock music was entering the mainstream, receiving more and more commercial radio airplay. The Scott McKenzie song "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)," written by John Phillips (John Phillips (musician)) of The Mamas & the Papas, became a hit (chart hit) single (single (music)) in 1967. The Monterey Pop Festival in June further cemented the status of psychedelic music as a part

on Haight Street became a hot spot for modern rock dance music in San Francisco, and a popular venue for live performances by a litany of the world's best known new wave (new wave music), punk (punk rock), industrial (industrial music), and indie (indie rock) bands. Attractions and characteristics right thumb Storefronts on Haight Street (File:Haight-Ashbury street, San Francisco.jpg) The area still maintains its bohemian (Bohemianism) ambiance. It is also home to a number


performance series

of 10 volumes in all. Along with Silliman, the other 9 writers are: Bob Perelman, Barrett Watten, Steve Benson (Steve Benson (poet)), Carla Harryman, Tom Mandel (Tom Mandel (poet)), Kit Robinson, Lyn Hejinian, Rae Armantrout, and Ted Pearson. This book further describes itself as follows: "It takes its name from a coffeehouse at 1607 Haight Street, where from 1976 to 1979 the authors took part in a reading and performance series. The writing project, begun


unique invention

N Owl 4th St. and Townsend Caltrain station (San Francisco 4th and King Street Station) Judah and La Playa Ocean Beach (Ocean Beach, San Francisco, California) Mission Bay (Mission Bay, San Francisco, California), Embarcadero (Embarcadero (San Francisco)) Financial District (Financial District, San Francisco), Civic Center (Civic Center, San Francisco), Lower Haight (Lower Haight, San Francisco, California), Haight-Ashbury, Cole Valley (Cole Valley, San Francisco, California), Sunset (Sunset District, San Francisco) Schedule Route map (PDF) right thumb 200px Ross Alley in San Francisco's Chinatown 1898. (Photo by Arnold Genthe (Image:Chinatownsf-large1.jpg)) It was during the 1860s to the 1880s when San Francisco began to transform into a major city, starting with massive expansion in all directions, creating new neighborhoods such as the Western Addition (Western Addition, San Francisco), the Haight-Ashbury, Eureka Valley (Eureka Valley, San Francisco), the Mission District (Mission District, San Francisco), culminating in the construction of Golden Gate Park in 1887. The City's famous Cable Cars (San Francisco cable car system) were built around this time, a unique invention devised by Andrew Smith Hallidie in order to traverse the City's steep hills while connecting the new residential developments. San Francisco grew in cultural prominence at this time as famous writers Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Ambrose Bierce, Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde spent time in the city, while local characters developed such as Emperor Norton. In 1967, thousands of young people entered the Haight-Ashbury district during what became known as the Summer of Love. The San Francisco Sound emerged as an influential force in rock music (rock and roll), with such acts as Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead achieving international prominence. These groups blurred the boundaries between folk, rock and jazz traditions and further developed rock's lyrical content. The CWLF attracted into its membership many Christians and new converts who were interested in its ministry objectives. Among those who were attracted were three men who later collaborated in the formation of the SCP: Brooks Alexander, David Fetcho (who named the ministry), and Bill Squires. Both Alexander and Fetcho were converts to Christianity from the counterculture. Alexander had participated in the psychedelic drug usage of the counterculture, was an initiate of Transcendental Meditation, and lived in the famous Haight-Ashbury community in San Francisco. Brooks Alexander, ''Reflections of an Ex'', revised ed.,(Berkeley: SCP, 1984) (originally published in ''Right On'', September 1973). Fetcho had been involved with the Ananda Marga Yoga Society before converting to Christianity. David Fetcho, "Last Meditation Lotus Adept," ''SCP Journal'', 6 1 (Winter 1984), pp. 31–36. While residing in the Bay Area, Roberts performed in many of the local clubs and as the opening act for the Steve Miller Band at the Straight Theater in Haight-Ashbury in September, 1967. He also opened for the Santana (Santana (band)) Band at a Bill Graham Winterland concert in 1970. Deanery Three The parishes in Deanery Three consist of those from the Western Addition, Japantown, Haight-Ashbury, Richmond District (Richmond District, San Francisco, California), and Cow Hollow neighborhood.

Haight-Ashbury

'''Haight-Ashbury''' is a district of San Francisco, California, named for the intersection of Haight (Haight Street) and Ashbury streets. It is also called '''The Haight''' and '''The Upper Haight.''' SFStation.com The neighborhood is known for its history of hippie subculture.

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