Greece

What is Greece known for?


made poetry

of the literary performance is under the control of the poet writer, and the performer never minimizes the participation of the audience members. It is important to remember that performance was the primary distribution method for poetics since tribal times and ancient Greece. As Gorski often states, broadcast and technology surpass books in reaching mass audiences for poetry, and just as writing poetry for print made poetry a completely different artform since the invention of the book, "


making guest

numbers rose sharply, and many new clubs were formed, merged and folded. It was in the early 1950s that the State Soccer Council was created to oversee the rapidly expanding popularity of the game in Tasmania. This period is often nostalgically referred to as the 'golden era' of Tasmanian football, and even featured visiting professionals from leagues such as Italy's Serie A, making guest appearances for clubs like Hobart Juventus (Hobart Zebras). Commons:Category:Greece Wikipedia:Greece Dmoz:Regional Europe Greece


song style

to that of the Florentine Camerata of the previous decade, which produced the first experiments in monody, the solo song style over continuo (Figured bass) bass which eventually developed into recitative and aria. Peri and Corsi brought in the poet Ottavio Rinuccini to write a text, and the result, ''Dafne'', though nowadays thought to be a long way from anything the Greeks would have recognised, is seen as the first work in a new form, opera. ** In Wales


radical agricultural

last Anderson first Frank Maloy last2 Hershey first2 Amos Shartle title Handbook for the Diplomatic History of Europe, Asia, and Africa 1870-1914 publisher Government Printing Office year 1918 location Washington D.C. After World War I, the application of radical agricultural reforms and the passing of a new constitution created a democratic framework and allowed for quick economic growth (industrial production doubled between 1923–1938, despite the effects of the Great Depression). With oil production of 7.2 million tons in 1937, Romania ranked second in Europe and seventh in the world. his1 The oil extracted from Romania was essential for the German war campaigns. http: www.adevarul.ro actualitate social VIDEO_Inregistrare_senzationala_cu_Hitler-_-Fara_petrolul_din_Romania_nu_as_fi_atacat_niciodata_URSS-ul_0_379162423.html Before World War II, it was Europe's second-largest food producer. Commons:Category:Greece Wikipedia:Greece Dmoz:Regional Europe Greece


significant stage

of the Greeks", the war marked a significant stage in increasing Roman intervention in the affairs of the eastern Mediterranean which would eventually lead to their conquest of the entire region. The '''Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2004''' was the second Eurovision Song Contest for young singers aged 8 to 15. It was held on 20 November 2004, in Håkons Hall, Lillehammer, Norway and lasted 2 hours and 15 minutes. The theme of the competition was "Bright Nordic


games playing

their year of initiation, and Hamarat eventually lost games playing with the white pieces against Edgar Prang (started in 2001) and Hans Marcus Elwert (started in 2002), though he apparently resigned these only after he became World Champion in January 2004. In 'over-the-board chess', he played in the finals of the Turkish championships three times. In Vienna, he played in the top league. But since 1963 his main interest has been correspondence chess, "''because I am a perfectionist''", he says. In 1997, he won the title of International Grandmaster of Correspondence Chess. The ship was built at the shipyard Kockums Mekaniska Verkstad (Kockums) in Malmö. She was delivered on September 19 to Rederi AB Malmoil who kept her for five years, she was then sold to Red AB Bellis and renamed to ''Orizon'', in 1968 she was sold to Liberian company Hemisphere SS and renamed to ''Orizon''. Sold in 1972 to Greece Athenian Oil Tankers Company who renamed her to ''Athenian Orizon'' and kept her until she was broken up at Gadani Beach in Pakistan in 1982. ! 1988 (1988 in aviation) Kanellos Kanellopoulos; Greece Anne Baddour, USA Per Lindstrand - Philip (Philip II of Macedon) next marched against his southern enemies. In Thessaly he defeated his enemies and by 352, he was firmly in control of this region. The Macedonian army advanced as far as the pass of Thermopylae which divides Greece in two parts, but it did not attempt to take it because it was strongly guarded by a joint force of Athenians, Spartans, and Achaeans (Achaea (ancient region)). Having secured the bordering regions of Macedon, Philip (Philip II of Macedon) assembled a large Macedonian army and marched deep into Thrace for a long conquering campaign. By 339 after defeating the Thracians in series of battles, most of Thrace was firmly in Macedonian hands save the most eastern Greek (Greece) coastal cities of Byzantium and Perinthus who successfully withstood the long and difficult sieges. But both Byzantium and Perinthus would have surely fell had it not been for the help they received from the various Greek city-states, and the Persian (Persian Empire) king himself, who now viewed the rise of Macedonia and its eastern expansion with concern. Ironically, the Greeks invited and sided with the Persians (Persian people) against the Macedonians, although Persia had been the nation hated the most by Greece for more than a century. The memory of the Persian (Persian Empire) invasion of Greece some 150 years ago was still alive, but the current politics for the Macedonians had put it aside. Having secured the bordering regions of Macedon, Philip (Philip II of Macedon) assembled a large Macedonian army and marched deep into Thrace for a long conquering campaign. By 339 after defeating the Thracians in series of battles, most of Thrace was firmly in Macedonian hands save the most eastern Greek (Greece) coastal cities of Byzantium and Perinthus who successfully withstood the long and difficult sieges. But both Byzantium and Perinthus would have surely fell had it not been for the help they received from the various Greek city-states, and the Persian (Persian Empire) king himself, who now viewed the rise of Macedonia and its eastern expansion with concern. Ironically, the Greeks invited and sided with the Persians (Persian people) against the Macedonians, although Persia had been the nation hated the most by Greece for more than a century. The memory of the Persian (Persian Empire) invasion of Greece some 150 years ago was still alive, but the current politics for the Macedonians had put it aside. Much greater would be the conquests of his son, Alexander the Great, who would add to the phalanx a powerful cavalry, led by his elite Companions (Companion Cavalry), and flexible, innovative formations and tactics. He advanced Greek (Greece) style of combat, and was able to muster large bodies of men for long periods of time for his campaigns against Persia (Persian Empire). Geographic range Found from the south of England through France and the Low Countries to northern Spain and Portugal, Germany, Norway and Sweden (as far north as 63° latitude), Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Switzerland, Austria, Italy and Sicily (but not in Corsica or Sardinia), the western Balkans and Greece, and European Russia as far north as 57° latitude. In Asia, it is found from Turkey to Azerbaijan, Georgia (country), Armenia and northern Iran. A turning point in Nikos Xylouris' career occurred with a recording in 1958. He first performed outside Greece in 1966 and won the first prize in the San Remo folk music festival. In 1967 he established the first Cretan Music Hall, ''Erotokritos'', in Heraklion. The recording of ''Anyfantou'' in 1969 was a big success. Xylouris soon started performances in Athens, which became his new permanent residence, at the ''Konaki'' folk music hall. The Arsenal's main gate, the ''Porta Magna'', was built around 1460 and was the first Classical revival structure built in Venice. It was perhaps built by Antonio Gambello from a design by Jacopo Bellini. Two lions taken from Greece situated beside it were added in 1687. One of the lions, known as the Piraeus Lion, is notable for the runic (Runic alphabet) defacements carved in it by invading Scandinavian mercenaries during the eleventh century. During World War II, the Australian I Corps (I Corps (Australia)) HQ was moved to Greece in April 1941. As the corps also controlled the New Zealand 2nd Division (along with Greek and British formations), it was officially renamed ANZAC Corps in April. The Battle of Greece was over in weeks and the corps HQ left Greece on 23–24 April, with the name ''ANZAC Corps'' no longer being used. D.M. Horner. "Blamey, Sir Thomas Albert (1884 - 1951)". ''Australian Dictionary of Biography'', Volume 13, Melbourne University Press, 1993, pp 196-201. Later operations On 4 October 1915, ''Albion'' arrived at Salonika to become a unit of the 3rd Detached Squadron, tasked with assisting the French Navy in a blockade of the coasts of Greece and Bulgaria and with reinforcing the Suez Canal Patrol. She embarked the first British Army contingent of 1,500 troops for Salonika and escorted French troopships carrying the French second contingent. The program is named after the Greek (Greece) mythological hero Jason. The Five-seven is currently in service with military and police forces in over 40 countries, such as Canada, France, Greece, India, Poland, Spain, and the United States. Tirans, Ivars (2009). "Baltic Defence Research and Technology 2009 Conference Proceedings". Military Review: Scientific Journal for Security and Defence (ISSN: 1407–1746), Nr. 3 4 (132 133), p 103. In the United States, the Five-seven is in use with numerous law enforcement agencies, including the U.S. Secret Service. Commons:Category:Greece Wikipedia:Greece Dmoz:Regional Europe Greece


taking world

business dates to at least May 1886, to a description of Liverpool by the ''Illustrated London News''. UK History Patrick Geddes also used the term "world city" later in 1915. Doel, M. & Hubbard, P., (2002), "Taking World Cities Literally: Marketing the City in a Global Space of flows", ''City'', vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 351-368. Subscription required ref>


scale training

year of her commissioned service completing her fitting out, conducting shakedown training off the eastern seaboard of the United States, and undergoing availability and type training. In the summer of 1949, she participated in her first large-scale training exercises in Guantanamo Bay (Guantanamo Bay Naval Base) and visited Kingston, Jamaica. Late in the summer, she sailed for the Mediterranean, departing Newport, Rhode Island, on 6 September 1949 and reaching Gibraltar 10 days later. She made her first deployment with the 6th Fleet in the ensuing months, visiting Malta; Bizerte, Tunisia; Golfe-Juan, France; Argostoli and Phaleron Bay, Greece; Iskenderum, Turkey; Trieste and Venice, Italy; and Gibraltar. During that 6th Fleet deployment, she engaged in exercises and maneuvers with fast carrier task forces, including the carrier ''Leyte'' (CV-32) and the heavy cruiser ''Des Moines'' (CA-134). She returned to Norfolk on 10 December. - Commons:Category:Greece Wikipedia:Greece Dmoz:Regional Europe Greece


bravery studies

Passchendaele , for which he was awarded the Military Cross (MC) and the French Croix de Guerre (Croix de guerre 1914-1918 (France)) for bravery. Studies of human genetics suggest that Georgian Y-DNA (Human Y-chromosome DNA haplogroup) typically belongs to Haplogroup J2 (haplogroup J2 (Y-DNA)), also found in Greece and Italy, as well as Haplogroup G (haplogroup G (Y-DNA)). Sajantila, Aantti "DNA Diversity in Europe" Department of Human Molecular Genetics


intricate wooden

of Spanish santo (saints), antique but intricate wooden furniture and quality local fiber. The native Ilocano is a weaver (weaver (occupation)), wood carver (wood carving) and pottery expert. The Ilocano cuisine – ranges from the exotic "abu-os" (ant eggs (Egg (food))) to vegetable broth "dinengdeng," and "pinakbet" the sticky "tinubong" to the "poqui-poqui" (eggplant salad). Ilocandia is filled with colonial churches, the legacy of Spanish Catholicism. newsinfo.inquirer.net, The rich treasures of Ilocandia ''' In the 330 pages of “The Ilocos Heritage” (the 27th book written by Visitacion de la Torre), the Ilocano legacy and the life of the Ilocano – are described as - "the browbeaten, industrious, cheerful, simple soul who has shown a remarkable strain of bravery and a bit of wanderlust." The Ilocano history reveals his struggles and victories – in battles for colonial independence from Spain and America, to Philippine leadership. The new Ilocano searched for greener pastures towards new lands local and foreign - Palawan, Mindanao, Hawaii, the United States and Greece. The Ilocano material culture and spirituality can be seen in the past - images of Spanish santo (saints), antique but intricate wooden furniture and quality local fiber. The native Ilocano is a weaver (weaver (occupation)), wood carver and pottery expert. The Ilocano cuisine ranges from the exotic "abu-os" (ant eggs (Egg (food))) to vegetable broth "dinengdeng," the sticky "tinubong" to the "poqui-poqui" (eggplant salad). Ilocos Sur, like other provinces in Ilocandia, is filled with colonial churches, a legacy of Spanish Catholicism. newsinfo.inquirer.net, The rich treasures of Ilocandia The thirteen stamps present full color images of the national flags of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Norway, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Greece, Yugoslavia, Albania, Austria, Denmark, and Korea, with the names of the respective countries written beneath. To the left of each flag appears the image of the phoenix (phoenix (mythology)), which symbolizes the renewal of life, and to its right appears a kneeling female figure with arms raised, breaking the shackles of servitude. The Overrun Countries Series - Junior Philatelists The stamps with flags of European countries were released at intervals from June to December 1943, while the Korea flag stamp was released in November 1944. ''The Postal Service Guide to U.S. Stamps'', 27th edition, 2000 (ISBN 0-06-095854-5), p. 128. right thumb ''Orations'' of Dio Chrysostom edited by Johann Jakob Reiske (File:Dio Chrysostom Orationes Johann Jacob Reiske 1784 page 43.jpg), 1784. Oration 1, ΠΕΡΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΙΑΣ (''On Kingship'') '''Dio Chrysostom''' (Δίων Χρυσόστομος ), '''Dion of Prusa''' or '''Dio Cocceianus''' (ca. 40 – ca. 120) was a Greek (Greece) orator, writer, philosopher and historian of the Roman Empire in the 1st century. Eighty of his ''Discourses'' (or ''Orations'') are extant, as well as a few Letters and a funny mock essay In Praise of Hair, as well as a few other fragments. His surname ''Chrysostom'' comes from the Greek (Greek language) ''chrysostomos'', which literally means "golden-mouthed". He should not be confused with the Roman historian Cassius Dio, nor with the 4th-century bishop John Chrysostom of Constantinople. Red or reddish-tinged hair is also found in other European populations particularly in the Nordic (Nordic countries) and Baltic countries as well as parts of the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium, France, Greece, Turkey, Portugal, Italy, Germany, Russia and South Slavic countries (South Slavs). Commons:Category:Greece Wikipedia:Greece Dmoz:Regional Europe Greece

Greece

Judaism has existed (History of the Jews in Greece) in Greece for more than 2,000 years. Sephardi Jews used to have a large presence in the city of Thessaloniki (by 1900, some 80,000, or more than half of the population, were Jews), but nowadays the Greek-Jewish community who survived German occupation and the Holocaust, during World War II, is estimated to number around 5,500 people.

Greek citizens who are Roman Catholic are estimated to be at around 50,000 with the Roman Catholic immigrant community in the country approximately 200,000. Old Calendarists (Greek Old Calendarists) account for 500,000 followers.

Hellenic Polytheistic Reconstructionism has also been reportedly practiced by thousands of Greeks.

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