Gagauzia

What is Gagauzia known for?


theories

территориальное образование Гагаузия, ''Avtonomnoye territorialnoye obrazovaniye Gagauziya''), is an autonomous region (Autonomous area) of Moldova. Its name comes from the Gagauz people. History According to some theories, the Gagauz people descend from the Seljuq (Seljuq dynasty) Turks (Turkish people) that settled in Dobruja, or from Pechenegs, Uz (Oghuz) and Cuman (Cumans) (Kipchak (Kipchaks)) people that followed the Anatolian Seljuq Sultan Kaykaus II

of ethnic Bulgarians (Bessarabian Bulgarians). According to other theories Gagauz are descendants of linguistically Turkified Kutrigur (Kutrigurs) Bulgarians. Стойков, Руси. Селища и демографски облик в Североизточна България и Южна Добруджа, Известия на Варненското археологическо дружество, т. ХV, 1964, с. 98. In the official Gagauz museum, a plaque mentions that one of the two main theories is that they descend from the Bulgars. Russian Empire In 1812, Bessarabia, previously


main success

(with Gagauz (Gagauz language)) is an official language of Gagauzia (autonomous republic within Moldova) The MSSR's drive towards independence from the USSR was marked by civil strife as conservative activists in the east (especially in Tiraspol), as well as Communist party activists in Chişinău worked to keep the MSSR within the Soviet Union. The main success of the national movement in 1988-1989 was the adoption on August 31, 1989 by the Supreme Soviet of the Moldavian SSR of the Moldavian language as official, declaration in the preambule of a Moldavian-Romanian linguistic unity, and the return of the language to the pre-Soviet Latin alphabet. In 1990, when it became clear that Moldova was eventually going to secede, a group of pro-USSR activists in Gagauzia and Transnistria proclaimed independence in order to remain within the USSR. Gagauzia was eventually peacefully incorporated into Moldova as an autonomous territory, but relations with Transnistria soured. The star and the moon are two sky elements symbolizing the Tengriist (Tengriism) beliefs of the sky-worshiping ancient Turks. In Turkic Mythology (Mythology of the Turkic and Mongolian peoples) four colors are associated with four cardinal directions such as "gök-blue" (east), "ak-white" (west), "al-red" (south) and "kara-black" (north). These colors represent the direction towards the zenith (Zenith) where the Tengri is residing in the sky. Red and white colors on the flag of Turkey symbolize the south-western branch of Turks (Turkic people) called Oghuzes who are the founders of present-day Turkey as well as Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Gagauzia. Black Sea and Turkish (:tr:Akdeniz) Qırımtatar (:crh:Aq deñiz) names of Mediterranean (''Akdeniz'') got their name from the same mythology; '''Kara'''deniz being in the north and '''Ak'''deniz being in the west respectively. Turkestan (East Turkestan)'s flag is similar to Turkey's, with only difference being blue. birth_place Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR death_date DATE OF BIRTH August 12, 1957 PLACE OF BIRTH Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR DATE OF DEATH ::: Possibly a bad thing, but the cure may be even worse if it means putting the Moldova flag on stubs which deal 100% with Transnistria. That (whose flag Transnistria is under) is a sore point for Transnistria, but not so much for Moldova. This is because Moldova lets Transnistria fly its own flag just as they let the autonomous region of Gagauzia also fly its own flag. If we remove any mention of Transnistria, and replace it with the word Moldova, that would not only invite more conflict but would also in many cases even be outright misleading; especially in bio-stub cases where, in some cases, political leaders weren't even born in Moldova. Note also that in Transnistria you now have a new generation coming of age which was born under independence. Putting a Moldovan flag on these people who have ''never'' in their life been subject to Moldovan jurisdiction would indicate POV, especially if we know better and if we already know which solution that will satisfy both sides. Considering the alternatives, I therefore still vote for '''keep''' even though I fully understand your concerns and even share them myself. - Mauco (User:William Mauco) 13:01, 27 April 2006 (UTC)


attempt+amp

and Canada. Unlike most other Turkic speaking people, the Gagauz are predominantly Orthodox Christians. There is a related ethnic group also called ''Gagavuz'' (or ''Gajal'') living in the European part of northwestern Turkey. thumb right 265px Unofficial Gagauz flag. (Image:Wappen Gagausien 01 01.png) Gagauzia declared itself independent on 19 August 1991 – the day of the Moscow coup attempt – followed by Transnistria in September. Some believe


speaking people

and Canada. Unlike most other Turkic speaking people, the Gagauz are predominantly Orthodox Christians. There is a related ethnic group also called ''Gagavuz'' (or ''Gajal'') living in the European part of northwestern Turkey. thumb right 265px Unofficial Gagauz flag. (Image:Wappen Gagausien 01 01.png) Gagauzia declared itself independent on 19 August 1991 – the day of the Moscow coup attempt – followed by Transnistria in September. Some believe

, Christian Orthodox people spoke a Turkish dialect known as Gagauzo, written using the Greek alphabet. In spite of the similarities with the Karamanlides, Greek Orthodox, Turkish-speaking (Turkish language) people native to the Karaman and Cappadocia regions of Anatolia in Turkey. Tanriöver's plans were to establish Gagauz communities in the Turkish region of Marmara, such that these communities would be attached to Autocephalous Turkish Orthodox Patriarchate founded by Eftim I. In 1935, about 70 Gagauz took the offer of the Turkish diplomat and settled down in Turkey. The new immigrants facing a lot of hardship finally converted to Islam. Eftim I was furious sending a letter to the diplomat Hamdullah Suphi Tanriöver, in which asked: "Where are my 70 devotees?" His failure to conserve the Gagauz Christians and to reintegrate them within his church was a great source of deception for him. With the onslaught of the Second World War, plans were put on hold and no further Gagauz were offered to join the church. Geography Leova district is located in the southwest part of the Republic of Moldova. Neighborhood has the following districts: District Hincesti (Hincesti District) in north, east Gagauzia and Cimislia District, Cantemir District in southern and border state with Romania in west, on the river Prut. The relief is generally plain, but with altitudes above 250 m in the northern part of district (the southern extremity of Central Moldavian Plateau) in south elevations of 150–200 m (extreme north of Plateau Tigheci), and 20–100 m. the plains of Prut. Erosion processes with a medium intensity. Geography District is located in the southern part of the Republic of Moldova. Neighborhood has the following district: north Cimislia District, the east boundary (Border) of the state with Ukraine, in the west and south bordering of Gagauzia. Also the district is the smallest area and population of Moldova was. The landscape of the field with maximum altitudes of 210–220 m with a mild erosion processes. Geography Cantemir district is located in the south part of the Republic of Moldova. Neighborhood has the following districts: Leova District in north, east Gagauzia, Cahul District in southern and border state in west to Romania, on the river Prut. The relief is generally hilly plain with the maximum altitude is 301 m hill Tigheci (Tigheci Plateau) in the western part of district. Minimum altitude 10–15 m (Lower Prut Plain ). Erosion processes with a medium intensity. *Paragroup '''F*''' ''Found in Southern India, Sri Lanka, Yunnan, Korea'' *Haplogroup G (Haplogroup G (Y-DNA)) (M201) ca. 21 ka ''Found in many ethnic groups in Eurasia; most common in the Caucasus, Iran, Anatolia and the Levant. Found in almost all European countries, but most common in Gagauzia, southeastern Romania, Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Tyrol (County of Tyrol), and Bohemia with highest concentrations on some Mediterranean islands; uncommon in Northern Europe birth_place Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR death_date DATE OF BIRTH August 12, 1957 PLACE OF BIRTH Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR DATE OF DEATH ::: Possibly a bad thing, but the cure may be even worse if it means putting the Moldova flag on stubs which deal 100% with Transnistria. That (whose flag Transnistria is under) is a sore point for Transnistria, but not so much for Moldova. This is because Moldova lets Transnistria fly its own flag just as they let the autonomous region of Gagauzia also fly its own flag. If we remove any mention of Transnistria, and replace it with the word Moldova, that would not only invite more conflict but would also in many cases even be outright misleading; especially in bio-stub cases where, in some cases, political leaders weren't even born in Moldova. Note also that in Transnistria you now have a new generation coming of age which was born under independence. Putting a Moldovan flag on these people who have ''never'' in their life been subject to Moldovan jurisdiction would indicate POV, especially if we know better and if we already know which solution that will satisfy both sides. Considering the alternatives, I therefore still vote for '''keep''' even though I fully understand your concerns and even share them myself. - Mauco (User:William Mauco) 13:01, 27 April 2006 (UTC)


year term

localities with between 40% and 50% Gagauz which expressed their desire to be included as a result of referendums to determine Gagauzia's borders. In 1995, Georgi Tabunshik was elected to serve as the Governor (Governor of Gagauzia) (Romanian: ''Guvernator'', Gagauz: ''Bașkan'') of Gagauzia for a four-year term, as were the deputies of the local parliament, "The People's Assembly"(Gagauz: "Halk Toplușu"), with Petr Pashali as Chairman of the People's Assembly chairman

'' (Bashkan)). He or she is elected by popular suffrage for a four-year term. He has power over all public administrative bodies of Gagauzia, and is also a member of the Government of the Republic of Moldova. Eligibility for governorship requires fluency in the Gagauz language, Moldovan citizenship, and a minimum age of 35 years. Permanent executive power in Gagauz-Yeri is exercised by the Executive Committee (''Comitetul Executiv'' or ''Bakannik Komiteti''). Its members are appointed


international location

Balkan Gagauz Turkish . The 6th National Conference of the Peasants' Christian Democratic Party of Moldova took place on May 28, 2005. The conference decided to change the name


special legal

;. On December 23, 1994, the Parliament of the Republic of Moldova accepted the "Law on the Special Legal Status of Gagauzia" (Gagauz: ''Gagauz Yeri''), resolving the dispute peacefully. This date is now a Gagauz holiday. Gagauzia is now a "national-territorial autonomous unit" with three official languages, Romanian, Gagauz, and Russian. Three cities and twenty-three communes were included in the Autonomous Gagauz Territory: all localities with over 50% Gagauz, and those localities with between 40% and 50% Gagauz which expressed their desire to be included as a result of referendums to determine Gagauzia's borders. In 1995, Georgi Tabunshik was elected to serve as the Governor (Governor of Gagauzia) (Romanian: ''Guvernator'', Gagauz: ''Bașkan'') of Gagauzia for a four-year term, as were the deputies of the local parliament, "The People's Assembly"(Gagauz: "Halk Toplușu"), with Petr Pashali as chairman (Chairman of the People's Assembly). Dmitrii Croitor won the 1999 Governor elections and began to make use of the rights granted to the Governor by the 1994 agreement. The central authorities of Moldova proved unwilling to accept the results initiating a lengthy stand-off between the autonomy and Chişinău. Finally Croitor resigned in 2002 due to the pressure from the Moldovan government which accused him of abuse of authority, relations with the separatist authorities of Transnistria and other charges. The central electoral commission of Gagauzia did not register Croitor as a candidate for the post of the Governor in the subsequent elections and Gheorgi Tabunshik was elected in what was described as unfair elections. Information on previous elections of Governor of Gagauz ATU birth_place Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR death_date DATE OF BIRTH August 12, 1957 PLACE OF BIRTH Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR DATE OF DEATH ::: Possibly a bad thing, but the cure may be even worse if it means putting the Moldova flag on stubs which deal 100% with Transnistria. That (whose flag Transnistria is under) is a sore point for Transnistria, but not so much for Moldova. This is because Moldova lets Transnistria fly its own flag just as they let the autonomous region of Gagauzia also fly its own flag. If we remove any mention of Transnistria, and replace it with the word Moldova, that would not only invite more conflict but would also in many cases even be outright misleading; especially in bio-stub cases where, in some cases, political leaders weren't even born in Moldova. Note also that in Transnistria you now have a new generation coming of age which was born under independence. Putting a Moldovan flag on these people who have ''never'' in their life been subject to Moldovan jurisdiction would indicate POV, especially if we know better and if we already know which solution that will satisfy both sides. Considering the alternatives, I therefore still vote for '''keep''' even though I fully understand your concerns and even share them myself. - Mauco (User:William Mauco) 13:01, 27 April 2006 (UTC)


international membership

of Moldova (Category:Gagauzia) Category:Territorial units of Moldova Category:States and territories established in 1994 Category:Autonomous regions Category:Autonomous Turkic states Category:Members of the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization Category:Bulgarian-speaking countries and territories


teaching school

authorities do not provide any full Gagauz-teaching school, most of those are Russian-language as opposed to inner Moldovan full Romanian language education. http: meridian-info.com v2 index.php?option com_content&task view&id 490&Itemid 55&lang russian Although pupils are introduced to all four of the usual school languages (Russian, Romanian, English or French, Gagauz), the local language continues to be in last place. http: www.gagauzi.ru 2009-09-22-17-54-41 65-panorama 75-2009-09-23-00-50-30 See also birth_place Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR death_date DATE OF BIRTH August 12, 1957 PLACE OF BIRTH Ceadîr-Lunga, Gagauzia, Moldavian SSR DATE OF DEATH ::: Possibly a bad thing, but the cure may be even worse if it means putting the Moldova flag on stubs which deal 100% with Transnistria. That (whose flag Transnistria is under) is a sore point for Transnistria, but not so much for Moldova. This is because Moldova lets Transnistria fly its own flag just as they let the autonomous region of Gagauzia also fly its own flag. If we remove any mention of Transnistria, and replace it with the word Moldova, that would not only invite more conflict but would also in many cases even be outright misleading; especially in bio-stub cases where, in some cases, political leaders weren't even born in Moldova. Note also that in Transnistria you now have a new generation coming of age which was born under independence. Putting a Moldovan flag on these people who have ''never'' in their life been subject to Moldovan jurisdiction would indicate POV, especially if we know better and if we already know which solution that will satisfy both sides. Considering the alternatives, I therefore still vote for '''keep''' even though I fully understand your concerns and even share them myself. - Mauco (User:William Mauco) 13:01, 27 April 2006 (UTC)


people quot

Moldovan law on the special legal status of Gagauzia Gagauz Halkı is a former Gagauz separatist political party, now outlawed. Elections During the last three elections AEI (Alliance for European Integration)'s vote share increased by 872.4% class "wikitable" style "float:right; font-size:100%; margin: 1em 1em 1em 1em;" + '''Parliament elections results''' - style "background:lightgrey;" ! Year ! AEI (Alliance for European Integration) ! PCRM (Party of Communists of the Republic of Moldova) - style "text-align:center; background

: www.gagauzi.ru 2009-09-22-17-54-41 65-panorama 75-2009-09-23-00-50-30 See also Further reading *Shabashov A.V., 2002, Odessa, Astroprint, ''"Gagauzes: terms of kinship system and origin of the people"'', (Шабашов А.В., ''"Гагаузы: система терминов родства и происхождение народа"'') *

Gagauzia

'''Gagauzia''' (Gagauz (Gagauz language): ''Gagauziya'' or ''Gagauz Yeri''; , ''Gagauziya''), formally known as the '''Autonomous Territorial Unit of Gagauzia (Gagauz Yeri)''' (Gagauz: ''Avtonom Territorial Bölümlüü Gagauz Yeri''; Romanian: ''Unitatea Teritorială Autonomă Găgăuzia''; Russian: Автономное территориальное образование Гагаузия, ''Avtonomnoye territorialnoye obrazovaniye Gagauziya''), is an autonomous region (Autonomous area) of Moldova. Its name comes from the Gagauz people.

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