France

What is France known for?


characters development

-ballet '' by the French (France) playwright Molière. It was first performed in 1673 (1673 in literature#New drama) and was the last work he wrote. In an ironic twist of fate, Molière collapsed during his fourth performance as Argan on 17 February and died soon after. The original play included dance sequences and musical interludes that Marc-Antoine Charpentier composed. Characters Development Development began in France in 1948, when the Arsenal de l'Aéronautique


extravagant quot

with her mother and daughter in Paris, France, where she still resides.'', sourcing my information, and '''removing entirely''' the unsourced information claiming criticism of Arafat's "extravagant" support for Suha's lifestyle. However, my proposals for these edits in the Talk: page were rejected by User:Alberuni Alberuni . Though Alberuni often rejects any edits I make "on principle" (because of his assumption that my edits are always part of some grand and concerted hasbara campaign), his stated concern in this instance was that ''Her age is irrelevant and simply reflects your POV attempts at describing Arafat in a negative light whenever possible. '' I pointed out that there is nothing inherently negative about marrying someone much younger than you and that this was an interesting fact often commented on in the press. Other editors have said much the same thing on this topic, stating ''34 years is an important gap and is worthy of note I believe... I am not sure how it could be seen a smear, I think it reflects well on both of them that they didn't let age (or religion) get in the way of getting married.'' nevertheless I removed this information lest someone might interpret the information negatively. 1 Nov 2004 User:Lance6Wins inserted the claim that Yasser Arafat had brandished a pistol at the U.N., based on a BBC article he brought as a source. I pointed out that the claim was most likely false, and should be removed, and even brought a link from a generally pro-Israeli source in order to convince him that this was the case. Arafat *The Yasser Arafat article originally had this statement concerning his wife near the beginning of his biography: ''Arafat married late in life to a Palestinian Christian, Mrs. Suha Arafat. They have a single child, a daughter. His wife and daughter live in Paris, France. Mrs. Suha Arafat recently became a French citizen. Arafat's support of Suha has been claimed to be extravagant by some media.'' I refactored the information into three sections (based on the generally chronological nature of the article) as this ''In 1990 Arafat married Suha Tawil, a Palestinian Catholic more than 30 years younger than him who worked for the PLO in Tunis, and converted to Islam before marrying him. and this ''In July 1995 he had a daughter Zawha.'' and this ''After the start of the Second Intifada, Arafat's wife moved to live with her mother and daughter in Paris, France, where she still resides.'', sourcing my information, and '''removing entirely''' the unsourced information claiming criticism of Arafat's "extravagant" support for Suha's lifestyle. However, my proposals for these edits in the Talk: page were rejected by User:Alberuni Alberuni . Though Alberuni often rejects any edits I make "on principle" (because of his assumption that my edits are always part of some grand and concerted hasbara campaign), his stated concern in this instance was that ''Her age is irrelevant and simply reflects your POV attempts at describing Arafat in a negative light whenever possible. '' I pointed out that there is nothing inherently negative about marrying someone much younger than you and that this was an interesting fact often commented on in the press. Other editors have said much the same thing on this topic, stating ''34 years is an important gap and is worthy of note I believe... I am not sure how it could be seen a smear, I think it reflects well on both of them that they didn't let age (or religion) get in the way of getting married.'' nevertheless I removed this information lest someone might interpret the information negatively. 1 Nov 2004 User:Lance6Wins inserted the claim that Yasser Arafat had brandished a pistol at the U.N., based on a BBC article he brought as a source. I pointed out that the claim was most likely false, and should be removed, and even brought a link from a generally pro-Israeli source in order to convince him that this was the case. was born in Lyon, in Rhône (Rhône (département)), France, the son of Joseph François Termier and Jeanne Mollard. At the age of 18 he entered the Polytechnic School, then the Paris School of Mines in 1880. After graduation he became professor at the school of mines at Saint-Etienne. In 1894 he left for Paris, where he would teach for the remainder of his career. The first ascent, in 1955, was by a Franco (France)-Swiss (Switzerland) expedition led by Raymond Lambert, via the Southeast Face and Ridge. The ascent was most notable for the presence of a woman, Claude Kogan, in the summit party, which was very rare at the time. Lambert, Kogan, and Eric Gauchat achieved the summit, but Gauchat fell to his death on the descent. 200px right thumb Arnaud Montebourg in April 2005 (Image:Montebourg Arnaud (2).jpg) '''Arnaud Montebourg''' (born October 30, 1962, in Clamecy (Clamecy, Nièvre), Nièvre) is a French (France) politician, and a deputy of the fifth district of Saône-et-Loire to the French National Assembly for the Socialist Party (French Socialist Party). He has also been elected president of the local assembly of Saône et Loire after local elections in 2008. Montebourg was also candidate to the socialist presidential primary of 2011 (French Socialist Party presidential primary, 2011). History 714-X was developed by Gaston Naessens, a native of France tried there for practicing medicine without a license. Naessens moved to Quebec and continued his research since the early 1970s. In 1989 He was arrested but acquitted from charges of accessory to murder, after a cancer patient using 714-X died following refusal to take conventional medical treatment. Armistice Great Britain signed preliminary articles of peace with France and Spain on January 20, 1783, Boatner, ''Encyclopedia'', 848. and, on February 4, 1783, Britain announced the cessation of hostilities. Boatner, ''Encyclopedia'', 847. *In 1995, French director Christophe Gans directed a French (France) and Canadian (Canada)-produced film adaptation of ''Crying Freeman (Crying Freeman (film))'' starring Mark Dacascos. It had a wide release in Canada, Europe and Asia, but was never shown in the United States. IMDb - Crying Freeman (1995) Schuss was also the unofficial mascot of the 1968 Winter Olympics in Grenoble, France, featuring a cartoon character wearing skis. Ever since then, every Olympic Games has had a mascot (excluding the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan). The character was seen on pins and small toys, though the character was never made into a plush. Commons:Category:France WikiPedia:France Dmoz:Regional Europe France


including sharp

was ready to challenge Mickiewicz for a duel; that did not come to pass but from that moment on, Słowacki would see Mickiewicz as his main rival. Alicja Dzisiewicz ''Nad Wilnem grzmiało...'', ''Magazyn Wileński'', 8 2007 Few days later, antagonized by worsening reception of his works among the Polish émigré community in Paris, including sharp criticism from Mickiewicz, Słowacki left


past+fossil

of the Sea ''. Commons:Category:France WikiPedia:France Dmoz:Regional Europe France


art life

in Grenada in 1649. '''André Lhote''' (5 July 1885 – 25 January 1962) was a French (France) sculptor (sculpture) and painter (painting) of figure subjects (figure painting), portraits, landscapes (Landscape art) and still life. He was also very active and influential as a teacher and writer on art. Life The '''Modified Hotchkiss''' machine gun was a Greek (Greece) improvement of the French (France) ''Hotchkiss M1926'', in turn an evolution


professional playing

David Platt Arsenal profile publisher Sporting-heroes.net date accessdate 2012-02-24 Chutes in transportation Goust, a hamlet in southwestern France, is notable for its mountainside chute that is used to transport coffins. '''Cyrille Regis''', MBE (Order of the British Empire) (born 9 February 1958) is a French (France)-born English (England) former footballer (football (soccer)). His professional playing career spanned 19 years, where he made 610

years, it did not have a chance to develop into a true Parliament. country France released March 9, 1945 (France) November 15, 1946 (USA) runtime 190 min (uncut version on DVD) '''Mary Pierce''' (born 15 January 1975, in Montreal, Canada) is a French-American (French American) tennis professional playing on the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) tour (WTA Tour). She is a citizen of France, Canada, and the United States but plays for France in team competitions and the Olympics (Summer Olympic Games). Vickers was always interested in machinery and mechanics and was a self-taught master machinist. He served in World War I in France with the US Army Signal Corps, where he learned about the first generations of electronics and radio. Returning to southern California after the war, he founded Vickers Manufacturing Co., later to be called Vickers Inc. Flint, Peter B., "Harry F. Vickers, 78, of Sperry Rand, dies", ''The New York Times'', New York, 13 January 1977. The first successful consumer application came in 1929. The BSA (BSA cars) (Birmingham Small Arms Company) produced the unique front-wheel-drive BSA three-wheeler. Production continued until 1936 during which time sports and touring models were available. In 1931 the DKW F1 from Germany made its debut. Other German car producers followed: Stoewer offered a car with front-wheel drive in 1931, Adler (Adler (automobile)) in 1932 and Audi in 1933. In 1934, the very successful Traction Avant (Citroën Traction Avant) cars were introduced by Citroën of France. The Cord 810 (Cord Automobile#Cord Model 810) of the United States managed a bit better in the late 1930s than its predecessor one decade earlier. These vehicles featured a layout that places the engine behind the transmission, running "backwards," (save for the Cord, which drove the transmission from the front of the engine). The basic front-wheel-drive layout provides sharp turning, and better weight distribution creates "positive handling characteristics" due to its low polar inertia and relatively favourable weight distribution. "Cord front-drive car is here", ''The New York Times''. April 12, 1936. p. XX7. (The heaviest component is near the centre of the car, making the main component of its moment of inertia relatively low). Another result of this design is a lengthened chassis. Early life and political activities Võ Chí Công was born as '''Võ Toàn''' in Quảng Nam, French Indochina (Quang Nam Province) in 1912. He first became politically active in 1930, when he joined with Phan Bội Châu (Phan Boi Chau) and Phan Chu Trinh, two early Vietnamese nationalists who opposed the French (France) colonial regime (French Indochina). He joined the Communist Party of Indochina in 1935, "Vo Chi Cong, Vietnamese leader, is dead at 99". ''New York Times'', 15 September 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-24. and fought with the Vietnamese resistance against the Vichy French during World War II. He was arrested for his resistance activities in 1942. Commons:Category:France WikiPedia:France Dmoz:Regional Europe France


award made

Commons:Category:France WikiPedia:France Dmoz:Regional Europe France


films television

) is the vernacular (people's) culture that prevails in Canadian (Canada) society. Canadian popular culture is influenced by Canada's British (Great Britain) and French (France) ancestry. Canadian pop culture is also influenced by the United States, which borders Canada to the south; US films, television shows and magazines dominate the Canadian media system. However, Canadians themselves play a large role in the US entertainment industry as leading actors, actresses, writers, directors, producers, technical crews, as well as providing film locations (though rarely if ever will the setting be Canadian). Canadian pop culture is also influenced by the diverse cultures of its immigrant communities, which include substantial populations from China and India.'"; Name and discovery The mineral was first described in 1899 by French scientists M. M. C. Freidel and E. Cumenge, who identified it in specimens from Roc Creek in Montrose County, Colorado, United States. Robert J. Wright and Donald L. Everhart (1960) ''Uranium'', in ''Mineral Resources of Colorado First Sequel'', State of Colorado Mineral Resources Board, p.330-331. It is named for Marie Adolphe Carnot (1839 - 1920), French (France) mining engineer and chemist. Summary The preamble of the constitution recalls the ''Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen'' from 1789 and establishes France as a secular and democratic (democracy) country, deriving its sovereignty from the people. It tells the story John Renshaw Starr, an officer of the British Special Operations Executive sent to establish the Acrobat Network in north-eastern France during the Second World War. The '''Battle of the Saintes''' (known to the French as the '''Bataille de la Dominique''', or '''Battle of Dominica''') took place over 4 days, 9 April 1782 – 12 April 1782, during the American War of Independence, and was a victory of a British (Kingdom of Great Britain) fleet under Admiral Sir George Rodney over a French (France) fleet under the Comte de Grasse forcing the French and Spanish to abandon a planned invasion of Jamaica. Colchicine was first isolated in 1820 by the French (France) chemists P.S. Pelletier and J. Caventon. Pelletier PS, Caventon J. Ann. Chim. Phys. 1820;14:69. In 1833, P.L. Geiger purified an active ingredient, which he named colchicine. 81. Geiger, P. L. Ann. Chem. Pharm. (later, Liebigs .Vnn.) 7:274. 1833. The chemical was later Commons:Category:France WikiPedia:France Dmoz:Regional Europe France


fishing history

historical period of the island, the 16th century, French (France) explorers found members of the Neutral Nation of Native Americans, also known as the Attawandaron, living on the island; by 1651, the nearby Seneca Nation (Seneca tribe) had chased off or killed the Neutrals, having also absorbed some of the survivors. The Seneca used the island for hunting and fishing. History Two forts were built (c. 1731) near the current location of the town, Fort St. Frédéric by the France French


strong classical

;D-Day beaches" of Normandy *Climb to the top of Mont Saint Michel *Explore Chartres Cathedral *See the quaintness of the Alsace *Sunbathe on the beaches of the French Riviera Classical music Like neighbouring Germany and Italy, France is also known for having a very strong classical music tradition. French composers who are well-known among classical music circles, and even to many members of the general public, include the likes of Debussy, Bizet, Saint

France

'''France''' ( and has a population of 66.6 million. It is a semi-presidential (Semi-presidential system) republic with its capital (Capital city) in Paris, the nation's largest city and the main cultural and commercial center. The Constitution of France establishes the country as secular (Laïcité) and democratic, with its sovereignty derived from the people.

During the Iron Age, what is now France was inhabited by the Gauls, a Celtic (Celts) people. The Gauls were conquered by the Roman Empire in 51 BC, which held Gaul until 486. The Gallo-Romans faced raids and migration from the Germanic (Germanic peoples) Franks, who dominated the region for hundreds of years, eventually creating the medieval Kingdom of France. France has been a major power in Europe since the Late Middle Ages, with its victory in the Hundred Years' War (1337 to 1453) strengthening French state-building and paving the way for a future centralized absolute monarchy. During the Renaissance (French Renaissance), France experienced a vast cultural development and established the first steps of a worldwide colonial empire (French colonial empire). The 16th century was dominated by Religious Civil Wars (French Wars of Religion) primarily fought between Catholics (Roman Catholic Church) and Protestants (Protestantism) (Huguenots).

Louis XIV made France the dominant cultural, political and military power in Europe, but by the late 18th century, the monarchy was overthrown in the French Revolution. One legacy of the revolution was the ''Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen'', one of the world's earliest documents on human rights, which expresses the nation's ideals to this day. France was governed as one of history's earliest Republics (French First Republic), until the Empire (First French Empire) was declared by Napoleon Bonaparte, who dominated European affairs and had a long-lasting impact on Western culture. Following his defeat, France endured a tumultuous succession of governments: an absolute monarchy was restored (Bourbon Restoration), replaced in 1830 by a constitutional monarchy (July monarchy), then briefly by a Second Republic (French Second Republic), and then by a Second Empire (Second French Empire), until a more lasting French Third Republic was established in 1870.

France's colonial empire reached the height of global prominence during the 19th and early 20th centuries, when it possessed the second-largest colonial empire (French colonial empire) in the world. In World War I, France was one of the Triple Entente powers fighting against Germany and the Central Powers. France was one of the Allied Powers (Allies of World War II) in World War II, but it was occupied (German military administration in occupied France during World War II) by Nazi Germany in 1940. Following liberation (liberation of France) in 1944, a Fourth Republic (French Fourth Republic) was established, but it was dissolved in the course of the Algerian War and replaced by the Charles de Gaulle-led French Fifth Republic. Into the 1960s decolonization saw most of the French colonial empire become independent.

Throughout its long history (History of France), France has produced many influential artists, thinkers, and scientists, and remains a prominent global center of culture. It hosts the world's fourth-largest (List of World Heritage Sites in France) number of cultural UNESCO World Heritage Sites and receives around 83 million foreign tourists annually – the most of any country in the world. . Centre national de documentation pédagogique, "2011, ANNÉE DES OUTRE-MER"

French citizens enjoy a high standard of living, and the country performs well in international rankings (International rankings of France) of education (Education Index), health care (Health care in France), life expectancy (List of countries by life expectancy), civil liberties, and human development (Human Development Index). France is a founding member of the United Nations, where it serves as one of the five permanent members of the UN Security Council (Permanent members of the United Nations Security Council). It is a member of numerous international institutions, including the Group of 7 (G7), North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) (NATO), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the World Trade Organization (WTO), and La Francophonie (Organisation internationale de la Francophonie). France is a founding and leading member state of the EU (member state of the European Union).

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