Farm Security Administration

What is Farm Security Administration known for?


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. The key concepts that guided the FSA's tenant removals were: the definition of rural poverty as rooted in the problem of tenancy; the belief that economic success entailed particular cultural practices and social forms; and the commitment by those with political power to gain local support. These assumptions undergirded acceptance of racial segregation and the criteria used to select new settlers. Alternatives could only become visible through political or legal action—capacities sharecroppers

supported civil rights legislation, including bans on lynching and poll taxes. He opposed the Taft-Hartley Act and voted to disband the House Un-American Activities Committee. Pearce, p. 48 His service on the Select House Committee on Food Shortages gave him the chance to interact closely with President (President of the United States) Harry S. Truman. ref name kygovs186 >


parks

the plight of poor farmers. The Information Division of the FSA was responsible for providing educational materials and press information to the public. Under Roy Stryker, the Information Division of the FSA adopted a goal of "introducing America to Americans." Many of the most famous Depression-era photographers were fostered by the FSA project. Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Gordon Parks were three of the most famous FSA alumni. The FSA was also cited in Gordon

Parks ' autobiographical novel, "A Choice of Weapons." The photographers The FSA photography group consisted of Theodor Jung, Edwin Rosskam, Louise Rosskam, Ben Shahn, John Collier (John Collier (anthropologist)), Sheldon Dick, Ann Rosener and Image:Jack Delano 8b00038r.jpg Jack Delano Sheldon Dick Image:Walker Evans 1937-02.jpg Walker Evans Theodor Jung Image:Lange car.jpg

Dorothea Lange Image:Russell Lee.jpg Russell Lee (Russell Lee (photographer)) File:Carl Mydans 00271u original.jpg Carl Mydans Image:Gordon Parks.jpg Gordon Parks Edwin Rosskam Louise Rosskam Image:Arthur Rothstein 8a22587r.jpg Arthur Rothstein Ben Shahn Image:John Vachon 8c51722r.jpg John Vachon Image:MarionPostWolcott.jpg Marion Post Wolcott Eleven


documentary

seldom had. However, in succeeding decades, these modernizing assumptions created conditions for Delta African Americans on resettlement projects to challenge white supremacy. Jane Adams and D. Gorton, "This Land Ain't My Land: The Eviction of Sharecroppers by the Farm Security Administration," ''Agricultural History'' Summer 2009, Vol. 83 Issue 3, pp 323-51 FSA and its contribution to society The Documentary photography genre describes photographs

that would work as a time capsule for evidence in the future or a certain method that a person can use for a frame of reference. Facts presented in a photograph can speak for themselves after the viewer gets time to analyze it. Documentary photography does not just stop there by taking pictures of human beings in poor conditions; it also runs in the veins of several aspects of society. Photographs of revolutions, accidents, or speeches all fall under that same style, as we could tell from

the picture what went on because it simply was taken in order to let others be aware of what was happening during that period. Graham Clarke, The Photograph (New York: Oxford University of Art, 1997), 145-166 Not only that, but also the concept of manipulating the picture is available in documentary photography and it all falls at the end of the day under the decision of the photographer. For example, lining up the characters in the picture may strengthen the message


annual field

at the annual field day of the FSA (Farm Security Administration) farmworkers community, Yuma, Arizona '''Horseshoes''' is an outdoor game played between two people (or two teams of two people) using four horseshoes and two throwing targets (stakes) set in a sandbox area. The game is played by the players alternating turns tossing horseshoes at stakes in the ground, which are traditionally placed 40 feet (foot (length)) apart. Modern games use a more stylized U-shaped bar, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002. Government While nominally remaining on the employment rolls of the Farm Security Administration, Silvermaster arranged in 1942 to be detailed to the Board of Economic Warfare. The transfer, however, triggered objections from military counter-intelligence who suspected he was a hidden Communist and regarded him as a security risk. On July 16, 1942 the U.S. Civil Service Commission recommended ''"Cancel eligibilities ... and bar him for the duration of the National Emergency (World War II)."'' Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish immigrants Louis and Ida Bubley. In 1936, while Esther was a senior at Central High School in Superior, Wisconsin, the photo magazine ''Life (Life (magazine))'' first hit the newsstands. Inspired by the magazine, and particularly by the pictures of the Great Depression produced by the Farm Security Administration, she developed a passion for photojournalism and documentary photography. As editor-in-chief of the yearbook, she sought to emulate the style of ''Life.'' After high school, Esther spent two years at Superior State Teachers College (now the University of Wisconsin–Superior) before enrolling in the one-year photography program at the Minneapolis School of Art (now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design). In 1938, he bought his first camera and experimented with both documentary (w:Documentary photography) and fashion photography (w:fashion photography). At age 30, he won a fellowship and traveled to Washington, D.C. (w:Washington, D.C.), where he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (w:Farm Security Administration) and later for the Office of War Information (w:Office of War Information).


working

and Resettlement Agency exposed American living and working conditions. He also worked for these agencies as a graphic artist and painter. Shahn’s fresco mural for the community center of Jersey Homesteads is among his most famous works, but the government also hired Shahn to execute the Bronx Central Annex Post Office and Social Security murals. In 1939, Shahn and his wife produced a set of 13 murals inspired by Walt Whitman's poem ''I See America Working

photographer sideline. He began to chronicle the city's South Side black ghetto and in 1941, an exhibition of those photographs won Parks a photography fellowship with the Farm Security Administration(FSA). Working as a trainee under Roy Stryker, Parks created one of his best-known photographs, ''American Gothic, Washington, D.C.'' Yvonne Shinhoster Lamb.

in the segregated city. Upon viewing it, Stryker said that it was an indictment of America, and could get all of his photographers fired; he urged Parks to keep working with Watson, however, leading to a series of photos of her daily life. Parks said later that his first image was overdone and not subtle; other commentators have argued that it drew strength from its polemical nature


documentary films

, plus 644 color images from 1600 negatives. Documentary films The Resettlement Administration also funded two documentary films by Pare Lorentz, The Plow That Broke the Plains about the creation of the Dust Bowl and The River (The River (1938 film)) about the importance of the Mississippi River. The films were deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry

, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films


art projects

executed the infamous Rockefeller Center mural. Shahn had a role in fanning the controversy, by circulating a petition among the workers. Also during this period, Shahn met photojournalist Bernarda Bryson (Bernarda Bryson Shahn), who would later become his second wife. Although this marriage was successful, the mural, his 1934 project for the Public Works of Art Projects and proposal for the Municipal Art Commission were all failures. Fortunately, in 1935


historic record

are virtually invisible in the historic record. The resettlement projects were part of larger efforts to modernize rural America. "Modernization" is a complex process whereby a relatively specific set of assumptions and behaviors make other assumptions and behaviors "wrong," both morally and pragmatically. The removal of former tenants and their replacement by FSA clients in the lower Mississippi alluvial plain—the Delta—reveals core elements of New Deal modernizing policies


local support

. The key concepts that guided the FSA's tenant removals were: the definition of rural poverty as rooted in the problem of tenancy; the belief that economic success entailed particular cultural practices and social forms; and the commitment by those with political power to gain local support. These assumptions undergirded acceptance of racial segregation and the criteria used to select new settlers. Alternatives could only become visible through political or legal action—capacities sharecroppers


quot related

under instruction from Washington as to what overall impression the New Deal wanted to portray. Stryker's agenda focused on his faith in social engineering, the poor conditions among tenant cotton farmers, and the very poor conditions among migrant farm workers; above all he was committed to social reform through New Deal intervention in people's lives. Stryker demanded photographs that "related people to the land and vice versa" because these photographs reinforced the RA's position that poverty could be controlled by "changing land practices." Though Stryker did not dictate to his photographers how they should compose the shots, he did send them lists of desirable themes, for example, "church," "court day," "barns." Stryker sought photographs of migratory workers that would tell a story about how they lived day-to-day. He asked Dorothea Lange to emphasize cooking, sleeping, praying and socializing. Finnegan 43-44 RA-FSA made 250,000 images of rural poverty. Fewer than half of those images survive and are housed in the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. The Library has placed all 164,000 developed negatives online. Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish immigrants Louis and Ida Bubley. In 1936, while Esther was a senior at Central High School in Superior, Wisconsin, the photo magazine ''Life (Life (magazine))'' first hit the newsstands. Inspired by the magazine, and particularly by the pictures of the Great Depression produced by the Farm Security Administration, she developed a passion for photojournalism and documentary photography. As editor-in-chief of the yearbook, she sought to emulate the style of ''Life.'' After high school, Esther spent two years at Superior State Teachers College (now the University of Wisconsin–Superior) before enrolling in the one-year photography program at the Minneapolis School of Art (now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design). In 1938, he bought his first camera and experimented with both documentary (w:Documentary photography) and fashion photography (w:fashion photography). At age 30, he won a fellowship and traveled to Washington, D.C. (w:Washington, D.C.), where he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (w:Farm Security Administration) and later for the Office of War Information (w:Office of War Information).

Farm Security Administration

thumb Photo by Walker Evans (Image:Allie Mae Burroughs print.jpg) of Allie Mae Burroughs, a symbol of the great depression. thumb Photo of sharecropper (Image:Floyd Burroughs sharecropper.jpg) Floyd Burroughs by Walker Evans.

Initially created as the Resettlement Administration (RA) in 1935 as part of the New Deal in the United States, the '''Farm Security Administration''' ('''FSA''') was an effort during the Depression to combat American rural poverty. last Gabbert first Jim title Resettlement Administration encyclopedia Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture publisher Oklahoma Historical Society accessdate 2013-09-01 url http: digital.library.okstate.edu encyclopedia entries R RE032.html

The FSA stressed "rural rehabilitation" efforts to improve the lifestyle of sharecroppers, tenants, very poor landowning farmers, and a program to purchase submarginal land owned by poor farmers and resettle them in group farms on land more suitable for efficient farming. Critics, including the Farm Bureau, strongly opposed the FSA as an experiment in collectivizing agriculture (Collective farming) — that is, in bringing farmers together to work on large government-owned farms using modern techniques under the supervision of experts. After the Conservative coalition took control of Congress it transformed the FSA into a program to help poor farmers buy land, and that program continues to operate in the 21st century as the '''Farmers Home Administration.'''

The FSA is famous for its small but highly influential photography program, 1935–44, that portrayed the challenges of rural poverty.

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