Farm Security Administration

What is Farm Security Administration known for?


iconic

captured iconic images of the storms and migrant families, the most famous of which was known as "migrant mother", which depicted a gaunt-looking woman, Florence Owens Thompson, holding her three children. This picture captured the horrors of the dust bowl and caused more people to be aware of the crisis of the country. The work of independent artists, such as folk singer Woody Guthrie and American novelist John Steinbeck (''The Grapes of Wrath''), was also

- and on-duty. Other of Jacobs's images capture the earnestness of young aviation cadets, the humiliation of a Japanese prisoner of war on the deck of an aircraft carrier, and melancholy scenes of Navy pilots on leave with their dates. His photos incorporate wit, keen observation and empathy. His photograph of an African-American woman on a bench grieving Roosevelt's death is iconic. When the war ended, Jacobs and two of his colleagues, Horace Bristol and Victor Jorgensen, still dressed

to compile what has been called "the greatest documentary collection ever been assembled" in 1973. Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas


football biography

in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish


+documentary+films

, plus 644 color images from 1600 negatives. Documentary films The Resettlement Administration also funded two documentary films by Pare Lorentz, The Plow That Broke the Plains about the creation of the Dust Bowl and The River (The River (1938 film)) about the importance of the Mississippi River. The films were deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry

, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films


influential

to help poor farmers buy land, and that program continues to operate in the 21st century as the '''Farmers Home Administration.''' The FSA is famous for its small but highly influential photography program, 1935–44, that portrayed the challenges of rural poverty. Origins The projects that were combined in 1935 to form the RA started in 1933 as an assortment of programs tried out by the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. The RA was headed by Rexford Tugwell, an economic advisor

socialistic to some and threatened to deprive influential farm owners of their tenant workforce. The RA was thus left with only enough resources to relocate a few thousand people from and build several greenbelt cities, which planners admired as models for a cooperative future that never arrived. The main focus of the RA was to now build relief camps in California for migratory workers, especially

Depression , and their motto was simply as Beaumont Newhall insists, “not to inform us, but to move us.” Those photographers wanted the government to move and give a hand to the people as they were completely neglected and overlooked and thus they decided to start taking photographs in a style that we today call “documentary photography.” The FSA photography has been influential thanks to its realist point of view, and the fact that it works as frame


portraits depicting

situations and he photographed many aspects of rural life. These photographs serves as the basis for a series of genre portraits' depicting southern black life. In 1940 he completed ''Tobacco Farmer'', the portrait of a young black farmer in white overalls and a blue shirt with a youthful yet serious look upon his face, sitting in front of the landscape and buildings he works


genre portraits

situations and he photographed many aspects of rural life. These photographs serves as the basis for a series of genre portraits' depicting southern black life. In 1940 he completed ''Tobacco Farmer'', the portrait of a young black farmer in white overalls and a blue shirt with a youthful yet serious look upon his face, sitting in front of the landscape and buildings he works


films

, plus 644 color images from 1600 negatives. Documentary films The Resettlement Administration also funded two documentary films by Pare Lorentz, The Plow That Broke the Plains about the creation of the Dust Bowl and The River (The River (1938 film)) about the importance of the Mississippi River. The films were deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry

, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films

on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002. Government While nominally remaining on the employment rolls of the Farm Security Administration, Silvermaster arranged in 1942 to be detailed to the Board of Economic Warfare. The transfer, however, triggered objections from military counter-intelligence who suspected he was a hidden Communist and regarded him as a security


world history

under estimated the photographers ability to produce images that breathed a humanistic social visual catalyst found in novels, theatrical productions and music of the time, these images are now regarded as a “national treasure” in the United States; which is why this project is regarded as a work of art. File:Pabst Blue


significant quot

, plus 644 color images from 1600 negatives. Documentary films The Resettlement Administration also funded two documentary films by Pare Lorentz, The Plow That Broke the Plains about the creation of the Dust Bowl and The River (The River (1938 film)) about the importance of the Mississippi River. The films were deemed "culturally significant" by the United States Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry. Reformers ousted; Farmers Home Administration After the war started and there were millions of unfilled factory jobs in the cities, there was no need for FSA. In late 1942 Roosevelt moved the housing programs to the National Housing Agency, and in 1943, Congress greatly reduced FSA's activities. The photographic unit was subsumed by the Office of War Information for one year then disbanded. Finally in 1946 all the social reformers had left and FSA was replaced by a new agency, the Farmers Home Administration, which had the goal of helping finance farm purchases by tenants—and especially by war veterans—with no personal oversight by experts. It became part of Lyndon Johnson's war on poverty in the 1960s, with a greatly expanded budget to facilitate loans to low-income rural families and cooperatives, injecting $4.2 billion into rural America. Baldwin 403 Footnotes Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish immigrants Louis and Ida Bubley. In 1936, while Esther was a senior at Central High School in Superior, Wisconsin, the photo magazine ''Life (Life (magazine))'' first hit the newsstands. Inspired by the magazine, and particularly by the pictures of the Great Depression produced by the Farm Security Administration, she developed a passion for photojournalism and documentary photography. As editor-in-chief of the yearbook, she sought to emulate the style of ''Life.'' After high school, Esther spent two years at Superior State Teachers College (now the University of Wisconsin–Superior) before enrolling in the one-year photography program at the Minneapolis School of Art (now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design). In 1938, he bought his first camera and experimented with both documentary (w:Documentary photography) and fashion photography (w:fashion photography). At age 30, he won a fellowship and traveled to Washington, D.C. (w:Washington, D.C.), where he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (w:Farm Security Administration) and later for the Office of War Information (w:Office of War Information).


annual field

at the annual field day of the FSA (Farm Security Administration) farmworkers community, Yuma, Arizona '''Horseshoes''' is an outdoor game played between two people (or two teams of two people) using four horseshoes and two throwing targets (stakes) set in a sandbox area. The game is played by the players alternating turns tossing horseshoes at stakes in the ground, which are traditionally placed 40 feet (foot (length)) apart. Modern games use a more stylized U-shaped bar, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002. Government While nominally remaining on the employment rolls of the Farm Security Administration, Silvermaster arranged in 1942 to be detailed to the Board of Economic Warfare. The transfer, however, triggered objections from military counter-intelligence who suspected he was a hidden Communist and regarded him as a security risk. On July 16, 1942 the U.S. Civil Service Commission recommended ''"Cancel eligibilities ... and bar him for the duration of the National Emergency (World War II)."'' Lee is responsible for some of the iconic images produced by the FSA, including photographic studies of San Augustine, Texas in 1939, and Pie Town, New Mexico in 1940. *Ryan McDonagh - Defenseman, New York Rangers *John Vachon - Photographer for the FSA (Farm Security Administration), ''Life (Life (magazine))'' magazine, and ''Look (Look (American magazine))'' magazine *Seantrel Henderson - 2009 USA Today Offensive Player of the Year (American Football) Biography Esther Bubley was born February 16, 1921 in Phillips, Wisconsin, the fourth of five children of Russian-Jewish immigrants Louis and Ida Bubley. In 1936, while Esther was a senior at Central High School in Superior, Wisconsin, the photo magazine ''Life (Life (magazine))'' first hit the newsstands. Inspired by the magazine, and particularly by the pictures of the Great Depression produced by the Farm Security Administration, she developed a passion for photojournalism and documentary photography. As editor-in-chief of the yearbook, she sought to emulate the style of ''Life.'' After high school, Esther spent two years at Superior State Teachers College (now the University of Wisconsin–Superior) before enrolling in the one-year photography program at the Minneapolis School of Art (now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design). In 1938, he bought his first camera and experimented with both documentary (w:Documentary photography) and fashion photography (w:fashion photography). At age 30, he won a fellowship and traveled to Washington, D.C. (w:Washington, D.C.), where he worked as a photographer for the Farm Security Administration (w:Farm Security Administration) and later for the Office of War Information (w:Office of War Information).

Farm Security Administration

thumb Photo by Walker Evans (Image:Allie Mae Burroughs print.jpg) of Allie Mae Burroughs, a symbol of the great depression. thumb Photo of sharecropper (Image:Floyd Burroughs sharecropper.jpg) Floyd Burroughs by Walker Evans.

Initially created as the Resettlement Administration (RA) in 1935 as part of the New Deal in the United States, the '''Farm Security Administration''' ('''FSA''') was an effort during the Depression to combat American rural poverty. last Gabbert first Jim title Resettlement Administration encyclopedia Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture publisher Oklahoma Historical Society accessdate 2013-09-01 url http: digital.library.okstate.edu encyclopedia entries R RE032.html

The FSA stressed "rural rehabilitation" efforts to improve the lifestyle of sharecroppers, tenants, very poor landowning farmers, and a program to purchase submarginal land owned by poor farmers and resettle them in group farms on land more suitable for efficient farming. Critics, including the Farm Bureau, strongly opposed the FSA as an experiment in collectivizing agriculture (Collective farming) — that is, in bringing farmers together to work on large government-owned farms using modern techniques under the supervision of experts. After the Conservative coalition took control of Congress it transformed the FSA into a program to help poor farmers buy land, and that program continues to operate in the 21st century as the '''Farmers Home Administration.'''

The FSA is famous for its small but highly influential photography program, 1935–44, that portrayed the challenges of rural poverty.

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