Famagusta

What is Famagusta known for?


unique+buildings

many unique buildings. The city is also home to the Eastern Mediterranean University. Famagusta has a walled city popular with tourists Tolgay, Ahmet. Sur içi sendromu: Bir Lefkoşa – Mağusa kıyaslaması... (Kıbrıs (Kıbrıs (newspaper))) and a vibrant nightlife. Mağusa geceleri capcanlı ( Kıbrıs


previous period

that indicated he would be given viceregal rank (Viceroy) in that colony. Morris, p.154 Nasi's relative Abraham Beneviste (''Righetto Marrano'') was arrested in 1570, on charges of having set fire to the Venetian Arsenal on Nasi's instigation. Urman & McCracken Flesher, p.63 The beginning of the Late Bronze Age does not differ from the closing years of the previous period. Unrest, tension and anxiety mark all these years, probably


painting+poetry

the most fertile kind of cultural activity in the area, with Famagusta as its hub and centre. Painting, poetry, music and drama were finding expression in innumerable exhibitions, folk art festivals and plays enacted in the nearby-reconstructed ruins of the ancient Greek theatre of Salamis. There has not been an official census since 1960 but the population of the town in 1974 was estimated to be around 60,000 not counting about 12,000–15,000 persons commuting daily from the surrounding villages and suburbs to work in Famagusta. This population would swell during the peak summer tourist period to about 90,000–100,000 with the influx of tourists from numerous European countries (Europe), mainly Britain (United Kingdom), France, Germany and the Scandinavian countries. 1974 During the second phase of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus on 14 August 1974 the Mesaoria plain was overrun by Turkish tanks and Famagusta bombed by Turkish aircraft. In two days the Turkish Army occupied the city, which had been completely evacuated by its Greek Cypriot population, who had fled into surrounding fields before the army's arrival. Most believed that once the initial violence calmed down they would be allowed to return.


centuries year

Ottoman Centuries year 2002 publisher Harper Perennial isbn 978-0-688-08093-8 Lord Kinross, in his book, ''The Ottoman Centuries'', describes the situation before the siege as follows:


poetry music

the most fertile kind of cultural activity in the area, with Famagusta as its hub and centre. Painting, poetry, music and drama were finding expression in innumerable exhibitions, folk art festivals and plays enacted in the nearby-reconstructed ruins of the ancient Greek theatre of Salamis. There has not been an official census since 1960 but the population of the town in 1974 was estimated to be around 60,000 not counting about 12,000–15,000 persons commuting daily from the surrounding


quot significant

Association of Turkish Students date accessdate 2010-11-21 DATE OF BIRTH 1964 PLACE OF BIRTH Famagusta, Cyprus DATE OF DEATH In 2006 the Turkish government began discussions for Northern Cyprus's main port Famagusta, and main civilian airport Ercan, to be able to operate direct connections with the UK government describing it as a "significant and creative offer".


dance shows

. Currently, it enjoys industry based on tourism, service, and education. It has a 115-acre free port (List of free ports). ''Guide to Foreign Investors'' (2004), TRNC State Planning Organization, p. 18-19. Culture Every year, the International Famagusta Art and Culture Festival is organized in Famagusta. Concerts, dance shows and theater plays take place during the festival.


time making

Some Azali sources take these allegations against him and re-apply them to Bahá'u'lláh, even claiming that he poisoned himself. Mirza Aqa Khan Kirmani made this claim later in his ''Hasht-Bihisht''. This book is abstracted in part by E.G. Browne in "Note W" of his translation of ''A Traveller's Narrative'',


industry based


246

;Barrett p. 246" Currently there are five to seven million Bahá'ís. Encyclopedia of Religion, second edition, vol 2, pg. 739, (ISBN 0-02-865733-0) See also Bahá'í statistics The walls

manifest" and his followers began calling themselves Bahá'ís (Bahá'í Faith). By 1908 there were probably from half a million to a million Bahá'ís, and at most only a hundred followers of Subhh-i-Azal. Subh-i Azal died in Famagusta, Cyprus in 1912, and his followers are known as Azalis or Azali Bábis. MacEoin notes that after the deaths of those Azali

Babis who were active in the Constitutional Revolution (Iranian Constitutional Revolution) in Iran, the Azali form of Babism entered a stagnation which it has not recovered as there is no acknowledged leader or central organization. Current estimates are that there are no more than a few thousand.

Famagusta

'''Famagusta''' ) is a city on the east coast of Cyprus. ''De facto'', it is the capital of the Gazimağusa District of Northern Cyprus. It is located east of Nicosia (Nicosia District), and possesses the deepest harbour of the island. During the medieval period (especially under the maritime republics of Genoa (Republic of Genoa) and Venice (Republic of Venice)), Famagusta was the island's most important port city, and a gateway to trade with the ports of the Levant, from where the Silk Road merchants carried their goods to Western Europe.

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017