Edo

What is Edo known for?


history tradition

into Japanese territory. They asked that he travel to the town of Matsumae (Matsumae, Hokkaido), overland and without his ship. Laxman refused, and ultimately was allowed to sail, with Japanese naval escort, to the port of Hakodate; from there, 450 Russians and Japanese would march to Matsumae Castle. History Nnewi has an oral history tradition ) is believed to have played a great role


popular fiction

Hokuriku English-Japanese School, run by Christian missionaries. Eccentric and superstitious, Kyōka developed a reputation for writing about the grotesque and the fantastic. " is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


character+education

-contained "pleasure quarters" offering all manner of entertainments. Within, a courtesan’s birth rank held no distinction, which was fortunate considering many of the courtesans originated as the daughters of impoverished families who were sold into this lifestyle as indentured servants. Hickey 26–27 Instead, they were categorized based on their beauty, character, education, and artistic ability. For his services, Jan Joosten was granted a house in Edo (now


prominent school

and the middle class. Art was no longer reserved for the elite class, now it belonged to whoever could afford it. The Shogun of Edo and the Kyoto court continued to support the Tosa school as well as the other prominent school of the time, such as the Kano school. is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


writing publishing

in the Edo period, and Asano Naganori was a clear example. Middle Years: Neo-Confucianism and Kimon After his first publication, Ansai spent the remaining thirty-five years of his life writing, publishing, editing, annotating, and punctuating Confucian and Shinto texts (that accumulated to over two thousand pages). Ooms, p.201 The decade following Tosa (1647–1657), Ansai lived, studied, and taught in Kyoto. There, he edited and published a great number


architecture based

the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


original place

: 薬 (wikt:薬)研 (wikt:研)堀 (wikt:堀), from the name of the original place of production). Most shichimi sold today come from one of three kinds, sold near temples: sold near Zenkō-ji. ''Ukiyo'', meaning "floating world", refers to the impetuous young culture that bloomed in the urban centers of Edo (modern-day Tokyo


high commercial

market. Nnewi, Ichi and Oraifite made up the Anaedo state. Anaedo communities have common ancestries, beliefs and traditional value systems. Nnewi is a major trading and manufacturing centre in Nigeria. Due to its high commercial activities, the city has attracted millions of migrants from other states (States of Nigeria) and countries. In the field of entertainment and traditional festivities, Afiaolu (New yam festival (New Yam Festival of the Igbo)) and Ikwuaru are among traditional festivals held by Nnewi. Others Mentioned in passing in the stories are ''Edobase'' (old Tokyo), ''Greenland Base'', Antioch (as an underground way station in 1099 CE (Common Era)), ''London Station'' etc. In the novel ''In The Garden of Iden'', Joseph, Mendoza and the rest of the team ride a Company-built subway (subway (rail)) system which "connects all parts of England" during the Tudor period. The ride is safe but uncomfortable, the carriages being small and boxlike. The maximum speed is about that of a fast stagecoach, but without the risk of being robbed, or in the case of cyborgs pretending to be Spaniards, attacked by enraged mobs. The method of propulsion is not revealed. Japanese seppuku falls into this category. The culture of Bushido practiced by the samurai expected them to ritually kill themselves if found disloyal, sparing a daimyo or shogun the indignity of executing a follower. This was especially the case in the Edo period, and Asano Naganori was a clear example. Middle Years: Neo-Confucianism and Kimon After his first publication, Ansai spent the remaining thirty-five years of his life writing, publishing, editing, annotating, and punctuating Confucian and Shinto texts (that accumulated to over two thousand pages). Ooms, p.201 The decade following Tosa (1647–1657), Ansai lived, studied, and taught in Kyoto. There, he edited and published a great number of texts (mostly commentaries on the works of Chu Hsi). Ansai also frequently went to Edo, to give lecturers on Neo-Confucianism in front of a large numbers of daimyos. Tsuji, Tatsuya. ''The Cambridge History of Modern Japan, Volume 4, Early Modern Japan.'' Trans. by Harold Bolitho. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991, p.419 In 1655, he established a private school in Kyoto, began his first lecture cycle in the spring of the same year, and finished it at the end of 1656. thumb right Uesugi Harunori (Image:上杉鷹山.jpg) is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


service record

of a thousand warriors." Service record ''Shōhei Maru'' took longer to complete than was anticipated, and was commissioned on December 12, 1854, by which time the ''Hōō Maru'' (Japanese warship Hōō Maru) was completed by the Uraga ''bugyō'' (Uraga, Kanagawa) in July 1854. In order to distinguish the vessel from foreign vessels of similar design, ''Shōhei Maru'' flew a Rising Sun Flag. ''Shōhei Maru'' was transferred to Edo in February 1855 and commissioned into the Tokugawa


temple history

(1604–51) to become the first abbot of Tokai-ji Temple in Edo, which was constructed especially for the Tokugawa family. Takuan Sōhō died in Edo (present-day Tokyo) in December of 1645. At the moment before his death, Takuan painted the Chinese character 夢 ("dream"), laid down his brush and died. His tomb is located in the Shinagawa area of Tokyo at Oyama Cemetery of Tokaiji Temple. History The city is known locally as

temple. History Shimada (Kanaya) began as an outlying fortification to Kakegawa Castle erected by Yamauchi Kazutoyo in the Sengoku period to control the crossing of the Ōi River. In the Edo period, Kanaya-juku and Shimada-juku developed as post town (shukuba)s on the Tōkaidō (Tōkaidō (road)) highway connecting Edo with Kyoto. The area was mostly ''tenryō'' territory under direct control of the Tokugawa shogunate with a ''daikansho'' based

Edo

, also romanized (Romanization of Japanese) as '''Yedo''' or '''Yeddo''', is the former name (Geographical renaming) of Tokyo. US Department of State. (1906). ''A digest of international law as embodied in diplomatic discussions, treaties and other international agreements'' (John Bassett Moore, ed.), Vol. 5, p. 759; excerpt, "The Mikado, on assuming the exercise of power at Yedo, changed the name of the city to Tokio". It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world (ukiyo)". Sansom, George. ''A History of Japan: 1615–1867'', p. 114.

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