Edo

What is Edo known for?


record book

'' in Dejima noted in his official record book that "people are considering it to be a great and extraordinary heavenly portent." Screech, pp. 152-154, 249-250 thumb right Statue of a '' kitsune (Image:Inuyama inari 1.jpg)'' adorned with a red


ancient tradition

cities like Edo and Osaka. It was not precisely a new form; satirical waka was a style known since ancient times. But it was in the Edo period that this aspect of waka developed and reached an artistic peak. Still, most waka poets kept to ancient tradition or made those reformation another stereotype, and waka was not a vibrant genre in general at the end of this period. * February 23 – In England, the Humble Petition and Advice offers Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell


short social

on the Katsura River at Arashiyama In Japanese, the city has been called '''Kyō''' ( ). Lowe, John. (2000). ''Old Kyoto: A short Social History,'' p. x. After Edo was renamed Tokyo (meaning "Eastern Capital") in 1868, Kyoto was known


realistic style

of the ''kizewamono'' (生世話物) form, a form defined by plays of a more realistic style than the earlier ''sewamono'' form, and set in Tsuruya and Mokuami's contemporary 19th century Edo, rather than Osaka. In 1843, he became the standing playwright for the Kawarazaki-za theatre, and began working with kabuki star Ichikawa Kodanji IV in 1854, producing ''kizewamono'' pieces. Most of Mokuami's works are in this form, and were written specifically for the star actors of the time, such as Onoe Kikugorō V and Ichikawa Kodanji IV. Many of his plays, such as the famous ''Benten Kozō'', featured thieves and robbers, also known as ''shiranami'' (white waves), who he represented somewhat sympathetically, as low-class heroes, or as tragic figures. The Edo Shogunate's edicts banning Christianity were still on the books, however, and thus the religion continued to be persecuted up to 1867, the last year of its rule. Robert Bruce Van Valkenburgh, the American minister-resident in Japan, privately complained of this persecution to the Nagasaki magistrates, though little action was taken to stop it. The succeeding Meiji government initially continued in this vein and several thousand people were exiled (Urakami Yoban Kuzure). After Europe and the U.S. began to vocally criticize the persecution, the Japanese government realized that it needed to lift the ban in order to attain its interests. In 1873 the ban was lifted. Numerous exiles returned and began construction of the Urakami Cathedral, which was completed in 1895. As a cultural phenomenon, the literature of this period records concerted attempts to distill the aggregate characteristics of the inhabitants of Edo (''Edokko'') into a generalized thumbnail description. These traits (''Edokko katagi'') were put into use to draw a contrast between Edokko and those who didn't have this "sophisticated" gloss -— those not from the city, as in merchants from the Kyoto-Osaka (Kansai) region or samurai from distant provinces. Sometimes ''Edokko katagi'' was presented with pride; and it was used mockingly. Nara, Hiroshi. (2004). ''The Structure of Detachment: the Aesthetic Vision of Kuki Shūzō with a translation of "Iki no kōzō,"'' p. 1. * '''1695''' (''Genroku 8, 8th month''): Minting begun of ''Genroku'' coinage. The shogunate placed the Japanese character ''gen'' (元) on the obverse of copper coins, the same character used today in China for the yuan (Chinese yuan). There is no connection between those uses, however. * '''1695''' (''Genroku 8, 11th month''): First kennel is established for stray dogs in Edo. In this context, Tokugawa Tsunayoshi comes to be nicknamed "the Dog Shogun" thumb left Map of Kyoto and immediate vicinity, circa 1696. Like most early Japanese maps, this map does not have a firm directional orientation, rather all text radiates out from the center. (File:1696 Genroku 9 (early Edo) Japanese Map of Kyoto, Japan - Geographicus - Kyoto-genroku9-1696.jpg) Events of the ''Tenna'' era * '''1681''' (''Tenna 1''): In Edo, the investiture of Tokugawa Tsunayoshi as the fifth shogun of the Edo bakufu (Tokugawa shogunate). Titsingh, p. 414. * '''February 5, 1681''' (''Tenna 1, 28th day of the 12th month'') : The Great ''Tenna'' Fire in Edo. Titsingh, p. 415. * '''1655''' (''Meireki 1''): The ex-Emperor went for the first time to Shugakuin Rikyū. Ponsonby-Fane, Richard. (1956). ''Kyoto: the Old Capital, 794-1869'', p. 318. * '''March 2–3, 1657''' (''Meireki 3, 18th-19th days of the 1st month'') : The city of Edo was devastated by a violent fire (Great Fire of Meireki). is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


family school

on the social and economic status of the individual. Royal palaces in Yorubaland and the Kingdom of Benin possessed hundreds of impluvia sometimes floored with elaborate pavements made of potsherds and quartz pebbles arranged in decorative patterns. In 1654, Mitsuoki restored fortunes back to the family school when he earned the title of the edokoro azukari, which means “head of the court painting (court painter) bureau”. Now the Tosa school was back into the highlight of the court. The school


national+studies

10.2307 132115 The study of Western sciences, known as ''rangaku'', continued through contact with the Dutch enclave at Dejima in Nagasaki. The Edo period also gave rise to ''kokugaku'' ("national studies"), the study of Japan by the Japanese. is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


century originating

half of the 17th century, originating with the single-color works of Hishikawa Moronobu in the 1670s. At first, only India ink was used, then some prints were manually colored with a brush, but in the 18th century Suzuki Harunobu developed the technique of polychrome printing to produce ''nishiki-e''. is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


popular story

in and around Edo. A popular story says that in 1596 he was responsible for death of Hattori Hanzō, a famous ninja in the service of Tokugawa Ieyasu, who had tracked him down in the Inland Sea (Seto Inland Sea) but Kotarō has succeeded in luring him into a small channel, where a tide trapped the Tokugawa gunboats and his men then set fire to the channel with oil. Kotarō was eventually caught by the shogunate's special law-enforcement force, guided by his rival and a former Takeda ninja Kosaka Jinnai (高坂甚内), and executed through beheading (Decapitation) by an order of Ieyasu in 1603. Sūden oversaw the administration of Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples in the country alongside Itakura Katsushige, and was involved in a great many diplomatic affairs along with advisors Hayashi Razan and Honda Masazumi. Sūden made his home at the Konchi-in temple he founded in Sunpu, and founded another one by the same name in Edo in 1618. He was abbot of Nanzen-ji in Kyoto. Nussbaum, Louis Frédéric ''et al.'' (2005). ''Japan Encyclopedia,'' p. 381. is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


speaking traditional

the Jōkyō era. In 1702, he changed his name to ''Shibukawa Sukezaemon Shunkai'' and retired by 1711. Overview Generally speaking, traditional Japanese maps were quite diverse in style, depiction, and purpose, and were often oriented towards pragmatic use. It was less common for maps to serve literary or decorative purposes as they might in the West, instead being used for purposes such as the differentiation of rice fields on a feudal manor, or orientation within a temple complex


temple amp

and has several appearances in the anime. Expansion For over 600 years, Narita-san remained a remote, humble, provincial temple—until Tokugawa Ieyasu moved his capital to Edo in 1603. Ieyasu himself credited its abbot with converting him to Buddhism, and assigned the local Sakura Domain daimyo to be responsible for its upkeep. The military and political success associated with the temple may also have

Edo

, also romanized (Romanization of Japanese) as '''Yedo''' or '''Yeddo''', is the former name (Geographical renaming) of Tokyo. US Department of State. (1906). ''A digest of international law as embodied in diplomatic discussions, treaties and other international agreements'' (John Bassett Moore, ed.), Vol. 5, p. 759; excerpt, "The Mikado, on assuming the exercise of power at Yedo, changed the name of the city to Tokio". It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world (ukiyo)". Sansom, George. ''A History of Japan: 1615–1867'', p. 114.

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