Edo

What is Edo known for?


art arts

in the arts (Japanese art). For the first time, urban populations had the means and leisure time to support a new mass culture. Their search for enjoyment became known as ''ukiyo'' (the floating world), an ideal world of fashion and popular entertainment. Professional female entertainers (''geisha''), music, popular stories, ''Kabuki'' and ''bunraku'' (puppet theater), poetry (Japanese poetry), a rich literature (Japanese literature), and art, exemplified by beautiful woodblock prints (known as ''ukiyo-e''), were all part of this flowering of culture. Literature also flourished with the talented examples of the playwright Chikamatsu Monzaemon (1653 – 1724) and the haiku poet, essayist, and travel writer Matsuo Bashō (1644 – 94). In early 1869, the national capital was transferred from Kyoto to Edo, which was renamed Tokyo (Eastern Capital). In 1998, Katō returns to stir up another earthquake under Tokyo by arousing the water dragon, Ryūjin. It is revealed here that Katō is actually another incarnation of the raging spirit of Taira no Masakado himself who (in the story) had cursed the city of Edo just before his death. Just as Masakado sought to overthrow the current Japanese government, so does Katō seek to overthrow the Imperial authority by eliminating the capital Tokyo. The Kuchisake-onna legend began in the Edo period, with the woman initially covering her face with her kimono. History Archaeologists have found numerous Kofun period remains at numerous locations in what is now Saiwai-ku, indicating a long period of human settlement. Under the Nara period Ritsuryō system, it became part of Tachibana District Musashi Province. In the Edo period, it was administered as ''tenryō'' territory controlled directly by the Tokugawa shogunate, but administered through various ''hatamoto'', and was the center of a prosperous farming area adjacent to Kawasaki-juku, a post station (shukuba) on the Tokaido (Tokaido (road)) highway connecting Edo with Kyoto. After the Meiji Restoration, the area urbanized due to its proximity to Kawasaki Station on the Tokaido Main Line. Saiwai Village within Tachibana District in the new Kanagawa Prefecture was created on April 1, 1889 through the merger of eight smaller hamlets. In the early twentieth century, the area was dominated by factories; notably Meiji Sugar and Toshiba. The area was largely destroyed by the Great Kanto earthquake of 1923, but was soon rebuilt. The area was annexed by the neighboring city of Kawasaki in two stages in 1927 and in 1937. The area was heavily damaged by American bombing during World War II. birth_date is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


temple amp

and has several appearances in the anime. Expansion For over 600 years, Narita-san remained a remote, humble, provincial temple—until Tokugawa Ieyasu moved his capital to Edo in 1603. Ieyasu himself credited its abbot with converting him to Buddhism, and assigned the local Sakura Domain daimyo to be responsible for its upkeep. The military and political success associated with the temple may also have


style popular

translator , and literary critic. Born '''Hasegawa Tatsunosuke''' (長谷川 辰之助) in Edo (now Tokyo), Futabatei's works are in the realist (Literary realism) style popular in the mid- to late-19th century. His work ''Ukigumo'' (''Floating Clouds (The Drifting Cloud)'', 1887) is widely hailed as Japan's first modern novel. Early life Uchimura was born in Edo, and exhibited a talent for languages from a very early age; he started to study the English language at the age of 11. In 1877, he gained admission to the Sapporo Agricultural College (present-day Hokkaido University), where English was the main language of instruction. Career Shortly after Shūzō's return to Japan, he wrote and published his masterpiece, ''The Structure of "Iki"'' (1930). In this work he undertakes to make a phenomenological analysis of ‘iki (iki (aesthetic ideal))’, a variety of chic culture current among the fashionable set in Edo in the Tokugawa period, and asserted that it constituted one of the essential values of Japanese culture. birth_date is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


period numerous

: www.kokudo.or.jp new cities sub chubu 22.htm History The area around present-day Okazaki has been inhabited for many thousands of years. Archaeologists have found remains from the Japanese Paleolithic period. Numerous remains from the Jomon period, and especially from the Yayoi (Yayoi period) and Kofun periods have also been found, including many kofun burial mounds. During the Sengoku period, the area was controlled by the Matsudaira clan, a branch of which


rich commercial

capital in modern Fuchu, Tokyo and its provincial temple in what is now Kokubunji, Tokyo. By the Sengoku period, the main city was Edo, which became the dominant city of eastern Japan. Edo Castle was the headquarters of Tokugawa Ieyasu before the Battle of Sekigahara and became the dominant city of Japan during the Edo period, being renamed Tokyo during the Meiji Restoration. In the Edo period Tochigi was a rich commercial city. People used the Uzuma


nearby presence

of Edo castle) from the bridge next to Ichigaya Station Hosei has three main campuses, which it calls Ichigaya, Koganei, and Tama. The Ichigaya campus is halfway between Ichigaya (Ichigaya Station) and Iidabashi (Iidabashi Station) stations in central Tokyo; its 26-story Boissonade Tower, completed in 2000, can be seen from either station. The campus has a city flavour but is still somewhat isolated from central Tokyo; the nearby presence of Yasukuni Shrine also contributes. He


starting location

. As the starting point for the five routes (Edo Five Routes) of the Edo period, Nihonbashi provided easy access to many parts throughout ancient Japan. *'''Tōkaidō (Tōkaidō (road))''' (connecting Edo to Kyoto, staying near the coast) :'''Nihonbashi''' ''(starting location)'' - Shinagawa-juku thumb Old water mill (File:Magome2.jpg) was the forty-third of the sixty-nine stations (69 Stations of the Nakasendō) of the Nakasendō, an ancient


quot offering

-contained "pleasure quarters" offering all manner of entertainments. Within, a courtesan’s birth rank held no distinction, which was fortunate considering many of the courtesans originated as the daughters of impoverished families who were sold into this lifestyle as indentured servants. Hickey 26–27 Instead, they were categorized based on their beauty, character, education, and artistic ability. For his services, Jan Joosten was granted a house in Edo (now


academic+painting

in the village of Hodamura, Awa Province (Awa Province (Chiba)), near Edo Bay in present-day Kyonan (Kyonan, Chiba), Chiba Prefecture. After moving to Edo, Moronobu, who had learned his father's craft, studied both Tosa (Tosa school) and Kanō (Kanō school)-style painting. He thus had a solid grounding in both decorative crafts and academic painting, which served him well when he then turned to ukiyo-e, which he studied with his mentor, the Kambun Master. Yasuda Zenjirō


century originating

half of the 17th century, originating with the single-color works of Hishikawa Moronobu in the 1670s. At first, only India ink was used, then some prints were manually colored with a brush, but in the 18th century Suzuki Harunobu developed the technique of polychrome printing to produce ''nishiki-e''. is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.

Edo

, also romanized (Romanization of Japanese) as '''Yedo''' or '''Yeddo''', is the former name (Geographical renaming) of Tokyo. US Department of State. (1906). ''A digest of international law as embodied in diplomatic discussions, treaties and other international agreements'' (John Bassett Moore, ed.), Vol. 5, p. 759; excerpt, "The Mikado, on assuming the exercise of power at Yedo, changed the name of the city to Tokio". It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world (ukiyo)". Sansom, George. ''A History of Japan: 1615–1867'', p. 114.

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