Edo

What is Edo known for?


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OF DEATH December 5, 1708 The area of modern Hōya was an agricultural region and agricultural products transshipment center for Edo in the premodern period, and was part of ancient Musashi Province. After the Meiji Restoration it came under the jurisdiction of the short-lived prefectures of Shinagawa (1868), Irima (1871), Kumagaya (1873) and Saitama (Saitama Prefecture) (1876). thumb Present plan of Nijō Castle (click for detailed view) (Image:Nijo Castle plan.svg) In 1601


period based

by the government in Edo and administered through ''hatamoto'' class appointed administrators. The village of “Tokugawa”, from which Tokugawa Ieyasu took his clan name, was located within what is now the city of Toyota. History Nishio was the home territory for the Sakai clan during the Sengoku period, based at Nishio Castle. The area eventually came under the control of the Tokugawa clan, and during the Edo period, most of the area was ruled by Nishio Domain


work portraits

, the son of a poor samurai in Etchu Province, moved to Edo at the age of 17 and began working in a money changing house. In 1863, he started providing tax-farming services to the Tokugawa Shogunate. After the Meiji Restoration, he provided the same


elegant paintings

), Japan nationality Japanese (Japanese people) Tōhaku's most noted contemporary was Kanō Eitoku who often competed with Tōhaku for the patronage of Toyotomi Hideyoshi. After Eitoku's death in 1590, Tōhaku stood alone as the greatest living master of his time. Becoming an official painter for Hideyoshi, producing some of his greatest and most elegant paintings. He and his atelier produced the wall and screen paintings in Shounji temple commissioned by Toyotomi Hideyoshi in 1593. The paintings moved to Chishaku-in Temple, Kyoto and survived. At the age of 67, Tōhaku was summoned to Edo and granted the priestly title of hōgen by the Shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu. Webb, Glenn T. "Hasegawa Tohaku." Kodansha Encyclopedia of Japan. 1st ed. 1983. There he stayed for the remainder of his life. DATE OF DEATH March 19, 1610 PLACE OF DEATH Edo (Tokyo), Japan Back in Edo, Ieyasu received news of the situation in Kansai and decided to deploy his forces. He had some former Toyotomi daimyo engage with the western forces while he split his troops and marched west on the Tōkaidō (Tōkaidō (road)) towards Osaka Castle. Meteoric rise In 1840 Shusaku left Edo and returned to his home for a period of over a year. In the following years, he made steady progress up the ranks, reaching 4 dan in 1844, after which he again returned home for a prolonged period. In April–May 1846, returning to Edo, he played against Gennan Inseki, arguably the strongest player of that time. Shusaku played with a handicap of two stones, but Gennan found that Shusaku was too strong, so he called off the game. A new game was started with Shusaku just playing black, the ear reddening game. Gennan played a new joseki (opening variation in a corner), and Shusaku erred in responding. He fought back hard, but still by the time of the middlegame, all the people watching the game thought Gennan was winning, except for one, a doctor. He admitted that he was not skilled in go, but noticed that Gennan's ears became red after a certain move by Shusaku, a sign that Gennan was surprised. In the end, Shusaku won the game by two points. ''Susquehanna'' (USS Susquehanna (1847)) at Uraga Harbor near Edo (modern Tokyo) on July 8, 1853. His actions at this crucial juncture were informed by a careful study of Japan's previous contacts with Western ships and what could be known about the Japanese hierarchical culture. He was met by representatives of the Tokugawa Shogunate who told him to proceed to Nagasaki (Nagasaki, Nagasaki), where there was limited trade with the Netherlands and which was the only Japanese port open to foreigners at that time (see Sakoku). left thumb Japanese coastal wooden cannon (File:Japanese coastal wooden cannon 1853 1854.jpg) built by the Daimyos at the Bakufu's order for Commodore Perry's arrival. 1853-54. As he arrived, Perry ordered his ships to steam past Japanese lines towards the capital of Edo, and position their guns towards the town of Uraga. ''The Perry mission to Japan, 1853 - 1854'' by William Gerald Beasley, Aaron Haight Palmer, Henry F. Graff, Yashi Shōzan, Ernest Mason Satow, Shuziro Watanabe p.153''ff'' Perry refused to abide to demands to leave. He then demanded permission to present a letter from President Millard Fillmore, and threatened to use force if the Japanese boats around the American squadron did not disperse. Adams's memory is preserved in the naming of a town in Edo (modern Tokyo), Anjin-chō (in modern-day Nihonbashi), where he had a house, and by an annual celebration on June 15 in his honour. History Musashi had its ancient capital in modern Fuchu, Tokyo and its provincial temple in what is now Kokubunji, Tokyo. By the Sengoku period, the main city was Edo, which became the dominant city of eastern Japan. Edo Castle was the headquarters of Tokugawa Ieyasu before the Battle of Sekigahara and became the dominant city of Japan during the Edo period, being renamed Tokyo during the Meiji Restoration. In the Edo period Tochigi was a rich commercial city. People used the Uzuma Canal that flows through the city center to go to Edo (as Tokyo was known at the time). Envoys using the ''Reiheishi Way'' sent from the Imperial Court going to the shrines and temples of Nikko stayed at the lodging area in the city. Another name for Tochigi is ''Koedo'' or Little Edo. * '''1695''' (''Genroku 8, 11th month''): First kennel is established for stray dogs in Edo. In this context, Tokugawa Tsunayoshi comes to be nicknamed the is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


famous story

, Caritas University, Enugu, University of Nigeria, Nsukka The Mujina of the Akasaka Road The most famous story recollection of the Noppera-bō comes from Lafcadio Hearn's book ''Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things''. The story of a man who travelled along the Akasaka (Akasaka, Tokyo) road to Edo, he came across a young woman in a remote location near Kunizaka hill, crying and forlorn. After attempting to console the young woman and offer assistance, she turned to face him, startling him with the blank countenance of a faceless ghost. Frightened, the man proceeded down the road for some time, until he came across a soba vendor. Stopping to relax, the man told the vendor of his tale, only to recoil in horror as the soba vendor stroked his face, becoming a noppera-bō himself. From 862 until 1683, the Japanese calendar was arranged so that the full moon fell on the 13th day of each month. In 1684, however, the calendar was altered so that the new moon fell on the first day of each month, moving the full moon two days later, to the 15th day of the month. While some people in Edo (present-day Tokyo) shifted their Tsukimi activities to the 15th day of the month, others continued to observe the festival on the 13th day. Furthermore, there were various regional observances in some parts of Japan on the 17th day of the month, as well as Buddhist observances on the 23rd or the 26th day, all of which were used as pretexts for often late-night parties during the autumn throughout the Edo period. This custom was brought to a swift end during the Meiji period. is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


artistic ability

-contained "pleasure quarters" offering all manner of entertainments. Within, a courtesan’s birth rank held no distinction, which was fortunate considering many of the courtesans originated as the daughters of impoverished families who were sold into this lifestyle as indentured servants. Hickey 26–27 Instead, they were categorized based on their beauty, character, education, and artistic ability. For his services, Jan Joosten was granted a house in Edo (now


including cultural

of historical materials concerning the Edo (Yedo) period (from the 17th to the 19th century). The Department of Old Documents and Diaries is devoted to the study of, obviously, old documents and diaries (diary). Finally, the Department of Special Materials is devoted to the study of various special materials including cultural properties, Japanese old-style signatures, historical geography, and overseas materials relating to Japan. The most important such method is the promotion


artistic community

became well-renowned in the social circles and artistic community of Kyoto. Two years into his marriage, Taiga set off on a series of journeys, another major element of the ''bunjin'' lifestyle. He sought to commune with nature, to glean inspiration for his art, and most of all, to simply become a more cultured and experienced individual. After travels through Kanazawa (Kanazawa, Ishikawa), Nikkō, and Mt. Fuji, Taiga stayed for a time in Edo. There, he produced paintings


art arts

in the arts (Japanese art). For the first time, urban populations had the means and leisure time to support a new mass culture. Their search for enjoyment became known as ''ukiyo'' (the floating world), an ideal world of fashion and popular entertainment. Professional female entertainers (''geisha''), music, popular stories, ''Kabuki'' and ''bunraku'' (puppet theater), poetry (Japanese poetry), a rich literature (Japanese literature), and art, exemplified by beautiful woodblock prints (known as ''ukiyo-e''), were all part of this flowering of culture. Literature also flourished with the talented examples of the playwright Chikamatsu Monzaemon (1653 – 1724) and the haiku poet, essayist, and travel writer Matsuo Bashō (1644 – 94). In early 1869, the national capital was transferred from Kyoto to Edo, which was renamed Tokyo (Eastern Capital). In 1998, Katō returns to stir up another earthquake under Tokyo by arousing the water dragon, Ryūjin. It is revealed here that Katō is actually another incarnation of the raging spirit of Taira no Masakado himself who (in the story) had cursed the city of Edo just before his death. Just as Masakado sought to overthrow the current Japanese government, so does Katō seek to overthrow the Imperial authority by eliminating the capital Tokyo. The Kuchisake-onna legend began in the Edo period, with the woman initially covering her face with her kimono. History Archaeologists have found numerous Kofun period remains at numerous locations in what is now Saiwai-ku, indicating a long period of human settlement. Under the Nara period Ritsuryō system, it became part of Tachibana District Musashi Province. In the Edo period, it was administered as ''tenryō'' territory controlled directly by the Tokugawa shogunate, but administered through various ''hatamoto'', and was the center of a prosperous farming area adjacent to Kawasaki-juku, a post station (shukuba) on the Tokaido (Tokaido (road)) highway connecting Edo with Kyoto. After the Meiji Restoration, the area urbanized due to its proximity to Kawasaki Station on the Tokaido Main Line. Saiwai Village within Tachibana District in the new Kanagawa Prefecture was created on April 1, 1889 through the merger of eight smaller hamlets. In the early twentieth century, the area was dominated by factories; notably Meiji Sugar and Toshiba. The area was largely destroyed by the Great Kanto earthquake of 1923, but was soon rebuilt. The area was annexed by the neighboring city of Kawasaki in two stages in 1927 and in 1937. The area was heavily damaged by American bombing during World War II. birth_date is a Buddhist (Buddhism) temple in Katsushika (Katsushika, Tokyo), Tokyo, near the Yamamoto House and Mizumoto City Park. This temple is famous for the "Bound Jizo (Ksitigarbha)" discussed in the ''Case of the Bound Jizo'' of Ōoka Tadasuke, a famous judge in Edo (Tokyo) during the Edo period. The next year, in 1709, he was taken to Edo and questioned directly by Japanese politician and Confucian scholar Arai Hakuseki. Hakuseki was impressed by Sidotti's demeanor and his level of scholarship, and developed a great deal of respect for him. The feeling was mutual, and Sidotti grew to trust Arai. Here, for the first time since the beginning of ''sakoku'' in the previous century, was a meeting between two great scholars from the civilizations of Japan and western Europe. Among other things, Sidotti explained to Hakuseki that, contrary to what the Japanese believed at that time, Western missionaries were not the vanguards of Western armies. * '''Nagamochi Kuruma-dansu''' : These coffers on wheels are the oldest documented example of Japanese mobile cabinetry. Diaries from a trade delegation to Edo from the Dutch East India (Dutch East India Company) settlement on Dejima Island, Nagasaki (Dejima ) in March 1657, refer to "big chests on four wheels" that so blocked the roads, people could not escape. What Zacharias Wagenaer and his mission by chance witnessed, has become known as the Great Fire of Meireki in which 107,000 people perished. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 21-23, 42-43, 48. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York Vermeulen, Ton & van der Velde, Paul (1986). The Deshima Dagregisters. Publisher: Leiden Centre for the History of European Expansion, Leiden * '''Hikone Mizuya-dansu''' : Although mizuya (kitchen chests) both of a single section and chest on chest configuration have been crafted to fit into or adjacent to home kitchen alcoves since at least the mid Edo Period, the mizuya produced in the town of Hikone (Hikone, Shiga) on Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture deserve particular note. Though copied from Nagoya to Kyoto, the Hikone design, as a uniting of house storage needs and traditional architecture based upon the shaku (Shaku (unit)) measurement as standardized in 1891 is to be praised. Using mortise and tenon construction with Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) for primary framing, craftsmen cleverly lightened the visual mass of the case by using kijiro nuri (translucent lacquered) finishing for the door and drawer face woods. For the hardware, copper rather than iron was preferred. Heineken, Ty & Kiyoko (1981). Tansu: Traditional Japanese Cabinetry. Pages: 145, 157. Publisher: Weatherhill Inc., New York *Santo (List of Firefly planets and moons), a planet on the ''Firefly'' science fiction franchise *''santo'', the "three capitals" of Japan under the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo period: the cities of Edo, Kyōto and Ōsaka History Hojōjutsu (捕縄術) or Nawajutsu, (縄術) is the traditional Japanese martial skill of restraining a person using cord or rope (''Hojō''). It found use on both on and off the battlefield in up to 125 individual martial arts schools. It was used in particular by the various police-forces (police) of the Edo-period and remains in use to this day with the Tokyo police force. In the warring-era (1467-1615) it was not uncommon for warriors carrying a rope for use as a tool or as a restraint for prisoners of war when on campaign. The rope is to be used on an opponent after he or she has been subdued using restraining methods (''torite'') such as the methods found in the ''Ikkaku-ryū juttejutsu'' system. In 1694, Yasubei came to the aid of his dojo mate and pledged uncle in a duel at Takadanobaba in Edo, killing three opponents. He received acclaim for his role, and Horibe Yahei of the Akō Domain asked Yasubei to marry his daughter and become the heir to Yahei's family. Yahei was so impressed with Yasubei that he pleaded to his liege, Asano Naganori, to allow Yasubei to keep his Nakayama surname while marrying into the Horibe family. Yasubei eventually took on the Horibe surname and became a successful retainer of the Akō Domain.


period major

is that of a beautiful older woman taking care of a young man. were ancient roads in Japan dating from the Edo period. Major examples include the Edo Five Routes, all of which started at Edo (modern-day Tokyo). Minor examples include sub-routes such as the Hokuriku Kaidō and the Nagasaki Kaidō. The Nihonbashi bridge first became famous during the 17th century, when it was the eastern terminus of the Nakasendō and the Tōkaidō (road

Edo

, also romanized (Romanization of Japanese) as '''Yedo''' or '''Yeddo''', is the former name (Geographical renaming) of Tokyo. US Department of State. (1906). ''A digest of international law as embodied in diplomatic discussions, treaties and other international agreements'' (John Bassett Moore, ed.), Vol. 5, p. 759; excerpt, "The Mikado, on assuming the exercise of power at Yedo, changed the name of the city to Tokio". It was the seat of power for the Tokugawa shogunate, which ruled Japan from 1603 to 1868. During this period, it grew to become one of the largest cities in the world and home to an urban culture centered on the notion of a "floating world (ukiyo)". Sansom, George. ''A History of Japan: 1615–1867'', p. 114.

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