Eastern Wu

What is Eastern Wu known for?


period

Zitong . For the later Ten Kingdoms empires, see Wuyue and Yang Wu. For the present-day university of the same name, see Soochow University (Soochow University (Taiwan)). '''Wu''' (229–280), commonly known as '''Eastern Wu''' or '''Sun Wu''', was one of the three major states that competed for supremacy over China in the Three Kingdoms period (220–280). Its name was derived from the place it was based in — the Jiangnan (Yangtze River Delta) region, which

was also historically known as "Wu (Wu (region))". It was referred to as "Eastern Wu" or "Sun Wu" by historians to distinguish it from other Chinese historical states with similar names which were also located in that region, such as the Wu state (Wu (state)) in the Spring and Autumn Period and the Wuyue kingdom in the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It was called "Eastern Wu" because it occupied most of eastern China in the Three

Kingdoms period, and "Sun Wu" because the family name of its rulers was "Sun (Sun (surname))". During its existence, Wu's capital was at Jianye (Jiankang) (present-day Nanjing, Jiangsu), but at times it was also at Wuchang ( . History thumb 242px A jar made in Eastern Wu dating to the Three Kingdoms (File:WuJar.jpg) period. Beginnings


quick wit

). Following this, Sun's fortress at Yiling was then surrounded by the enemy. Sun defended the fortress until reinforcements arrived. '''Xue Zong''' (died 243), style name (Chinese style name) '''Jingwen''' (敬文), was an official of Eastern Wu during the Three Kingdoms era of China. He was known for his quick wit. On one occasion, when the Shu Han envoy Zhang Feng (張奉) made fun of the name of his colleague Kan Ze during a feast, he gained somewhat


made including

to grant her family excessive wealth or titles, setting an example for the rest of Cao Wei's history. One incident that in which she engaged herself happened in 226, when Cao Pi wanted to execute Cao Cao's cousin Cao Hong due to grudges that they had previously. She, remembering the contributions that Cao Hong madeincluding one occasion when he personally saved Cao Cao's life—rebuked Cao Pi sufficiently that he spared Cao Hong's life, although Cao Hong's offices and titles were still


quot compositions

the poetry of Zhang Heng for its "curbing extravagant diction and aiming at simplicity", in regards to perceived tranquility and rectitude correlating with the simple but effective language of the poet. Yim-tze (1989), 63. Tao wrote that both Zhang Heng and Cai Yong "avoided inflated language, aiming chiefly at simplicity", and adding that their "compositions begin by giving free expression to their fancies but end on a note of quiet, serving admirably to restrain undisciplined and passionate nature". Hightower (1954), 169–170. * Kong Rong, governor of Beihai (d. 208) * Zhang Hong, minister for Eastern Wu during the Three Kingdoms (d. 212) * Zhang Xun (Zhang Xun (Three Kingdoms)) (d. 199) * Zhang Zhao, trusted adviser of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 236) * Zhu Zhi, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 224) * Zhang Zhao, trusted adviser of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 236) * Zhu Zhi, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 224) * Marcus Aurelius Numerian (Numerian), Roman Emperor * Sun Hao, last emperor of the Kingdom of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 242) * Xin Xianying, daughter of Xin Pi (b. 205) * Cao Ang, eldest son of Cao Cao (d. 197) * Gan Ning, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 218) * Sun Ce, elder brother of founder of the Wu Kingdom, Sun Quan (d. 200) * Pope Anterus * Zhang Zhao, minister of Eastern Wu (b. 156) * Dong Zhao (Dong Zhao (Three Kingdoms)), minister of Han Dynasty (b. 156) * Liu Bei, founder of the Shu Kingdom of China (d. 223) * Lu Dai, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 256) The Three Kingdoms Period (Three Kingdoms) consisted of the kingdom of Wei (Cao Wei), Shu (Shu Han), and Wu (Eastern Wu). It began when the ruler of Wei, Cao Cao, was defeated by Liu Bei and Sun Quan at the Battle of Red Cliffs. After Cao Cao's death in AD 220, his son Cao Pi became emperor of Wei. Liu Bei and Sun Quan declared themselves emperor of Shu and Wu respectively. Many famous personages in Chinese history were born during this period, including Hua Tuo and the great military strategist Zhuge Liang. Buddhism, which was introduced during the Han Dynasty, also became popular in this period. Two years after Wei conquered Shu (Conquest of Shu by Wei) in AD 263, Sima Yan, Wei's Imperial Chancellor, overthrew Wei and started the Western Jin Dynasty (Jin Dynasty (265–420)). The conquest of Wu by the Western Jin Dynasty ended the Three Kingdoms period, and China was unified again. However, the Western Jin did not last long. Following the death of Sima Yan, the War of the Eight Princes began. This war weakened the Jin Dynasty, and it soon fell to the kingdom of Han Zhao. This ushered in the Sixteen Kingdoms. * Wang Ling (Wang Ling (Cao Wei)), general of Wei (Cao Wei) (d. 250) * Sun Shao, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 242) * Zhou Fang (Zhou Fang (Three Kingdoms)), general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 240) * Sun Shao, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 242) * Zhou Fang (Zhou Fang (Three Kingdoms)), general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 240) * Diophantus, Greek (Greece) mathematician (mathematics) * Cao Xun (b. 230) * Zhang Cheng, general of Eastern Wu (b. 178) * Trieu Thi Trinh, Vietnamese, female warrior (b. 225) * Zhu Ran, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 182) * Wu Can, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 187) * Zhu Ran, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 182) * Wu Can, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 187) * Wang Ping, general of Shu (Shu Han) Deaths * Gu Yong, minister of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 168) * Kan Ze, advisor of Wu (Eastern Wu) * Saloninus, Roman Emperor (d. 260) * Sun Hao, last emperor of the Kingdom of Wu (Eastern Wu) (d. 284) * Xue Zong, official of Wu (Eastern Wu) * Ling Tong, general of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 189) * Li Yan (Li Yan (Three Kingdoms)), general of the Shu Kingdom * Pan Zhang, general of Kingdom of Wu (Eastern Wu) (b. 177) * Wei Yan, Shu (Shu Han) general (executed by Ma Dai) (b. 175) was a military general of Eastern Wu during the late Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of Chinese history (History of China). Although an active general with high rank, he was known to desire wealth and treasure, and to dress himself in a gaudy fashion. It was said that he would kill wealthy officials or soldiers in order to confiscate their wealth for his own.


strong military

terrifying encounter with the ghost of Yu Ji (Gan Ji), a venerable magician whom he had falsely accused and executed in jealousy. However, his younger brother Sun Quan, who succeeds him, proves to be a capable and charismatic ruler. Sun, assisted by skilled advisors Zhou Yu and Zhang Zhao, inspires hidden talents such as Lu Su to join his service, and builds up a strong military force. During the Three Kingdoms period (220 – 280), the "cross-joint dome"

Cao Rui. He killed the Eastern Wu delegates but some of them fled to Goguryeo. Eastern Wu attempted to ally with Goguryeo to launch a pincer attack on Gongsun, but Goguryeo eventually sided with Cao Wei as well. Cao Rui's reign was viewed in many different ways throughout Chinese history. He was an emperor who was known to have been a strong military strategist and a good leader astute in commissioning capable officials. At the same time, he was personally a supporter of arts. However, he devoted much resources into building palaces and ancestral temples, and his reign saw the stalemate between his empire, Shu Han, and Eastern Wu become more entrenched. His building projects and his desire to have many concubines (who numbered in the thousands) greatly exhausted the imperial treasury. On his deathbed, he entrusted his son Cao Fang to the regency of Cao Shuang and Sima Yi -- a fatal mistake for his clan, as Cao Shuang monopolized power and governed incompetently, eventually drawing a violent reaction from Sima, who overthrew him in a coup d'etat and became in control of the Cao Wei government, eventually allowing his grandson Sima Yan to usurp the Wei throne. In 232, Gongsun Yuan's repeated communicated with and sales of horses to Eastern Wu angered Cao Rui, who ordered his generals Tian Yu and Wang Xiong (王雄) to attack Liaodong against Jiang Ji (蔣濟)'s advice; the attacks were not successful, although Tian was able to intercept the Eastern Wu horse-buying fleet and destroy it. After the incident, although Gongsun formally maintained vassalage to Cao Wei, the relationship was damaged. Deposal by Sima Shi In 252, Sima Shi led a campaign against Eastern Wu, whose founding emperor Sun Quan had recently died, and the current ruler Sun Liang was under Zhuge Ke's regency. Although Sima was defeated, he maintained himself well by publicly admitting his faults and promoting the generals who advised him against the campaign. In 253, Sima defeated Zhuge Ke in a major battle and established a reputation in the military. was a military general of Eastern Wu during the late Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of Chinese history (History of China). Although an active general with high rank, he was known to desire wealth and treasure, and to dress himself in a gaudy fashion. It was said that he would kill wealthy officials or soldiers in order to confiscate their wealth for his own.


commentary+history

;cm. was a military general of Eastern Wu during the late Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of Chinese history (History of China). Although an active general with high rank, he was known to desire wealth and treasure, and to dress himself in a gaudy fashion. It was said that he would kill wealthy officials or soldiers in order to confiscate their wealth for his own.


de title

30em Bibliography * was a military general of Eastern Wu during the late Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of Chinese history (History of China). Although an active general with high rank, he was known to desire wealth and treasure, and to dress himself in a gaudy fashion. It was said that he would kill wealthy officials or soldiers in order to confiscate their wealth for his own.


folktales

;. Hu, Jun (1994). Minhe Monguor Folktales (collected and translated folktales from Monguor and Chinese). China's Monguor Minority: ethnography and folktales. Sino-Platonic Papers. No. 59, pp 132–184. Kevin Stuart and Limusishiden. In Chinese record, the name of Wang Mang, who were historically recorded as "汪芒" was often confused with the name of "王莽." See Anonymous (2002). "Lu shi tai tai xiang wang mang Madam Lushi subdues Wang Mang 鲁氏

ban she Yunnan University Press 云南大学出版社. Chen, Zhaojun 陈照俊 , Li Xingzhong 李兴忠 , Lü Jianliang 吕金良 , Keith Slater, Kevin Stuart, Wang Xianzhen 王献珍 , Wang Yongwei 王永伟 , Huaizhi 辛怀志 Xin, Zhu Meilan 朱梅兰 , Zhu Shanzhong 朱山忠 , Zhu Wenhui 朱文辉 and Zhu Yongzhong 朱永忠 (2005). Zhongguo Minhe Tu zu min jian gu shi Folktales of China's Minhe Monguor 中国民和土族民间故事. München, Lincom Europa. In historical terms, the "Wang Mang" people were recorded more


bizarre event

, they could only see a white silk cloth dragging a long belt, flying rapidly towards the sky. Nobody dared to spread the bizarre event at the time. was a military general of Eastern Wu during the late Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms era of Chinese history (History of China). Although an active general with high rank, he was known to desire wealth and treasure, and to dress himself in a gaudy fashion. It was said that he would kill wealthy officials or soldiers in order to confiscate their wealth for his own.


personal+ability

years of the state, many of them from the north and all chosen for their personal ability and loyalty, to men from south of the Yangzi, whose families had prospered under the Sun regime. Outside of the court, families displayed their own independent authority. Wu, at times, was to a certain extent run for the protection of particular families.

Eastern Wu

'''Wu''' (229–280), commonly known as '''Eastern Wu''' or '''Sun Wu''', was one of the three major states that competed for supremacy over China in the Three Kingdoms period (220–280). Its name was derived from the place it was based in — the Jiangnan (Yangtze River Delta) region, which was also historically known as "Wu (Wu (region))". It was referred to as "Eastern Wu" or "Sun Wu" by historians to distinguish it from other Chinese historical states with similar names which were also located in that region, such as the Wu state (Wu (state)) in the Spring and Autumn Period and the Wuyue kingdom in the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. It was called "Eastern Wu" because it occupied most of eastern China in the Three Kingdoms period, and "Sun Wu" because the family name of its rulers was "Sun (Sun (surname))". During its existence, Wu's capital was at Jianye (Jiankang) (present-day Nanjing, Jiangsu), but at times it was also at Wuchang ( .

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