Duchy of Mantua

What is Duchy of Mantua known for?


century making

the Investiture Controversy, Pinamonte Bonacolsi took advantage of the chaotic situation to seize power — as Captain General of the People — in 1273. His family ruled Mantua for the next century, making it more prosperous and artistically beautiful. On 16 August 1328, the last Bonacolsi, Rinaldo, was overthrown in a revolt backed by the House of Gonzaga, a family of officials, namely the 60-year-old Luis and his sons Guy, Filippino and Feltrino Gonzaga Feltrino


power biography

1402 (1402 in Italy) near the town of Casalecchio di Reno, near Bologna. At this battle, a Bolognese army under Giovanni I Bentivoglio (Bentivoglio) opposed Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan, and his allies, the Malatesta (House of Malatesta) of Rimini and the Gonzaga (Duchy of Mantua) of Mantua. Bologna was aided by Florence in these cities' struggle to halt the expansion of Visconti's power. Biography He was born in Ferrara in 1586, and was educated at the Jesuit college in Parma beginning in 1602. He passed the next two years in Padua and spent 1606–07 studying in Piacenza before completing three years (1607–10) of study in philosophy at Parma. He spent another four years (1612–1616) studying theology in Parma and another year’s apprenticeship at Mantua. He then taught theology and mathematics in Parma, then in 1622 he became a preacher. For a time he received patronage of the Dukes of Mantua (Duchy of Mantua) and the Este (house of Este) in Ferrara. During this time he was involved in hydraulics projects. He would later return to teach mathematics again in Genoa, the city where he would die in 1650. As a cartographer, his life's work was the preparation of ''Italia'' or the ''Atlante geografico d'Italia'' (Geographic Atlas of Italy), printed posthumously by Magini's son in 1620. This was intended to include maps of every Italian region with exact nomenclature and historical notes. A major project, its production (begun in 1594) proved expensive and Magini assumed various additional posts in order to fund it, including becoming tutor in mathematics to the sons of Vincenzo I of Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua (Duchy of Mantua), a major patron of the arts and sciences. He also served as court astrologer. The Duke of Mantua, to whom the atlas is dedicated, assisted him with this project and allowed for maps of the various states of Italy to be brought to Magini. The governments of Messina and Genoa also assisted Magini financially in this project. Magini did not do any of the mapping himself. '''Vincenzo Gonzaga''' (21 September 1562 – 9 February 1612) was ruler of the Duchy of Mantua and the Duchy of Montferrat from 1587 to 1612. 1702 War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) (Great Britain, Germany, Holland, Portugal (Kingdom of Portugal), and Savoy v France, Spain, Mantua (Duchy of Mantua), and the electorates of Bavaria (Electorate of Bavaria) and Cologne (Electorate of Cologne)) As the couple had no surviving male issue, in 1612 duke Francis' next brother succeeded him in the Duchy of Mantua, whereas in the Duchy of Montferrat he was succeeded by his three-year-old daughter , because it had been historically inherited by females, being a margraviate. Indeed, it had been brought to the Mantuan princely dynasty (the Gonzaga) by the marriage of Margherita Paleologa, Margravine of Montferrat, in 1531. Accordingly, the baby Maria's claims were asserted and dowager duchess Margaret required to be made her regent in Montferrat. In 1662, Bartolomeo Stefani, chef to the Duchy of Mantua, published ''L'Arte di Ben Cucinare''. He was the first to offer a section on ''vitto ordinario'' ("ordinary food"). The book described a banquet given by Duke Charles (Charles III, Duke of Mantua) for Queen Christina of Sweden, with details of the food and table settings for each guest, including a knife, fork, spoon, glass, a plate (instead of the bowls more often used) and a napkin. Other books from this time, such as ''Galatheo'' by Giovanni della Casa, tell how ''scalci'' ("waiters") should manage themselves while serving their guests. Waiters should not scratch their heads or other parts of themselves, or spit, sniff, cough or sneeze while serving diners. The book also told diners not to use their fingers while eating and not to wipe sweat with their napkin. Del Conte, 15. result Peace of Zsitvatorok combatant1 22px (File:Gerae-tamga.svg) Crimean Khanate 25px (File:Flag of the Nogai people.png) Nogai Khanate (Nogai Horde) thumb 250px Details of Pisanello's frescoes in the "Hall of Pisanello". (File:Pisanello, torneo-battaglia di liuverzep 12.jpg) The '''''Palazzo Ducale di Mantova''''' ("Ducal Palace") is a group of buildings in Mantua, Lombardy, northern Italy, built between the 14th and the 17th century mainly by the noble family of Gonzaga (House of Gonzaga) as their royal residence in the capital of their Duchy (Duchy of Mantua). The buildings are connected by corridors and galleries and are enriched by inner courts and wide gardens. The complex includes some 500 rooms and occupies an area of c. 34,000 m². Although most famous for Mantegna (Andrea Mantegna)'s frescos in the Camera degli Sposi (Wedding Room), they have many other very significant architectural and painted elements.


Andrea

Rubens 123b.jpg thumb left 200px Vincenzo II Gonzaga, by Peter Paul Rubens thumb Ludovico III of Gonzaga Ludovico III (Image:Andrea Mantegna 058.jpg) receiving the news of his son Francesco being elected cardinal, fresco by Andrea Mantegna in the Stanza degli Sposi of the Palazzo Ducale (Palazzo Ducale di Mantova). After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, Mantua was invaded by Byzantines (Byzantine Empire), Lombards and Franks In the 11th century

. The buildings are connected by corridors and galleries and are enriched by inner courts and wide gardens. The complex includes some 500 rooms and occupies an area of c. 34,000 m². Although most famous for Mantegna (Andrea Mantegna)'s frescos in the Camera degli Sposi (Wedding Room), they have many other very significant architectural and painted elements.


impressive musical

and sciences. During the reign of Alfonso II, Ferrara once again developed an opulent court with an impressive musical establishment, rivaled in Italy only by the adjacent city of Venice, and the traditional musical centers such as Rome, Florence and Milan. Composers such as Luzzasco Luzzaschi, Lodovico Agostini, and later Carlo Gesualdo, represented the avant-garde tendency of the composers there, writing for gifted virtuoso performers, including the famous '' concerto


1624

of Montferrat through marriage. Federico commissioned Giulio Romano to build the famous Palazzo Te, in the periphery of the city, and profoundly improved the urbanistic assets of the city. In 1624, Francesco IV (Francesco IV of Gonzaga) moved the ducal seat to a new residence, the Villa della Favorita, designed by the architect Nicolò Sebregondi. In 1627, the direct line of the Gonzaga family came to an end with the vicious and weak Vincenzo II of Gonzaga Vincenzo II

The conversations he heard in his father's house inspired Tavernier with an early desire to travel, and in his sixteenth year he had already visited England, the Low Countries and Germany, and seen something of war with Hans Brenner, a colonel of cavalry in the Imperial service during the Thirty Years' War, whom he met at Nuremberg. Four and a half years in the household of Brenner's uncle, the viceroy of Hungary (1624–29), and a briefer connection in 1629 with the Counts and dukes


habit

of Rethel Duke of Rethel and his father the duke of Nevers (Count of Nevers), prince of Mantua (Duchy of Mantua), gave him the habit of courts, which was invaluable to him in later years; and at the defense of Mantua in 1629, and in Germany in the following year with Colonel Walter Butler (Walter Butler, 11th Earl of Ormonde) (afterwards notorious by having killed Wallenstein (Albrecht von Wallenstein)), he gained some military experience. *'''Ireland (Kingdom of Ireland)''' – William


mathematics

, and was educated at the Jesuit college in Parma beginning in 1602. He passed the next two years in Padua and spent 1606–07 studying in Piacenza before completing three years (1607–10) of study in philosophy at Parma. He spent another four years (1612–1616) studying theology in Parma and another year’s apprenticeship at Mantua. He then taught theology and mathematics in Parma, then in 1622 he became a preacher. For a time he received patronage

of the Dukes of Mantua (Duchy of Mantua) and the Este (house of Este) in Ferrara. During this time he was involved in hydraulics projects. He would later return to teach mathematics again in Genoa, the city where he would die in 1650. As a cartographer, his life's work was the preparation of ''Italia'' or the ''Atlante geografico d'Italia'' (Geographic Atlas of Italy), printed posthumously by Magini's son in 1620. This was intended to include maps of every Italian region with exact

nomenclature and historical notes. A major project, its production (begun in 1594) proved expensive and Magini assumed various additional posts in order to fund it, including becoming tutor in mathematics to the sons of Vincenzo I of Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua (Duchy of Mantua), a major patron of the arts and sciences. He also served as court astrologer. The Duke of Mantua, to whom the atlas is dedicated, assisted him with this project and allowed for maps of the various states of Italy


traditional musical

and sciences. During the reign of Alfonso II, Ferrara once again developed an opulent court with an impressive musical establishment, rivaled in Italy only by the adjacent city of Venice, and the traditional musical centers such as Rome, Florence and Milan. Composers such as Luzzasco Luzzaschi, Lodovico Agostini, and later Carlo Gesualdo, represented the avant-garde tendency of the composers there, writing for gifted virtuoso performers, including the famous ''concerto di donne'' — the three virtuoso female singers Laura Peverara, Anna Guarini, and Livia d'Arco. Vincenzo Galilei praised the work of Luzzaschi, and Girolamo Frescobaldi studied with him. In Italy some important sovereign ducal families were the Visconti (house of Visconti) and the Sforza, who ruled Milan (Duchy of Milan); the Capece Minutolo in Naples; the Savoia in Piemonte; the Medici of Florence; the Farnese (House of Farnese) of Parma and Piacenza (Duchy of Parma); the Cybo-Malaspina of Massa; the Gonzaga (House of Gonzaga) of Mantua (Duchy of Mantua); the Este of Modena (Duchy of Modena and Reggio) and Ferrara (Duchy of Ferrara). File:Italy 1796.png Map of Italy in AD 1796 File:Italy 1796.jpg Northern Italy in AD 1796. The duchies of Milan (Duchy of Milan), Mantua (Duchy of Mantua), and Modena and Reggio (Duchy of Modena and Reggio) were merged into the Cisalpine Republic, along with the Papal Legations (here labelled Papal States) and parts of Novara and the Venetian Republic. File:DuchyofModena19thCentury.png The Duchy of Modena and Reggio in the 19th century. Titles ''Joseph II, by the grace of God elected Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King in Germany (King of the Romans), King of Jerusalem, Hungary (King of Hungary), Bohemia (King of Bohemia), Dalmatia (History of Dalmatia), Croatia (History of Croatia), Slavonia, Galicia and Lodomeria (Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria), etc. etc. Archduke of Austria (List of rulers of Austria), Duke of Burgundy, Lorraine (List of rulers of Lorraine), Styria, Carinthia (Duchy of Carinthia), Carniola, Grand Duke of Tuscany (Grand Duchy of Tuscany), Grand Prince of Transylvania, Margrave of Moravia (March of Moravia), Duke of Brabant, Limburg (Duke of Limburg), Luxembourg, Gelderland (Guelders), Württemberg, the Upper and Lower Silesia (Duchy of Silesia), Milan (Duchy of Milan), Mantua (Duchy of Mantua), Parma, Piacenza (Duchy of Parma), Guastalla (County of Guastalla), Auschwitz (Duchy of Oświęcim), Zator (Duchy of Zator), Calabria (Duke of Calabria), Bar (Counts and Dukes of Bar), Montferrat, Teschen, Prince of Swabia, Charleville, Princely Count of Habsburg (Habsburg, Switzerland), Flanders (Count of Flanders), Tyrol (County of Tyrol), Hennegau (County of Hainaut), Kyburg, Gorizia, Gradisca, Margrave of the Holy Roman Empire (Antwerp), Burgau, the Upper and Lower Lusatia (March of Lusatia), Pont-à-Mousson, Nomeny, Count of Namur, Provence, Vaudémont, Blâmont, Zutphen (Count of Zutphen), Saarwerden (Sarrewerden), Salm, Falkenstein 22px (File:Gerae-tamga.svg) Crimean Khanate 25px (File:Flag of the Nogai people.png) Nogai Khanate (Nogai Horde) thumb 250px Details of Pisanello's frescoes in the "Hall of Pisanello". (File:Pisanello, torneo-battaglia di liuverzep 12.jpg) The '''''Palazzo Ducale di Mantova''''' ("Ducal Palace") is a group of buildings in Mantua, Lombardy, northern Italy, built between the 14th and the 17th century mainly by the noble family of Gonzaga (House of Gonzaga) as their royal residence in the capital of their Duchy (Duchy of Mantua). The buildings are connected by corridors and galleries and are enriched by inner courts and wide gardens. The complex includes some 500 rooms and occupies an area of c. 34,000 m². Although most famous for Mantegna (Andrea Mantegna)'s frescos in the Camera degli Sposi (Wedding Room), they have many other very significant architectural and painted elements.


food quot

Paleologa, Margravine of Montferrat, in 1531. Accordingly, the baby Maria's claims were asserted and dowager duchess Margaret required to be made her regent in Montferrat. In 1662, Bartolomeo Stefani, chef to the Duchy of Mantua, published ''L'Arte di Ben Cucinare''. He was the first to offer a section on ''vitto ordinario'' ("ordinary food"). The book described a banquet given by Duke Charles (Charles III, Duke of Mantua) for Queen Christina of Sweden, with details of the food


significant architectural

. The buildings are connected by corridors and galleries and are enriched by inner courts and wide gardens. The complex includes some 500 rooms and occupies an area of c. 34,000 m². Although most famous for Mantegna (Andrea Mantegna)'s frescos in the Camera degli Sposi (Wedding Room), they have many other very significant architectural and painted elements.

Duchy of Mantua

The '''Duchy of Mantua''' was a duchy in Lombardy, Northern Italy, subject to the Holy Roman Empire.

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