Dos Pilas

What is Dos Pilas known for?


recording

. Although Dos Pilas celebrated this as the victorious conclusion of the war, neither side had gained any real advantage over the other. For Dos Pilas, this battle represented the consolidation of its kingdom and the failure of Tikal to crush its splinter state before it gained a foothold. The hieroglyphic texts at Dos Pilas describe the victory in graphic terms, recording "pools of blood" and "piles of heads" as the result

is shown under the feet of Ucha'an K'in B'alam on Aguateca Stela 2. Sharer & Traxler 2006, p. 407. At Seibal a hieroglyphic stairway was built recording the city's new status as a vassal of Dos Pilas. At the same time as he erected these monuments to his victory, Ucha'an K'in B'alam ordered the destruction of the hieroglyphic records on the earlier monuments of Seibal, with inscriptions at Dos Pilas and Aguateca specifically recording the destruction

civilization in the northern lowlands, begun at La Passion states such as Dos Pilas, Aguateca, Ceibal (Seibal) and Cancuen ca 760 CE, followed by the Usumacinta system cities of Yaxchilan, Piedras Negras (Piedras Negras (Maya site)), and Palenque, following a south to north path. Toward the end of the late Classic period, the Maya stopped recording the years using the Long Count calendar, and many of their cities were burned and abandoned to the jungle. Meanwhile


nearby site

;Pilas. Coe 1999, p. 130. At about this time, the nearby site at Aguateca became a twin capital of the Dos Pilas kingdom, with victory monuments being erected simultaneously in both cities. In AD 743 K'awiil Chan K'inich, went to war against the sites of Ahkul and El Chorro (El Chorro (Mesoamerican site)). Two years later, in AD 745, he went to war against


early classic

The ''Mutal'' emblem glyph shared by Dos Pilas and Tikal. Martin & Grube 2000, p. 19. Early history (pre-A.D. 648) The early history of the Dos Pilas site is unclear, there are traces of an earlier indigenous dynasty predating the arrival of B'alaj Chan K'awiil from Tikal. From the Early Classic (Mesoamerican chronology) the Petexbatún region had been dominated by a Maya kingdom centred


publication work

Castellanos and Luis Fernando Luin year 2003 title La Escalinata 2 de Dos Pilas, Petén: Los nuevos escalones. url http: www.asociaciontikal.com pdf 58.02%20-%20Fahsen%20y%20Ortiz%20-%20en%20PDF.pdf format PDF online publication work XVI Simposio de Investigaciones Arqueológicas en Guatemala, 2002 (edited by J.P. Laporte, B. Arroyo, H. Escobedo and H. Mejía), pp. 679–692. publisher Museo Nacional de Arqueología y Etnología, Guatemala accessdate 2009-01

-10 language es : :


682

, p. 58. Balaj Chan K'awiil had a famous daughter with a second wife, this daughter was Lady Six Sky who was despatched to Naranjo to refound its obliterated dynasty. Sharer & Traxler 2006, pp.387, 389. Balaj Chan K'awiil is known to have made several further visits to Calakmul; in 682 he celebrated a period ending ceremony there under Yuknoom the Great and in 686 he attended the enthroning of his successor, Yuknoom Yich'aak K'ak'. ref name "

as (Ix) Wak Chanil Ajaw, aka "(Lady) Six Sky"—arrived in Naranjo in the year 682, to establish (or re-establish) a regal dynastic line at Naranjo. Wak Chanil is presumed to be the mother of the next-recorded Naranjo ruler, K'ak' Tiliw Chan Chaak who acceded in 693, although no known inscription explicitly establishes this relationship. Given that K'ak' Tiliw Chan Chaak was five years old when he acceded, it is most likely that his mother Lady Six Sky was ''de facto'' ruler


battle describing

by its allies, such as El Peru (El Perú (Maya site)), Dos Pilas and Caracol. Hammond 2000, p.220. In 677 Calakmul counterattacked against Dos Pilas, driving Tikal out and reinstalled B'alaj Chan K'awiil on his throne. In 679 Dos Pilas, probably aided by Calakmul, gained an important victory over Tikal, with a hieroglyphic description of the battle describing pools of blood and piles of heads. Late Classic Maya area: Uxmal, Toniná, Cobá, Waka', Pusilhá, Xultún, Dos Pilas, Cancuen, Aguateca; Central Mexico: Xochicalco, Cacaxtla, Cholula (Cholula (Mesoamerican site)); Gulf Coast: El Tajín and Classic Veracruz culture 600 CE (600 AD)–900 CE (900 AD)


732

wars with changing alliances, until Tikal defeated, in order, Dos Pilas, Caracol with the help of Yaxha and El Naranjo (Maya site), then Waka (El Perú, Guatemala), Calakmul's last Allie and finally Calakmul itself, and event that took place in 732 CE, with the Sacrifice of Yuknom Cheen's son in Tikal, that led to the construction of monumental architecture in Tikal, from 740 to 810 CE, being the last date documented here 899 CE. The ruin of the Classic Maya

with changing alliances, until Tikal defeated, in order, Dos Pilas, Caracol with the help of Yaxha and El Naranjo (Maya site), then Waka (El Perú, Guatemala), Calakmul's last Allie and finally Calakmul itself, and event that took place in 732 CE, with the Sacrifice of Yuknom Cheen's son in Tikal, that led to the construction of monumental architecture in Tikal, from 740 to 810 CE, being the last date documented here 899 CE. The ruin of the Classic Maya

with changing alliances, until Tikal defeated, in order, Dos Pilas, Caracol with the help of Yaxha and El Naranjo (Maya site), then Waka (El Perú, Guatemala), Calakmul's last Allie and finally Calakmul itself, and event that took place in 732 CE, with the Sacrifice of Yuknom Cheen's son in Tikal, that led to the construction of monumental architecture in Tikal, from 740 to 810 CE, being the last date documented here 899 CE. The ruin of the Classic Maya


classic period

the department (Departments of Guatemala) of Petén (Petén Department), Guatemala. It dates to the Late Classic Period (Mesoamerican chronology), being founded by an offshoot of the dynasty of the great city of Tikal in AD 629 in order to control trade routes (Trade in Maya civilization) in the Petexbatún region, particularly the Pasión River. Salisbury, Koumenalis & Barbara Moffett 2002. In AD 648 Dos&

on the sites of Tamarindito and Arroyo de Piedra. B'alaj Chan K'awiil founded Dos Pilas within the territory of this pre-existing kingdom and the new city quickly came to dominate the region. Founding and consolidation The interactions between Classic Period Maya city-states is deeply linked to the long-running power struggle between the two Maya "superpowers", Tikal and Calakmul, and the history of Dos Pilas

civilization in the northern lowlands, begun at La Passion states such as Dos Pilas, Aguateca, Ceibal (Seibal) and Cancuen ca 760 CE, followed by the Usumacinta system cities of Yaxchilan, Piedras Negras (Piedras Negras (Maya site)), and Palenque, following a south to north path. Toward the end of the late Classic period, the Maya stopped recording the years using the Long Count calendar, and many of their cities were burned and abandoned to the jungle. Meanwhile


running+power

on the sites of Tamarindito and Arroyo de Piedra. B'alaj Chan K'awiil founded Dos Pilas within the territory of this pre-existing kingdom and the new city quickly came to dominate the region. Founding and consolidation The interactions between Classic Period Maya city-states is deeply linked to the long-running power struggle between the two Maya "superpowers", Tikal and Calakmul, and the history of Dos Pilas


art research

Maya publisher University of Texas Press location Austin isbn 0-292-73855-2 oclc 25507968 :

Dos Pilas

--- thumb right 350px The Central Plaza of Dos Pilas. (File:Dos Pilas 1.jpg) native_name Dos Pilas common_name Dos Pilas continent North America region Central America country Guatemala era Late Classic status City government_type Monarchy year_start 629 year_end 761 event_end Site abandoned year_exile_start 672 year_exile_end 677 event1 Conquered by Calakmul date_event1 648 event2 Subjugated Seibal date_event2 735 capital Dos Pilas latd 16 latm 26.75 latNS N longd 90 longm 17.75 longEW W leader1 B'alaj Chan K'awiil leader2 Itzamnaaj K'awiil leader3 Ucha'an K'in B'alam leader4 K'awiil Chan K'inich year_leader1 648–692 year_leader2 698–726 year_leader3 727–741 year_leader4 741–761 '''Dos Pilas''' is a Pre-Columbian site of the Maya civilization located in what is now the department (Departments of Guatemala) of Petén (Petén Department), Guatemala. It dates to the Late Classic Period (Mesoamerican chronology), being founded by an offshoot of the dynasty of the great city of Tikal in AD 629 in order to control trade routes (Trade in Maya civilization) in the Petexbatún region, particularly the Pasión River. Salisbury, Koumenalis & Barbara Moffett 2002. In AD 648 Dos Pilas broke away from Tikal and became a vassal state of Calakmul, although the first two kings of Dos Pilas continued to use the same emblem glyph (Maya script#Emblem glyphs) that Tikal did. Webster 2002, p. 263. It was a predator state from the beginning, conquering Itzan, Arroyo de Piedra and Tamarindito. Dos Pilas and a nearby city, Aguateca, eventually became the twin capitals of a single ruling dynasty. The kingdom as a whole has been named as the Petexbatun Kingdom, after Lake Petexbatún, a body of water draining into the Pasión River.

Dos Pilas gives an important glimpse into the great rivalries and political strife that characterised the Late Classic. Much of the history of Dos Pilas can now be reconstructed, with a level of detail which is almost unparalleled in the Maya area. Martin & Grube 2000, p. 55.

On June 12, 1970, the site was declared a National Monument according to Article 1210 of the Guatemalan Ministry of Education.

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