Deir al-Balah

What is Deir al-Balah known for?


century show

, with a market, and a mosque, and hostelries." However, he goes on to say that in its current state, Rafah was in ruins, but was an Ayyubid postal station on the road to Egypt after nearby Deir al-Balah. Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) records in the 16th century show a small village of 16 taxpayers. Misleh Hussein Abu Jarad from Deir al-Balah in the Gaza Strip was killed and seven others were injured in Umm al-Fahm when police snipers


quot independent

reservoir of ground water in the vicinity. During the Six-Day War in June 1967, Deir al-Balah's mayor Sulaiman al-Azayiza briefly led local resistance against the incoming Israeli Army until formally surrendering the city shortly thereafter. The Israeli authorities took control over the springs, an important irrigation source. This move combined with increasing competition from Israeli citrus farmers, damaged the local citrus industry. ref

name "Independent" In 1982 the mayor and municipal council of Deir al-Balah were disbanded and replaced by an Israeli military-appointed administration. Mattar, 2005, p. 171. During the course of the Israeli occupation, Deir al-Balah's urban areas extended into lands designated for agriculture largely as a result of building restrictions which hindered organized expansion. When the First

Intifada broke out in 1987, Deir al-Balah's residents participated in the uprising against Israeli rule. Around 30 residents were killed during the uprising, ref>


gaza

population 54,439 popyear 2007 area 14,735 areakm 14.7 mayor Sa'ed Nassar '''Deir al-Balah''' or '''Dayr al-Balah''' ( south of Gaza City. The city had a population of 54,439

work BBC News date 2001-08-28 accessdate 2007-05-08 . .

2005-05-27 accessdate 2007-05-09 Ahmad Kurd, a Hamas member, was elected mayor in late January 2005.


intifada

by Israel in the Six-Day War. After 27 years of Israeli occupation, Deir al-Balah became the first city to come under Palestinian self-rule in 1994. Since the outbreak of the Second Intifada in 2000, it has witnessed frequent incursions by the Israeli Army (Israel Defense Forces) with the stated aim of stopping Qassam rocket fire into Israel.

Intifada broke out in 1987, Deir al-Balah's residents participated in the uprising against Israeli rule. Around 30 residents were killed during the uprising, ref>

; which formally ended in 1993 with the Oslo Accords between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and Israel. In 1994 Deir al-Balah was the first city to officially come under the control of the Palestinian National Authority as a result of the Gaza–Jericho Agreement. Page, 1993, p. 164. The city has been frequently targeted in Israeli military incursions since the Second Intifada in 2000, in part due to Qassam rocket-strikes by Palestinian


industry made

discouraged by Egyptian Army officers, but they were repelled and suffered casualties. Gelber, p. 57. Egypt captured the town along with the rest of the Gaza Strip during the war and later established a sharia court system that held jurisdiction over personal affairs. Burgel, 1985, p. 31. Egyptian rule introduced relative prosperity to Deir al-Balah. The town witnessed a booming citrus industry made possible by the discovery of a substantial reservoir of ground water in the vicinity. During the Six-Day War in June 1967, Deir al-Balah's mayor Sulaiman al-Azayiza briefly led local resistance against the incoming Israeli Army until formally surrendering the city shortly thereafter. The Israeli authorities took control over the springs, an important irrigation source. This move combined with increasing competition from Israeli citrus farmers, damaged the local citrus industry. In 1982 the mayor and municipal council of Deir al-Balah were disbanded and replaced by an Israeli military-appointed administration. Mattar, 2005, p. 171. During the course of the Israeli occupation, Deir al-Balah's urban areas extended into lands designated for agriculture largely as a result of building restrictions which hindered organized expansion. When the First Intifada broke out in 1987, Deir al-Balah's residents participated in the uprising against Israeli rule. Around 30 residents were killed during the uprising, from the railhead at Deir el Belah (Deir al-Balah), Allenby's troops did not have a line of defensive entrenchments behind which they could stop a concerted push by these two Ottoman armies. Such a counterattack could well see them driven back to Gaza and Beersheba. Bruce 2002, p. 155 This problem began to be addressed on 24 November as the advance into the Judean Hills ground to a halt in front of Nebi Samwil. On that day the first stage of operations officially known by the British as the Battle of Jaffa (1917) (even though Jaffa had been captured several days earlier, on 16 November 1917) began with the Anzac Mounted Division (commanded by Major General E. W. C. Chaytor) and the 54th (East Anglian) Division (commanded by Major General S. W. Hare) being sent north of Jaffa to attack and push back Kress von Kressenstein's Ottoman 8th Army. These Ottoman forces were pushed back northwards behind the Nahr el Auja (Yarkon River) enabling the construction of a new line of defences by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force to begin on the Mediterranean (Mediterranean Sea) coast. Bruce 2002, p. 155 See also Battle of Mughar Ridge for a description of the operations which resulted in the capture of Jaffa.


artistic+designs

; military road to Canaan. Bunson, 2002, p. 97. The square-shaped building had four towers at each corner and included a reservoir. Archaeological findings in Deir al-Balah revealed a large ancient Egyptian cemetery with graves containing jewelry and other personal belongings. The inhabitants of the fortress employed traditional Egyptian techniques and artistic designs in their architectural works. The cosmopolitan aspect of the frontier site is proven by the rich Cypriot (Cyprus#Prehistoric and Ancient Cyprus), Mycenaean (Mycenaean Greece) and Minoan (Minoan civilization) findings. Deir al-Balah remained in Egyptian hands until around 1150 BC when the Philistines conquered the southern coastal area of Canaan. The archaeological excavations at the Egyptian-period site were executed under Israeli occupation between 1972 and 1982 and headed by Trude Dothan. After the conclusion of the excavations the area was used for farming purposes and is now covered by vegetable gardens and fruit orchards while the main findings can be seen in Israeli museums like the Israel Museum in Jerusalem and the Hecht Museum in Haifa. from the railhead at Deir el Belah (Deir al-Balah), Allenby's troops did not have a line of defensive entrenchments behind which they could stop a concerted push by these two Ottoman armies. Such a counterattack could well see them driven back to Gaza and Beersheba. Bruce 2002, p. 155 This problem began to be addressed on 24 November as the advance into the Judean Hills ground to a halt in front of Nebi Samwil. On that day the first stage of operations officially known by the British as the Battle of Jaffa (1917) (even though Jaffa had been captured several days earlier, on 16 November 1917) began with the Anzac Mounted Division (commanded by Major General E. W. C. Chaytor) and the 54th (East Anglian) Division (commanded by Major General S. W. Hare) being sent north of Jaffa to attack and push back Kress von Kressenstein's Ottoman 8th Army. These Ottoman forces were pushed back northwards behind the Nahr el Auja (Yarkon River) enabling the construction of a new line of defences by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force to begin on the Mediterranean (Mediterranean Sea) coast. Bruce 2002, p. 155 See also Battle of Mughar Ridge for a description of the operations which resulted in the capture of Jaffa.


period site

"Bunson97" The cosmopolitan aspect of the frontier site is proven by the rich Cypriot (Cyprus#Prehistoric and Ancient Cyprus), Mycenaean (Mycenaean Greece) and Minoan (Minoan civilization) findings. Deir al-Balah remained in Egyptian hands until around 1150 BC when the Philistines conquered the southern coastal area of Canaan. The archaeological excavations at the Egyptian-period site were executed under Israeli occupation between


title public

1995 isbn 0878500812 * from the railhead at Deir el Belah (Deir al-Balah), Allenby's troops did not have a line of defensive entrenchments behind which they could stop a concerted push by these two Ottoman armies. Such a counterattack could well see them driven back to Gaza and Beersheba. Bruce 2002, p. 155 This problem began to be addressed on 24 November as the advance into the Judean Hills ground to a halt in front of Nebi Samwil. On that day the first stage of operations officially known by the British as the Battle of Jaffa (1917) (even though Jaffa had been captured several days earlier, on 16 November 1917) began with the Anzac Mounted Division (commanded by Major General E. W. C. Chaytor) and the 54th (East Anglian) Division (commanded by Major General S. W. Hare) being sent north of Jaffa to attack and push back Kress von Kressenstein's Ottoman 8th Army. These Ottoman forces were pushed back northwards behind the Nahr el Auja (Yarkon River) enabling the construction of a new line of defences by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force to begin on the Mediterranean (Mediterranean Sea) coast. Bruce 2002, p. 155 See also Battle of Mughar Ridge for a description of the operations which resulted in the capture of Jaffa.


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ancient site

Sea . east of the coast while the ancient

site of Darum was uncovered to the south of central Deir al-Balah. While the city's municipal borders stretch eastward close to the border with Israel, its urban area does not extend beyond the main Salah al-Din Highway (Salah al-Din Road) to the east.

Deir al-Balah

'''Deir al-Balah''' or '''Dayr al-Balah''' ( south of Gaza City. The city had a population of 54,439 in 2007. Table 14: Localities in Deir al Balah Governorate by Type of Locality and Selected Indicators, 2007. Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS). 2009. p. 62. The city is known for its date palms, after which it is named.

Deir al-Balah dates back to the Late Bronze Age when it served as a fortified outpost for the New Kingdom of Egypt. A monastery was built there by the Christian monk Hilarion in the mid-4th-century AD and is currently believed to be the site of a mosque dedicated to Saint George, known locally as al-Khidr. During the Crusader (Crusades)-Ayyubid (Ayyubid dynasty) wars, Deir al-Balah was the site of a strategic coastal fortress known as "Darum" which was continuously contested, dismantled and rebuilt by both sides until its final demolition in 1196; after this the site grew to become a large village on the postal route in the Mamluk (Mamluk Sultanate (Cairo)) era from the 13th to 15th-centuries and served as an episcopal see of the Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem in Ottoman (Ottoman Empire) times until the late 19th-century.

Under Egyptian control Deir al-Balah, whose population tripled through the influx of refugees (Palestinian refugee) from the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, was a prosperous agricultural town until its capture by Israel in the Six-Day War. After 27 years of Israeli occupation, Deir al-Balah became the first city to come under Palestinian self-rule in 1994. Since the outbreak of the Second Intifada in 2000, it has witnessed frequent incursions by the Israeli Army (Israel Defense Forces) with the stated aim of stopping Qassam rocket fire into Israel.

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