Dayton, Ohio

What is Dayton, Ohio known for?


white national

National Basketball League (National Basketball League (United States)) as the Dayton Rens based in Dayton, Ohio. That was also the final season for the NBL, which merged with the all-white Basketball Association of America to form the also all-white National Basketball Association. ** Joey D'Auria (1984–2001) at WGN-TV * '''Dayton (Dayton, Ohio) Springfield, Ohio''' ** David Eaton (early 1970s) at WSWO-TV (WBDT) *Columbus (Columbus, Ohio) - WCMH-TV 4


wide public

060914testimony_dcvoting.pdf title Statement on the subject of The District of Columbia Fair and Equal Voting Rights Act accessdate July 10, 2008 date September 14, 2006 format PDF publisher American Bar Association Richmond is considered to be within the Dayton, Ohio television market and has one full-power television station, WKOI, which is affiliated with TBN (Trinity Broadcasting Network). The city also has one county-wide Public, educational, and government access (PEG) cable television station, Whitewater Community Television. Whitewater Community Television home page. In April 1923, General Motors created the General Motors Chemical Company (GMCC) to supervise the production of TEL by the DuPont company. Kettering was elected as president, and Midgley was vice president. However, after two deaths and several cases of lead poisoning at the TEL prototype plant in Dayton, Ohio, the staff at Dayton was said in 1924 to be "depressed to the point of considering giving up the whole tetraethyl lead program." Over the course of the next year, eight more people would die at DuPont's Deepwater, New Jersey plant. Survivors * HGM-16F Atlas is on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. For years the missile was displayed outside the museum. In 1998 it was removed from display. It was restored by the museum's restoration staff and returned to display in the museum's new Missile Silo Gallery in 2007. The white nose cone atop the museum's Atlas is an AVCO IV re-entry vehicle built to contain a nuclear warhead. This nose cone actually stood alert in defense of the United States, as it was initially installed on an Atlas on 2 October 1962 at a Denton Valley launch site near Clyde, Texas. * Atlas 5A (56-6742) is on display on the lawn in front of the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa, Canada (Ottawa). Shortly after arriving in the new capital, Congress passed the Organic Act of 1801 (District of Columbia Organic Act of 1801), which officially organized the District of Columbia and placed the entire territory under the exclusive control (District of Columbia home rule) of the federal government. Further, the unincorporated area within the District was organized into two counties: the County of Washington (Washington County, D.C.) to the east of the Potomac and the County of Alexandria (Alexandria County, D.C.) to the west. She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


supporting+programs

Council 's ''Excellence in Economic Development Award'', celebrated as a national model of success. Ohio Third Frontier and Supporting Programs Win Top Tech Awards for Economic Development The state's cities have become hubs of modern industry, including Toledo (Toledo, Ohio) being recognized as a national solar center,


pace episode

one out of every four telephone directories in the United States. Plot C. J. Cregg goes home to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio)—and finds herself in the middle of an achingly sad family crisis—in this poignant change-of-pace episode. She's making the trip to speak at her 20th high-school reunion, but when she arrives at her father's house, she discovers that his new wife (her old English teacher) has left him. That is troublesome enough, but the fact that her father has Alzheimer's disease


arts number

, and Cincinnati. She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


national manufacturing

– penned his most famous works in the late 19th century and became an integral part of the city's history. thumb Dayton in 1870 (File:Dayton 1870.JPG) Innovation led to business growth in the region. In 1884, John Henry Patterson (John Henry Patterson (NCR owner)) acquired James Ritty's National Manufacturing Company along

of research into high altitude bailout, he made a series of three parachute jumps wearing a pressurized suit, from a helium balloon with an open gondola. thumb left Old National Cash Register on display at the Museo de la Secretaría de Hacienda y Crédito Público (Image:NatCashRegSHCP.JPG) in Mexico City. The company began as the '''National Manufacturing Company''' of Dayton, Ohio, which was established to manufacture and sell the first mechanical cash register, invented in 1879 by James Ritty. In 1884 the company and patents were bought by '''John Henry Patterson''' (John Henry Patterson (NCR owner)) and his brother Frank Jefferson Patterson and the firm was renamed the '''National Cash Register Company'''. Patterson formed NCR into one of the first modern American companies, introducing new, aggressive sales methods and business techniques. He established the first sales training school in 1893, and introduced a comprehensive social welfare program for his factory workers. She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


music comedy

Kolb would host a somewhat free form show that would feature music, comedy skits, dance and pantomime.


guitar abilities

and first-hand view of Price's guitar abilities. It also features a very in-depth interview with the musician himself, as well as other members of Foghat. Early life and education Pepper was born in Dayton, Ohio and now lives in the town of Middleburg, Virginia. She graduated high school in 1982 from The Madeira School and then attended the University of Washington in Seattle, earning a degree in anthropology. While in college, Pepper studied abroad in Nepal


band featuring

Carroll High School). Development of Alter High School was led by Reverend Paul F. Leibold, and, at the request of the people, the school was named after Archbishop Karl Alter. Archbishop Karl Alter was born on August 18, 1885 and died on August 23, 1977. '''Heatwave''' was an international funk disco musical band featuring Americans (United States) Johnnie Wilder, Jr. and Keith Wilder (vocals) of Dayton, Ohio, Englishman (England) Rod Temperton ( Keyboard


time program

facility. Over the years, as an ABC affiliate, WKRC-TV preempted moderate amounts of weekday programming and the Sunday morning cartoon reruns from ABC. When ABC offered late night programming from 11:30 pm to about 2:00 am, WKRC, like many other affiliates chose not to air it. It did air ''Nightline'' once that began in 1979. Occasionally, WKRC preempted a lower rated prime time program or movie from ABC to air either a stronger movie or a locally based special. Most programs not shown

Dayton, Ohio

'''Dayton''' ( Dayton is situated within the Miami Valley (Miami Valley (Ohio)) region of Ohio just north of the Cincinnati–Northern Kentucky metropolitan area.

Ohio's borders are within Dayton also plays host to significant research and development in fields like industrial, aeronautical (aeronautics), and astronautical (astronautics) engineering that have led to many technological innovations. Much of this innovation is due in part to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and its place within the community. With the decline of heavy manufacturing, Dayton's businesses have diversified into a service economy that includes insurance and legal sectors as well as healthcare and government sectors.

Other than defense (United States Department of Defense) and aerospace, healthcare accounts for much of the Dayton area's economy. Hospitals in the Greater Dayton area have an estimated combined employment of nearly 32,000, a yearly economic impact of $6.8 billion. Many hospitals in the Dayton area are consistently ranked by ''Forbes'', ''U.S. News & World Report'', and HealthGrades for clinical excellence.

Dayton is also noted for its association with aviation; the city is home to the National Museum of the United States Air Force. Orville Wright (Wright brothers), poet Paul Laurence Dunbar, and entrepreneur John H. Patterson (John Henry Patterson (NCR owner)) were born in Dayton. Dayton is also known for its many patents, inventions, and inventors that have come from the area,

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