Dayton, Ohio

What is Dayton, Ohio known for?


small home

, 1948 cleared their land, built their own houses, and ran small home businesses, from organic gardening to raising chinchillas, to help support themselves and their families. Reprint of Melbourne Times article, May 2, 1947 There was a community store Melbourne Village Community Store Interior run on the honor system. ref


band originating

, Ohio in November 1995, and formally signed in Paris on December 14, 1995. These accords put an end to the three and a half year long war in Bosnia (Bosnian War), one of the armed conflicts in the former Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (Yugoslav wars). '''Guided by Voices''' (often abbreviated as '''GBV''') is an American indie rock band (musical band) originating from Dayton, Ohio. Beginning with the band's formation in 1983, it made frequent personnel


top+art

art museums in the United States for kids. In 2007


run including

other northern Ohio districts, including the 9th district (OH-09) and the 11th district (OH-11). Through most of the 1970s and 80s a localized version of this series also ran in Dayton, Ohio on WKEF television, which was at the time owned by Springfield Television Corporation in Massachusetts, but this version featured several different hosts during its run, including at one time future conservative talk show host Mike Gallagher. '''David


school association

; where he was a standout wide receiver for the Tampa Catholic Crusaders high school football team. " FHSAA announces 33-member All-Century football team," Florida High School Association (December 12, 2007). Retrieved May 26, 2011. As a senior (senior (education)), Jackson set then-national high school records for career receiving yardage (4,594) and average yards per catch (24.05), and caught


major rock

group Guided by Voices. It was their second and final LP released under TVT Records and their second to feature a major rock producer in Rob Schnapf. The album was also their first to chart on the Billboard Top 200, peaking at #168. She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


history+large

, Geneva or Washington (Washington, D.C.), which would scarcely notice another conference, Daytonians were proud to be part of history. Large signs at the commercial airport hailed Dayton as the "temporary center of international peace". The local newspapers and television stations covered the story from every angle, drawing the people deeper into the proceedings. When we ventured into a restaurant or a shopping center downtown, people crowded around, saying that they were praying for us. Warren Christopher was given at least one standing ovation in a restaurant. Families on the air base placed "candles of peace" in their front windows, and people gathered in peace vigils outside the base. One day they formed a "peace chain", although it was not large enough to surround the sprawling eight-thousand-acre base. Ohio's famous ethnic diversity was on display. Richard Holbrooke, ''To End a War'', p. 234 Nickname Dayton is known as the "Gem City." The origin of the nickname is uncertain, but several theories exist. In the early 19th century, a well-known racehorse named "Gem" hailed from Dayton. In 1845, an article published in the ''Cincinnati Daily Chronicle'' by an author known as "T" stated: :"In a small bend of the Great Miami River, with canals on the east and south, it can be fairly said, without infringing on the rights of others, that Dayton is the gem of all our interior towns. It possesses wealth, refinement, enterprise, and a beautiful country, beautifully developed." She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.


main+criticism

accessdate 2009-09-06 Nonetheless, Palin's selection was a surprise to many because a main criticism he had of Obama was his lack of experience, and speculation had centered on other candidates, such as Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty, Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut, and former Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge. On August 29


opera performances

Ballet . In addition to Philharmonic and Opera performances, the Schuster Center hosts concerts, lectures, and traveling Broadway shows, and is a popular spot


vocal strength

magazines such as ''PopMatters,'' which called McEntire's vocals, "to sound sweet without being syrupy, while being extremely powerful. McEntire’s vocal strength yields a different kind of authority than the bluesy, drawling growl of Janis Joplin, the weathered rasp of Marianne Faithful, or even the soul-shrieking powerhouse of Tina Turner. Instead, Reba's voice combines the aspects of all three singers but tempers it with a Southern sweetness and an unmistakable femininity." She is one of two players from Notre Dame, along with Niele Ivey, to win the award. Women's Hoops Blog thumb right Henry Arnold at the controls of a Wright Model B (File:Henry Arnold May 1911.jpg) airplane 1911 While stationed in the Philippines in 1908, 2nd Lt. Henry H. Arnold assisted Capt. Arthur S. Cowan (then in the Infantry) in a military mapping detail. Cowan returned to the United States, transferred to the Signal Corps (Signal Corps (United States Army)), and was assigned to recruit two lieutenants to become pilots. Cowan contacted Arnold, who cabled his interest in also transferring to the Signal Corps but heard nothing in reply for two years. In 1911, relocated to Fort Jay, New York, Arnold sent a request to transfer to the Signal Corps, and on April 21, 1911 received orders detailing him and 2nd Lt. Thomas D. Milling to Dayton, Ohio, for flight instruction at the Wright brothers' aviation school. Beginning instruction on May 3, Milling had soloed on May 8 after two hours of flight time while Arnold made his first solo flight May 13 after three hours and forty-eight minutes of flying lessons. When he read sketchy newspaper reports about the Wright Brothers in early 1904, he decided to visit them and learn more. He drove his car nearly 200 miles on primitive roads to Dayton (Dayton, Ohio). On September 20, he witnessed Wilbur Wright fly the first complete circle by a heavier-than-air flying machine. He apparently also saw several other flights. Greatly enthusiastic about aviation, he delayed publishing an account of the flights in his magazine until the following January at the request of the Wrights. That article and followups he wrote were the only published eyewitness reports of Wright brothers flights at Huffman Prairie, a pasture outside Dayton where the Wrights developed the first practical airplane. Root offered his reports to ''Scientific American'' magazine, but was declined. His writing suggested the invention would cause profound changes: History In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds (Edward Andrew Deeds) formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company in Dayton, Ohio. In addition to building a factory in Moraine, Ohio, Deeds built an airfield on property he owned in Moraine for use by the company. Deeds was also interested in building a public aviation field along the Great Miami River approximately one mile (1.6 km) north of downtown Dayton, purchasing the property in March 1917. He called it North Field to differentiate it from the South Field in Moraine. Bishop Colaw has been the recipient of numerous ecumenical awards. He retired in 1988. He then became Professor of Homiletics and Christian Ministry at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, 1988-99. He also was the Acting President of the Seminary, 1995-96. Upon his second retirement he became Bishop in Residence at the North Naples United Methodist Church, Naples, Florida during winters. He also relaxes with golf, reading, and for many years was active in Rotary International.

Dayton, Ohio

'''Dayton''' ( Dayton is situated within the Miami Valley (Miami Valley (Ohio)) region of Ohio just north of the Cincinnati–Northern Kentucky metropolitan area.

Ohio's borders are within Dayton also plays host to significant research and development in fields like industrial, aeronautical (aeronautics), and astronautical (astronautics) engineering that have led to many technological innovations. Much of this innovation is due in part to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and its place within the community. With the decline of heavy manufacturing, Dayton's businesses have diversified into a service economy that includes insurance and legal sectors as well as healthcare and government sectors.

Other than defense (United States Department of Defense) and aerospace, healthcare accounts for much of the Dayton area's economy. Hospitals in the Greater Dayton area have an estimated combined employment of nearly 32,000, a yearly economic impact of $6.8 billion. Many hospitals in the Dayton area are consistently ranked by ''Forbes'', ''U.S. News & World Report'', and HealthGrades for clinical excellence.

Dayton is also noted for its association with aviation; the city is home to the National Museum of the United States Air Force. Orville Wright (Wright brothers), poet Paul Laurence Dunbar, and entrepreneur John H. Patterson (John Henry Patterson (NCR owner)) were born in Dayton. Dayton is also known for its many patents, inventions, and inventors that have come from the area,

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